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Nystart or Instegsjobb

Please share your experience!

michsimon
post 5.Apr.2013, 11:03 AM
Post #1
Joined: 19.Jan.2013

I registered some weeks ago as a job seeker to my local Arbetförmedlingen agency and they informed me that i was eligible to benefit from the nystarts or instegsjobb program, so i am quite curious to hear from others experiences.

Did anyone benefit from the Nystarts or Instegsjobb program? How was your job hunting experience and did that "advantage" somehow really helped you?
Any newcomer with a graduate/ post graduate degree or working experience from an EU country but who has a non-EU citizenship?
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gplusa
post 5.Apr.2013, 11:31 AM
Post #2
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

Can't talk about the last part, but I can talk about my expeience with an Instegsjobb. I arrived to Sweden as a non EU citizen, married to a Swedish citizen. Had no job. I signed up with Arbetsförmedligen and then went job hunting myself. Through straight dumb luck, I happened across an engineering design company who was desperate for bodies. They took me on for a one month Praktik trial, which we extended out to 2 months part time so that I could continue with SFI. My employer sent the relevant paperwork to Arbetsförmedligen, who then paid me a small allowance to cover my travel expenses during the Praktik period. At the end of the Praktik period, my employer decided that, in order to punish all the other people in the office, they would offer me a full time position. We settled on on a 6 month Provanställning trial employment. Basically a fixed term contract. The employer again negotiated directly with Arbetsförmedlingen and that six month period became an Instegsjobb. The expectation from both my employer and Arbetsförmedligen was that, unless I managed to burn the place down, this was a formality leading to a permanent role. It was no dfference for me, but it meant that Arbetsförmedligen paid 75% (from memory) of my salary during that time. At the end of the Instegsjobb period, I was offered a permanent position. So, from my perspective, I have only good things to say about the system. My employer got to find out how good or bad I was with minimal risk. Without that safety net they may not have taken a chance on me as a newly arrived foreigner with no Swedish work history and little Swedish language skill. 5 years later and I'm still with the same employer.
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PDX
post 5.Apr.2013, 11:58 AM
Post #3
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Aug.2011

QUOTE (gplusa @ 5.Apr.2013, 12:31 PM) *
At the end of the Praktik period, my employer decided that, in order to punish all the other people in the office, they would offer me a full time position.

I don't get this part (the punishment) - would you care to elaborate? smile.gif

~~~PDX~~~
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gplusa
post 5.Apr.2013, 12:27 PM
Post #4
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

Nah, it wasn't so bad. I think they are just mostly scared of me now.

It's actually been quite a fun experiment. So far I have taught my group that saying "Go F*** yourself" is a term of endearment, and that the 2 figured salute is a perfectly acceptable form of greeting when entering the office in the mornings.
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michsimon
post 5.Apr.2013, 12:31 PM
Post #5
Joined: 19.Jan.2013

Thanks @Gplusa for sharing your experience.

Were you working full time and attending swedish evening courses?
How long did it take you to reach an intermediate level in Swedish, with the study pace you had chosen?
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gplusa
post 5.Apr.2013, 12:56 PM
Post #6
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

When I started my Instegsjobb, I changed from day classes to evening SFI classes. That meant I had to change schools as the school I had been attending didn't offer evening classes. That slowed my formal progress down a little as the new school had a dfferent requirement for submitted assignments, meaning that I had to pretty much start over again. At first it annoyed me but then I realised that I was looking at things the wrong way. The goal was for me to learn Swedish, not just to gain a piece of paper. So I backed off the pace a little and focused on making use of the one time I would have in Sweden when I could focus solely on Swedish. The evening classes were 2 nights a week, which meant that I took nearly twice as long to complete the programme as more former daytime classmates. Again, time wasn't really an issue for me. I started with day classes in the August, and sat the final SFI exams in November of the following year. In terms of how good I was with Swedish, it wasn't until probably around 3 years before I felt that I could really hold my own and start to be taken seriously. During that time I was also continuing with the SAS programme during the evenings, which I would strongly recommend if you have the opportunity. With SFI you learn enough not to get shot, but with the SAS programme you start to learn how real Swedes use the language.
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