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yet another brit
Posted on: 28.Jun.2019, 07:38 PM





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There are several things you might want to think about...

1. Where you pay personal tax depends on where you are resident. It sounds as if you will be tax resident in the UK. Therefore, it becomes a question of how much liability for employers tax you can limit/avoid.

2. If you are/own a corporate entity (whether in the UK or SE) - either a sole trader or a limited company - then you invoice the client for the work. The corporate entity pays/reports in the country where it is incorporated. You who receive the money are liable to pay employers tax on your own behalf as required when/if you take a salary.

3. If you want the employer to pay you as a private individual, and you are resident elsewhere, then they can pay a reduced employers tax (the so-called SINK rate) which takes into account that you aren't accumulating a SE pension. But you need to apply for this.

Roughly put, a Swedish company can *either* pay an invoice as a B2B transaction ( in which case the receiving business - you - is responsible for the downstream consequences) *or* they can pay an individual, in which case they have to withhold employers tax at the full rate unless an exception (SINK) been applied for and approved since the recipient is not SE resident.

In other words, set your hourly rate wisely.
  Forum: Finance · Post Preview: #943383 · Replies: 2 · Views: 4,238

yet another brit
Posted on: 18.May.2019, 11:44 AM





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If you are really desperate for melatonin, you have your very own source available 24/7:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg1331...he-stress-away/
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #942904 · Replies: 25 · Views: 35,539

yet another brit
Posted on: 5.May.2019, 06:04 PM





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QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 2.May.2019, 10:22 PM) *
Melodic metal is the worst.


Isn't that an oxymoron?
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #942647 · Replies: 7 · Views: 6,528

yet another brit
Posted on: 1.May.2019, 07:21 PM





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Welcome to Islam, where the local time is 12:34
  Forum: Swedish news · Post Preview: #942591 · Replies: 7 · Views: 8,116

yet another brit
Posted on: 30.Apr.2019, 06:17 PM





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Only citizens can vote in parliamentary elections. EU citizens vote at the EU level in their country of residence, or if dual EU citizens, get to choose which country.

Taxation is a function of residence, not citizenship.

Military service - in theory and in wartime a citizen can be called up, but I wouldn't lose any sleep over the possibility. If you are in the call-up window (18-19 years old, so unlikely) you would be liable for assessment at a low probability of being called up involuntarily, and of course any children would get that obligation too.
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #942567 · Replies: 15 · Views: 12,530

yet another brit
Posted on: 27.Apr.2019, 11:33 AM





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QUOTE (Essingen55 @ 26.Apr.2019, 05:44 PM) *
Up to about two months ago,I used to think that this was a correct statement.


I am not so sure now, at least for British citizens.

If you look here,

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations...sonal-allowance

you will see that British citizens abroad are entitled to the UK tax allowance on UK sourced income.


...if you are tax liable in the UK...
  Forum: Finance · Post Preview: #942491 · Replies: 6 · Views: 5,229

yet another brit
Posted on: 26.Apr.2019, 05:07 PM





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There is some stuff on the tax agency site about having foreign property whilst tax liable in Sweden.

https://www.skatteverket.se/download/18.3aa...24919/39815.pdf

If you are tax liable in Sweden, then a property abroad is treated exactly as if it was in Sweden.

Which means (as a first approximation, and as a private person) - you can deduct 40k SEK from the rent you received, and then pay CGT on the remaining profit. Exactly as if you rented out a property that you own in Sweden.

You might want to consider holding the property via a corporate vehicle, which might well reduce the liability as you can be more creative about deductions. At a cost of extreme complexity.

Another point to watch out for is that selling a property in the UK whilst tax resident/liable in Sweden will trigger CGT, even if it is your primary residence, ie unlike the UK.
  Forum: Finance · Post Preview: #942482 · Replies: 6 · Views: 5,229

yet another brit
Posted on: 22.Apr.2019, 08:25 AM





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You can try. If it were me, I'd try to get an au pair/nanny/childminder for the season; nowhere near as common as in US/UK but does happen.

A couple of agencies that might be able (at no doubt excessive cost) to help you...

nanny.nu
nannyakuten.se
hemfrid.se/barnpassning
nannycare.se
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #942350 · Replies: 4 · Views: 3,817

yet another brit
Posted on: 21.Apr.2019, 06:25 PM





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QUOTE (Dejamara @ 21.Apr.2019, 04:06 PM) *
Does anyone have any suggestions? What do working parents usually do with their kids in Sweden during that time


The kids stay in daycare / school until the parents go on vacation. Schools have built-in before/after school kids club ("fritids"), which turns full-time at the end of term. All might well be closed in July, which means the parents also go on vacation in July. Grandparents known to cover the gaps :-) Everyone (to first approximation) takes four weeks vacation in July.

So - beyond the complete care provided by the state (!) - there isn't much extra-curricular provision for the younger ones, I am afraid. As you will have found, there are things for older ones to do, up to and including full residential "camps" in the US style; though some kind of thematic activity over a week or two (football, sailing etc) is more usual.
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #942334 · Replies: 4 · Views: 3,817

yet another brit
Posted on: 21.Apr.2019, 05:59 PM





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I wouldn't worry about anti-Christian conspiracy theories in Paris, when the real thing is just happening in Sri Lanka.

Re Paris - no need to attribute to malice that which can be more easily explained by stupidity.

Religion is like a sexual fetish. As long as no-one is being harmed without consent, then practice on your own, or with like-minded adults, and leave the rest of us - and especially any children - alone.
  Forum: International affairs · Post Preview: #942333 · Replies: 10 · Views: 26,380

yet another brit
Posted on: 21.Apr.2019, 11:15 AM





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  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #942327 · Replies: 7 · Views: 6,528

yet another brit
Posted on: 18.Apr.2019, 08:12 AM





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OP, you seem a bit underprepared...


690 x 168 (standard #hours / month) = 115k, so I suspect that was a loaded rate already, ie, from which employers tax, vacation, company pension, insurances, other benefits etc would be taken before you can see the equivalent of a gross "normal" salary? If so, then roughly halve that to get an "normal" salary, and that would be about right, say 60k. [multipliers for contractors vary from about 1.8-2.3 depending on which business, level, agency, etc].

But if that was the salary you were getting from an agency *after* employers tax etc, then they must love you.
  Forum: Gothenburg · Post Preview: #942260 · Replies: 16 · Views: 44,475

yet another brit
Posted on: 8.Apr.2019, 09:25 PM





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It's a little bit of a cat and mouse game - the more open the vendor is with the questions, the less his/her potential liability about what the buyer knew if anything turns up. But the more open he/she is, the more likely it is that the buyer will pull out or request a price reduction. Welcome to the mind-games of Swedish real estate!
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941975 · Replies: 8 · Views: 5,924

yet another brit
Posted on: 8.Apr.2019, 09:14 PM





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It isn't *illegal* [olagligt] in the strict sense (though I will admit that the terminology gets confused, especially in translation). It would be a breach of contract [avtalsbrott], which is a civil matter, not a criminal one. And as such, open to reasonable negotiation.
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941974 · Replies: 12 · Views: 4,220

yet another brit
Posted on: 8.Apr.2019, 08:20 PM





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Living somewhere else for a while is (or could be) a valid reason. If it were me, I would certainly give it a go.
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941971 · Replies: 12 · Views: 4,220

yet another brit
Posted on: 8.Apr.2019, 07:47 PM





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QUOTE (m_j_1986 @ 8.Apr.2019, 05:18 PM) *
@yet another bit

Yes its HSB. And I agree that they are trying to make an example out of my scenario.
What do you mean by 'their lawyers are very trigger happy'? Have you encountered any of them in the past?


Yes I have, or rather one of my relatives. Very stroppy lawyers letters arriving quickly notifying eviction, but in reality all was OK once x,y,z was put right and sufficiently grovelling mea culpas issued. So they might back off if you are polite and apologetic. Most of all, explain that you *did* have a legal right to sublet, you just missed the requirement. It isn't a genuine defense of course, but what can you lose?
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941968 · Replies: 12 · Views: 4,220

yet another brit
Posted on: 8.Apr.2019, 07:43 PM





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It can all be very local, though. I mean, if you live in Kista but go the other way on your bike, you'll be on J?rvaf?lt, and you can still find places around the edge that might (just) be as quiet as you want.

You shouldn't discount the areas south of the city (as in, further south than Tumba/Hallunda). There are still some very "countryside" spots.
  Forum: Stockholm · Post Preview: #941967 · Replies: 5 · Views: 10,399

yet another brit
Posted on: 7.Apr.2019, 07:51 PM





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QUOTE (Bsmith @ 6.Apr.2019, 10:07 PM) *
My advice is to buy an existing cabin rather than build. You will get a lot more bang for the buck and experience a lot less hassle and stress.

My 2 cents.


I'd agree. Plenty of places that fit the description, but with the advantage of already being there, and hence having permission to even exist...for example, even in the middle of nowhere you can't just drill for water without permission.

Sweden has a zillion old cottages out there ready to go. If you are happy for your outgoing sanitary arrangements to consist of "a bucket in a little cute hut, but still a bucket" then the world is your oyster.

And good luck :-)
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941945 · Replies: 5 · Views: 2,995

yet another brit
Posted on: 7.Apr.2019, 07:41 PM





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  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941944 · Replies: 12 · Views: 4,220

yet another brit
Posted on: 7.Apr.2019, 07:36 PM





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You're welcome.

If/when you sign a contract, there should be a "question list" at the end; this is where the vendor has to fess up to questions like "is there planning permission for everything you've done"; "are you aware of any faults", "please detail any improvements you have made"... and so on...pay attention to that list :-)
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941943 · Replies: 8 · Views: 5,924

yet another brit
Posted on: 7.Apr.2019, 07:05 PM





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  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941939 · Replies: 8 · Views: 5,924

yet another brit
Posted on: 7.Apr.2019, 03:48 PM





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Prices outside Stockholm/Gothenburg/Malmo are low by rest-of-EU standards, yes.

If you look on Booli (rather than Hemnet) you can see the actual sale prices. You can also see (if I recall correctly) what the change between advertised price and final price is.

Standard would be 10% due (into the agents escrow account) within a week of signing. Balance transferred simultaneously with the completion. Normally, you tell the estate agent who your bank is, and they will talk to the banks concerned and make sure it happens in real time (you sit drinking coffee with the vendor whilst the estate agent runs around). This might be tricky for you, but you could (for example) transfer the complete sum to the estate agents escrow account before the transaction day.

If you are not getting a mortgage, there is no mortgage registration cost, but there will be stamp duty (1.5% of taxable value). If there are existing mortgages, you take them over (at no cost), and can borrow against them as the formal security.

No lawyers fees here - the agent does the work.

Catches? Sure. If there isn't a survey, you'll have to have one done, and if necessary haggle the price as a result (you can write this as a clause in the contract). You want to end up in the situation where you have fulfilled your duty as a purchaser - to have made yourself aware of any failings in the property. For example - were any renovations involving wet-rooms done, and is so are they signed off and certified? You have a certain protection against hidden faults (things you could not reasonably have known about or expected) but it can be a bit of a grey area. For example, if you buy a new property, you can reasonably expect work to have been done to a modern, approved, standard, and can get compensation if it turns out that it isn't. If you buy an old house, you can't necessarily expect that, so the duty of inspection falls on you.
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941934 · Replies: 8 · Views: 5,924

yet another brit
Posted on: 3.Apr.2019, 09:07 PM





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Migrationsverket is a government agency, and part of the executive
Migrationsdomstolen is under the justice department, and part of the judiciary

So no, they strictly speaking are not the same organisation, and have constitutionally separate roles. In theory, migrationsdomstolen provides oversight of, & legal decisions for, migrationsverket who then implement them.

In practice, it might be difficult to tell which is which... and to paraphrase someone else - "the difference is that migrationsverket hold you down whilst migrationsdomstolen screws you".
  Forum: Visas · Post Preview: #941759 · Replies: 3 · Views: 2,236

yet another brit
Posted on: 3.Apr.2019, 02:24 PM





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QUOTE (john.boy @ 2.Apr.2019, 09:46 PM) *
Right, except for tax debts.
There is no limited liability for tax debts, for recovery they can claim against any of the board members.


Even then, the tax office has to claim negligence or deliberate action. If, for example, a company has applied in good faith for bankruptcy or reconstruction as the problem emerged then a tax debt cannot be pursued against the directors.
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941745 · Replies: 11 · Views: 5,862

yet another brit
Posted on: 3.Apr.2019, 02:16 PM





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QUOTE (fishing @ 2.Apr.2019, 05:01 PM) *
So if the company is sued, then I personally also can be sued. And if the company owe someone money and the company can't pay it back, then I have to pay back.
Is it right?


Not unless you were found legally liable to have failed in your fiduciary duty - that is the whole point of an AB ("limited liability" and all that).

Going broke isn't necessarily a failure of fiduciary duty either (ask The Donald...)

A styrelsesuppleant isn't required to sign off the company accounts, by the way. But if they did (for whatever reason) then they have the same accountability as any other director; accountability to the shareholders when convened at a general meeting, for example.

For many a small company, the shareholders, styrelsen and suppleant are all the same family, of course...
  Forum: Life in Sweden · Post Preview: #941743 · Replies: 11 · Views: 5,862

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