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Pay levels for basic jobs

What's reasonable?

SeldomSeenKid
post 31.Mar.2010, 12:33 PM
Post #1
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 20.Jan.2010

Hello

I was lucky enough to be able to move here and carry on doing the same job I had back home, but the pay isn't exactly what one could call amazing. It's left me wondering if I could in fact earn more doing a basic job like working in a pub or something. Does anyone know what a pretty basic hourly rate is for that kind of work here? Is there an equivalent of the UK minimum wage?

Thanks!
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Hunter66
post 31.Mar.2010, 12:46 PM
Post #2
Joined: 16.May.2009

what did you do in the UK which you are carrying on doing here?
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Puffin
post 31.Mar.2010, 01:04 PM
Post #3
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

There is no minumum wage in Sweden - many workplaces do have collective union agreements that set minimum wages
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Michele
post 31.Mar.2010, 02:23 PM
Post #4
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 3.Jun.2005

When I cooked part time in a daycare, I made 110/hr. It would have been 100/hr, but we agreed that 'vacation time' would come in the form of an extra 10 an hour since I only needed the time off that the school was closed anyway. smile.gif
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kaze
post 31.Mar.2010, 03:04 PM
Post #5
Joined: 22.Mar.2008

A guy I know working in a pub gets 100 an hour. Then theres tips and that. Much better than the UK!
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wotist
post 31.Mar.2010, 04:44 PM
Post #6
Joined: 8.Oct.2009

QUOTE (Michele @ 31.Mar.2010, 02:23 PM) *
When I cooked part time in a daycare, I made 110/hr. It would have been 100/hr, but we agreed that 'vacation time' would come in the form of an extra 10 an hour since ... (show full quote)

Michele, you're legally entitled to 12% "Semesterersättning" if you are hourly employed and get your vacation in cash instead of time off. In most collective agreements it's 13%
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Rick Methven
post 31.Mar.2010, 05:50 PM
Post #7
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

If you are over 25 then the absolute minimum you will get in any job would be 100Kr per hour
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Michele
post 31.Mar.2010, 07:25 PM
Post #8
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 3.Jun.2005

QUOTE (wotist @ 31.Mar.2010, 04:44 PM) *
Michele, you're legally entitled to 12% "Semesterersättning" if you are hourly employed and get your vacation in cash instead of time off. In most collective agreements it's 13%

smile.gif Thank you for the info and the mail about it. It was actually 5 years ago and I'm no longer working there, so I was just giving a general number for the OP to use as reference. smile.gif
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soultraveler3
post 1.Apr.2010, 12:26 AM
Post #9
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 12.May.2009

One of my teachers in SFI used to complain all the time that after going to uni for years, her and other teachers don't get paid anything, while her 3 brothers all make about double what she does. Two of her brothers are construction workers and the third is a plumber, none of them went past högskolan.

I know working in pharmacy here doesn't pay anywhere near what is does in the states. Add to that the fact that you're required to go to years of school again (including swedish) to do the same thing you were doing before and there's not much incentive to mess with it.

So, yes, from what I've seen at least, there's a good chance you'd be better off with a basic job here. Think that's why there's so many doctor / taxi drivers and engineer / pizza shop owners etc. in sweden.
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SeldomSeenKid
post 1.Apr.2010, 08:19 AM
Post #10
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 20.Jan.2010

Thanks for the info everyone - my suspicions have been confirmed!
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Puffin
post 1.Apr.2010, 09:18 AM
Post #11
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

There is quite a lot of research to show that higher education does not benefit you in female dominated professions such as teaching, nursing, physiotherapy pharmacy

There have been many reports - not least during the nurses strike a couple of years ago - that show
- nursing assistants that train as full nurses have lower take home pay
- the guy that services the machines on the maternity ward has a higher take home pay than the midwife who is legally responsible for the health of the mother and baby during delivery

One of the problems is that Sweden has relatively flat pay scales where the progression amounts are quite low.

Sweden doesn't have the issue of working poor minimum wage staff that many countries have - however because the starting levels of low-qualified staff is higher - then there is little distance for the qualified staff:
- for example if many of the gymnasiet/high school qualified staff working as: nursing assistants, teaching assistants, care home staff, home helps, disability care staff etc are earning 17,500-22,000sek/month - then the starting salary for a graduate nurse or teacher where starting salaries are 20,000-24,000 sek/month seem very low - and after they have paid their student loan each month they may be worse off... sad.gif
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Puffin
post 1.Apr.2010, 09:20 AM
Post #12
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

You might want to check out this site which gives average salaries for a whole long list of occupations

However it is important to remember that these are *average* salaries and not starting salaries which are often several 1000s lower - and that it averages out all workers - whereas some parts of the occupation might have higher/lower salaries
http://www.lonestatistik.se/yrken-a-till-o.asp
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Puffin
post 1.Apr.2010, 09:25 AM
Post #13
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (soultraveler3 @ 1.Apr.2010, 01:26 AM) *
3 brothers all make about double what she does. Two of her brothers are construction workers and the third is a plumber, none of them went past högskolan.

Do you mean Högskolan or Högstadiet
Högskolan = type of University - a college that offers degrees but does not have full university status
Högstadiet = high school for kids aged 13-16

QUOTE
So, yes, from what I've seen at least, there's a good chance you'd be better off with a basic job here. Think that's why there's so many doctor / taxi drivers and engineer / pizza shop owners etc. in sweden.

Most non EU doctors are caught up by the 3 years or so it takes to pass all the necessary exams to be licenced in Sweden.

By Swedish standards doctors are well paid with and average salary of 45,000-50,000 - few taxi drivers make that
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Themasterpiece
post 1.Apr.2010, 08:50 PM
Post #14
Joined: 18.Mar.2008

QUOTE (soultraveler3 @ 1.Apr.2010, 01:26 AM) *
Think that's why there's so many doctor / taxi drivers and engineer / pizza shop owners etc. in sweden.

Really? Must not have been any good at their profession then.
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IND
post 5.Apr.2010, 08:24 PM
Post #15
Joined: 5.Sep.2009

''There is quite a lot of research to show that higher education does not benefit you in female dominated professions such as teaching, nursing, physiotherapy pharmacy''

In my experience, higher education doesn't pay in any industry in Sweden.
I recently invested a fortune in doing MBA and ended up getting no salary raise from my employer. Even the job profile was very difficult to change after the MBA.
My class mates from US got immediate impact from their MBA!
Frustrating sad.gif
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