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The Local _ Family _ What is sambo actually?

Posted by: queenS 3.Mar.2012, 10:06 AM

Does it count as sambo if you and your partner are registered on the same address? Is there any special registration at Skatteverket necessary, or just simple address change?

Posted by: Bender B Rodriquez 3.Mar.2012, 10:09 AM

Yes, no need for any type of extra registration.

Posted by: Puffin 3.Mar.2012, 10:09 AM

You have to be registered at the same address to be a sambo - it means cohabitation (sammanboende) in Swedish - that you are living in a marriage-like relationship

Posted by: johnjohn 3.Mar.2012, 10:14 AM

Sambo means sammanboende or living together or co-habitation. Its legal definition refers to living together as man and wife or you can think of it as a common law marriage.

Posted by: queenS 3.Mar.2012, 10:21 AM

So from the perspective of Skatteverket there is no difference between sambo and inneboende? I am not saying that this is the same, just that in case that for example I claim that my sambo is not my sambo, but inneboende, he would have to prove that somehow. Right?

Posted by: johnjohn 3.Mar.2012, 10:48 AM

When you speak about skatteverket you are referring to issues relating to taxes, nothing to do with visa etc, Am I correct. Do you have a specific tax or benefit question you need help with?

Posted by: Ugly Indian 3.Mar.2012, 10:59 AM

It means officially f**king partner with out marraige rolleyes.gif

On a serious note its same like registered partner in english.. the person you are living with according to Skatteverket.

Posted by: Bender B Rodriquez 3.Mar.2012, 11:08 AM

QUOTE (queenS @ 3.Mar.2012, 11:21 AM) *
So from the perspective of Skatteverket there is no difference between sambo and inneboende? I am not saying that this is the same, just that in case that for example I claim that my sambo is not my sambo, but inneboende, he would have to prove that somehow. Right?

There is a difference. A sambo has certain rights if the relationship ends, i.e. dividing up property that was bought for the household. An inneboende has no such rights.

Posted by: queenS 3.Mar.2012, 11:26 AM

That I know and I am not saying that these two things are the same. My only guess is that "on the paper" they look the same until proven otherwise.

But since your mentioned ending relationship, what other rights a sambo has in that case?

Posted by: cogito 3.Mar.2012, 02:30 PM

To the OP.
As half of a long and happy marriage, I cannot speak from experience. But from what I understand from family lawyer friends, there is some re-thinking of the whole sambo setup. Though advantageous for men, It often turns out to be a bad deal for women. You might want to do a search for articles on the author Stieg Larsson's sambo Eva Gabrielsson.

Posted by: sarah02 3.Mar.2012, 03:39 PM

This co-habitation law is a hippy thing invented by a hippy couple in france in the 60s. As cogito mentioned, it has disatvantages for the women.

Posted by: axiom 3.Mar.2012, 04:28 PM

this is an interesting question, I have heard it asked before among my friends who were curious to find out how do you actually register as a sambo.

as far as I understood it, there is no paper to be signed or forms to complete, it is taken from the fact that you share the same address.

how do you differentiate that from anyone else living with you, doesn't seem possible apart from taking each other's word for it and perhaps the usual things that come with it, ie, co-mingling assests, going on holidays, etc

say u had a lodger living with you for a few yrs, and you got along very well, went out together, went on holidays, etc he / she ***could*** in theory claim to be have been your sambo and thus demanding a little share of what you have ... tricky it seems but perhaps someone else will shed some more light on this.

Posted by: Bender B Rodriquez 3.Mar.2012, 10:15 PM

QUOTE (axiom @ 3.Mar.2012, 05:28 PM) *
how do you differentiate that from anyone else living with you, doesn't seem possible apart from taking each other's word for it and perhaps the usual things that come with it, ie, co-mingling assests, going on holidays, etc

Yes, the only thing that legally separates sambo from flat mates is the above. Thus, sambo is not on the same legal ground as marriage. When you split up you only divide the household items that were bought for common use (including house/flat), and the sambo also has no legal grounds for inheritance.

Posted by: Bender B Rodriquez 3.Mar.2012, 10:17 PM

QUOTE (sarah02 @ 3.Mar.2012, 04:39 PM) *
This co-habitation law is a hippy thing invented by a hippy couple in france in the 60s. As cogito mentioned, it has disatvantages for the women.

Because women are always economically inferor to men? It has the same disadvantages to men and women.

Posted by: sarah02 3.Mar.2012, 10:25 PM

No, the disadvantages do not equally fall on women the same as men. Money might be one factor of many.

Posted by: Bender B Rodriquez 3.Mar.2012, 10:31 PM

QUOTE (sarah02 @ 3.Mar.2012, 11:25 PM) *
No, the disadvantages do not equally fall on women the same as men.

That is only under the assumption that the women is economically less well off than the man. The law does not separate gender.

If one plays that game the disadvantage actually falls on the man since a rental flat will go to the partner that has most use for it, i.e. and if there are kids involved this usually means to the woman...

Posted by: axiom 4.Mar.2012, 12:54 AM

But I find it intriguing that given the deep acceptance that sambo has in the Swedish culture, there isn't a formal way to record this, not even a tick on a box at skatteverket :/

Posted by: Marmi 4.Mar.2012, 01:09 AM

It's very uncommon living together unless you are a couple. Having roommates, or live-ins is very uncommon in Sweden compared to the rest of the world. Could possibly be that has something to with there not being a need to register that one is a sambo. smile.gif

I only know of one set of friends living together (in Sweden), sharing a two bedroom apartment, and that was only because on of them was in-between apartments. They ended up sharing the apartment for about 2-3 years. Other than them, I don't know of anyone who has shared living with someone that is not a "significant other".

Posted by: Willy 4.Mar.2012, 01:45 AM

QUOTE (axiom @ 4.Mar.2012, 12:54 AM) *
But I find it intriguing that given the deep acceptance that sambo has in the Swedish culture, there isn't a formal way to record this, not even a tick on a box at skatteverket :/

There is, it's called marriage... biggrin.gif

The whole point of the sambo legislation is to give some marriage-like rights to couples who don't bother to register their relationship, i.e., get married.

Posted by: axiom 4.Mar.2012, 02:02 AM

Nope. not really . . .

I think you will find that there are jurisdictions that have specific registrations for common law relationships ie sambos which is very different from a marriage and in some cases purely voluntary

just do a quick google biggrin.gif

Posted by: queenS 4.Mar.2012, 09:12 AM

QUOTE (Bender B Rodriquez @ 3.Mar.2012, 10:31 PM) *
That is only under the assumption that the women is economically less well off than the man. The law does not separate gender.

If one plays that game the disadvantage actually falls on the man since a rental flat will go to the partner that has most use for it, i.e. and if there are kids involved this usually means to the woman...

I presume that this applies only in the case when both partners are on the rental agreement, or?

Posted by: Bender B Rodriquez 4.Mar.2012, 09:54 AM

No, it applies anyway. However, the flat must be acquired for common purpose, i.e. if one has a house or flat and one part moves in, this flat is not part of the common household. However, if both moves to a new flat this one becomes a part of the common goods, no matter who is on the rental agreement.

Posted by: BritVik 4.Mar.2012, 11:15 AM

Just been thinking back to 1960, when I came to Sweden and encountered their word sambo. It was a word I knew, but one that had been used in a very different context, and one that would be considered extremely non-PC by today's standards. Racist even. Do any others recall that older meaning I wonder? 'Living together' it certainly was not. It was - to say the least - a little confusing.

Posted by: DaveN 4.Mar.2012, 05:09 PM

Yeah, you can't call black people sambo nowadays, but you can still call white people snowflake, I believe.

Posted by: SimonDMontfort 4.Mar.2012, 06:00 PM

QUOTE (BritVik @ 4.Mar.2012, 10:15 AM) *
Just been thinking back to 1960, when I came to Sweden and encountered their word sambo. It was a word I knew, but one that had been used in a very different context, and one that would be considered extremely non-PC by today's standards. Racist even. Do any others recall that older meaning I wonder? 'Living together' it certainly was not. It was - to say the least - a little confusing.

You and me too!

I found myself wishing there was a different phrase to 'sambo' (when I first arrived in Sweden) - with the word's connotations with the kind of racist language of the past, in English speaking countries

Posted by: johnjohn 4.Mar.2012, 06:44 PM

50 years ago it was a favorite story of mine as well as millions of others since 1899.

 
 

Posted by: BritVik 4.Mar.2012, 08:44 PM

The very book I remembered.
But you had better watch out publishing the cover, nothing is as it was. Even Tintin comes under fire these days, and you can't buy marmelade with that on the label any more. Nor can I say that I have heard any of the old Stephen Foster songs either. All now belonging to a bygone era. And yet still living in Sweden albeit in a different context

Shall I rant and say Sweden should get up-to-date? Or just let the likes of carterhayes come in and do their bit?

Posted by: newyorkman 12.Mar.2012, 02:21 AM

I dont understand how or why this thread turned into a discussion of race. The word "Sambo" as used in the States isnt swedish and has a different tonation and pronounciation. There are a myriad of words that are found in different languages, that are unrelated and have different meanings.
So unless you are either mispronouncing the Swedish word "sambo" or are ignorant of the US pronounciation, why would a Black person be insulted?

Posted by: byke 12.Mar.2012, 07:54 AM

Is there even the remotest possability that hetrosexual migrant flat sharers could discover they have been registered as In sambo?

What about nuns who live in a convent?

Posted by: orangetree 12.Mar.2012, 08:18 AM

Sambo is a Soviet martial art, means self-defense without weapons.

 
 

Posted by: Puffin 12.Mar.2012, 09:12 AM

Sambo has existed for a long time in Sweden - not a modern phenomena at all - it developed from the so called "Stockholm äktenskap" (Stockholm marriages) of the 1800s where people lived together without formally being married

There is a sambo law in Sweden which regulates what is considered joint property in the event of separation
https://lagen.nu/2003:376

Although if you are living in a sambo relationship you can draw up a sambo agreement or sign away your rights

However important to consider
- the sambo law states that property acquired during the realtionship is joint property unless there is a formal agreement to the contrary

- BUT - sambos do not inherit each other - so if one of you dies your sambos share of the house/assets revert toe their family (unless there is an agreement) - something that Steig Larsson's sambo has lived to regret!!

Posted by: Puffin 12.Mar.2012, 09:15 AM

QUOTE (SimonDMontfort @ 4.Mar.2012, 06:00 PM) *
You and me too!
I found myself wishing there was a different phrase to 'sambo' (when I first arrived in Sweden) - with the word's connotations with the kind of racist language of the past, in English speaking countries

Just need to accept that different languages have different words for stuff

For example the word "kiss" means urine in Sweden - should we get the US to stop buying Hershey's wee-wee cool.gif

Posted by: Pikkumyy 12.Mar.2012, 10:33 AM

QUOTE (SimonDMontfort @ 4.Mar.2012, 05:00 PM) *
You and me too!

I found myself wishing there was a different phrase to 'sambo' (when I first arrived in Sweden) - with the word's connotations with the kind of racist language of the past, in English speaking countries

It's still pretty offensive, even amongst the twenty-somethings here in the UK smile.gif Had an awkward moment the other day, trying to explain to my boyfriend why it was deemed inappropriate to be shouting about 'sambo' in our local area. Message received, loud and clear!

Posted by: MisterDuck 5.Feb.2016, 03:46 PM

QUOTE (Bender B Rodriquez @ 4.Mar.2012, 08:54 AM) *
No, it applies anyway. However, the flat must be acquired for common purpose, i.e. if one has a house or flat and one part moves in, this flat is not part of the common household. However, if both moves to a new flat this one becomes a part of the common goods, no matter who is on the rental agreement.



Does this apply to a house purchased instead of rented? Eg if I buy a house for cash so I own it outright, then I move in with my sambo and live there together. If we later break up does she get half the house despite not paying for it?

Posted by: DuneSunny2 5.Feb.2016, 06:30 PM

If you are Swedish and Female - it means that you are the boss. If you are a male and an expat - you have nothing to say.

Posted by: Emerentia 5.Feb.2016, 07:51 PM

QUOTE (MisterDuck @ 5.Feb.2016, 03:46 PM) *
Does this apply to a house purchased instead of rented? Eg if I buy a house for cash so I own it outright, then I move in with my sambo and live there together. If we later break up does she get half the house despite not paying for it?


It does. It doesn't matter who payed for the house or apartment, the key issue is if it was bought with the intent of both of you living there together or not.

"Cohabitees and their joint homes - a brief presentation of the Cohabitees Act "

"Division of property

A division of property includes the cohabitees

Posted by: DuneSunny 6.Feb.2016, 03:42 PM

QUOTE (MisterDuck @ 5.Feb.2016, 03:46 PM) *
Does this apply to a house purchased instead of rented? Eg if I buy a house for cash so I own it outright, then I move in with my sambo and live there together. If we later break up does she get half the house despite not paying for it?



[quote name='Emerentia' post='883509' date='5.Feb.2016, 07:51 PM']It does. It doesn't matter who payed for the house or apartment, the key issue is if it was bought with the intent of both of you living there together or not.

"Cohabitees and their joint homes - a brief presentation of the Cohabitees Act "

"Division of property

A division of property includes the cohabitees

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