The Local is not responsible for content posted by users.
2 Pages V   1 2 >   Reply to this topic

Considering Moving to Sweden

Any advice?

TheaterRaven
post 13.Sep.2014, 07:57 AM
Post #1
Joined: 13.Sep.2014

Hello, everyone,

I'm a native of the United States (California) and I spent last summer in Lund as a study abroad student. I'm a college graduate now and I've been thinking of going back there to live. I loved it in Sweden and met lots of wonderful people. The overall ambiance of the country was lovely. I was wondering if anyone has any advice for me. It would be a great change to move halfway across the world and I honestly don't know where to start.

A few specifics about me:
I don't speak Swedish (I learned a little, but nothing that would be considered even remotely fluent)
I am visually impaired and would need to know what assisting services are available for people with disabilities in Sweden (most notably with helping to find employment).

Thanks for any advice you may have.

Sincerely,
Alicia
Go to the top of the page
+
Emerentia
post 13.Sep.2014, 09:09 AM
Post #2
Joined: 23.Dec.2011

Hi!

To learn Swedish, there is SFI, Swedish for Immigrants courses you could take. But try to learn as much Swedish as you can on you own, before you get here. Listen to audiobooks, watch Swedish films or TV-shows, even if you just understand a little bit of it, keep listening until it gets a little bit easier. Talk to yourself. In Swedish. When you are alone of course. Translate some of your thoughts when you are sitting on a bus. Try to name as many things you see around you, in Swedish. Yes, this sounds silly, but it might help a bit. (edit... Oh, I realized the visually impaired part right after I posted this, I'm sorry, it's of course hard to name stuff you see around you on the bus then... But what I meant was just stuff you come to think of and come across in a every day situation. I hope I didn't offend you, that wasn't my intention)

Synskadades riksf
Go to the top of the page
+
Svensksmith
post 13.Sep.2014, 01:01 PM
Post #3
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

Alicia:

Sweden has its allures and I understand your desire to move there. Emerenitia's advice on learning the language is sound. The other piece of advice I will share (and have done so before numerous times) is to start saving money. Many people find it takes two years on average before finding a job in Sweden. And, not to be cruel, your vision impairment may just make it all the harder. So learn the language, plan and save money. Hopefully it will work out for you. Good luck.
Go to the top of the page
+
TheaterRaven
post 14.Sep.2014, 03:56 AM
Post #4
Joined: 13.Sep.2014

Thank you both for your suggestions.

Emerentia, are there any films or TV shows you would recommend in particular?
And thank you for the link to Synskadades riksf
Go to the top of the page
+
sv100
post 14.Sep.2014, 07:45 AM
Post #5
Joined: 4.Jan.2014

Yes , sweden is very Nice place if You've goal
Even if you don't , its very Nice place Cause You've much time to Waste .
Prepare yourself also , to take driving lessons as you'll cast your US d/l .
Visits / short term stay is unlike residence / long term stay .

Good luck
Go to the top of the page
+
Emerentia
post 14.Sep.2014, 10:08 AM
Post #6
Joined: 23.Dec.2011

QUOTE (TheaterRaven @ 14.Sep.2014, 02:56 AM) *
Emerentia, are there any films or TV shows you would recommend in particular?

When I wrote the first part I wasn't thinking about that you said that you are visually impaired so I just wrote down some general advice, about learning Swedish... Maybe suggesting watching film- and TV-shows wasn't the best advice to give someone who is visually impaired, but there are films that are... I don't know the English word for this... "syntolkad", if I translate it directly it's like "sighttranslated", it's someone who tells whats going on on the screen och one of the sound tracks.

Here is a list of Swedish on DVD that has been "syntolkade"
http://www.skane.se/sv/Webbplatser/Skanes_...rytt/Filmrutan/

It's sad to see that they are so few. Of these I recommend "L?t den r?tte komma in" and "Monica Z". Maybe it's hard for you to come by these in the US, though.

When it comes to films in general, maybe you can watch them with some one who tells you whats going on on the screen, there are some films that is good to watch for an immigrant, not since that they are particularly good, but they are sort of iconic, and "so Swedish" in a way and almost every Swede has seen them.

And then I'm not talking about Bergman films, but films like "G?ta kanal", "S?llskapsresan", "J?garna", "Adam & Eva", "Att ang?ra en brygga", "?nglag?rd", "Fucking ?m?l" ("Show me love"), "Tillsammans", "Torsk p? Tallinn" Any film based on Astrid Lindgrens books. Some are a bit dated, bt I think they give some insight to Sweden, Swedish society and mentality, Swedish humor in a way.

And all Roy Anderssons and Ingemar Bergmans films are worth watching.

Here's some TV-series I come to think of:"Bron", "?kta m?nniskor", "Solsidan", "Torka aldrig t?rar utan handskar", "Allt faller", for instance.
Go to the top of the page
+
TheaterRaven
post 15.Sep.2014, 12:30 AM
Post #7
Joined: 13.Sep.2014

Thanks for the recommendations, and yes, I know exactly what you mean by movies where a person is describing what's going on. We have them here in the States, too. I don't use them because i have enough sight to see the screen, but I do have to be close to the screen to see the subtitles.

I have actually seen "Fucking ?m?l". We watched it last summer in my Swedish class. It was a good movie.
Go to the top of the page
+
Marmi
post 15.Sep.2014, 01:33 AM
Post #8
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 8.Nov.2005

TheaterRaven - I hope you do know that you can't just up, and move to Sweden, right?. HOW do you plan on going about the move? Work Visa, Student Visa, or visa based on being in a relationship with a Swede? Just wondering, cause you don't mention any of that, other than that you're considering moving to Sweden. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
TheaterRaven
post 15.Sep.2014, 02:16 AM
Post #9
Joined: 13.Sep.2014

Hi, Marmi,

Of course I know I can't just up and move to Sweden. smile.gif I know there are visas involved, but I know nothing about obtaining them. I honestly have no idea what the process of moving to another country would entail, which is why I'm posting here to find out more.

As for my visa, it would be a work one. But I assume you'd have to have a job secured in Sweden before you can get one, which will be especially difficult for me.
Go to the top of the page
+
Opalnera
post 15.Sep.2014, 01:41 PM
Post #10
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

I like Sweden in the Summer too laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
Svensksmith
post 15.Sep.2014, 02:33 PM
Post #11
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

Opalnera has a point. Sweden's winters are not for everyone.
Go to the top of the page
+
TheaterRaven
post 16.Sep.2014, 05:02 AM
Post #12
Joined: 13.Sep.2014

I'm sure they aren't, but I'm willing to see how I do. I know Sweden's famous (or infamous, I guess, depending on how you want to look at it) for its dark, cold winters, but if that's what they're like, okay. I'm adventurous, and you only live once, right? smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
makemydag
post 16.Sep.2014, 09:25 AM
Post #13
Location: Jönköping
Joined: 7.Apr.2014

Don't be deterred from the Swedish winters! I moved here from Southern California, and the last winter I spent here was very pleasant. If you are planning on living in southern Sweden, then you don't have to worry about the perpetual darkness. In J
Go to the top of the page
+
trumanshow
post 16.Sep.2014, 04:11 PM
Post #14
Joined: 8.Aug.2012

I think there is a lot to be said for the solid white winter that you get further north. I'd rather have lots of snow for a longer period of time which brightens things up. You need a bit more preparation for it though. I also dont think that the weather in itself is the problem its just that it goes on for a very, very, very long time. If you are used to winter being a chilly couple of months then Sweden can be a shock. When you get to mid January and are already a bit fed up, the prospect of at least a further 3 months is pretty daunting.
Go to the top of the page
+
enged
post 16.Sep.2014, 05:35 PM
Post #15
Joined: 13.Apr.2014

Unless you have specialized skills in a highly sought-after field (e.g. IT), your chances of obtaining a work visa are almost nil. Employers aren't going to go through the trouble of sponsoring a foreigner when they can just hire someone who is already here. And that's not even mentioning the language issue.

Do you have a degree in a specialized field? What sort of work would you be looking for?
Go to the top of the page
+

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members: