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Organisations offering the C++ course in English?

Best c++ in Stockholm

AriesIN
post 19.Apr.2010, 03:12 PM
Post #1
Joined: 4.Mar.2008

Hi,

Hey IT people, I am looking for C++ course in English in stockholm . Any good recomendations ?
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gplusa
post 19.Apr.2010, 05:47 PM
Post #2
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

C++ ? That's got be be like a B-. Not setting your sights very high.
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Craptastical
post 19.Apr.2010, 08:16 PM
Post #3
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 21.Feb.2007

Oh boy. Language wars. And which languages are you a fan of?
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nic_tester
post 19.Apr.2010, 08:45 PM
Post #4
Joined: 17.Jan.2008

Personally, i think java has the best syntax.
Why not learn c++ from a book? Buy stroserups basic book (a bit messy) and then some course-book.
However, if you are getting started with programming, i strongly recommend not to start with c++, its the most difficult language ive come across, for several reasons.
c++ is built to be used in several different programming paradigms.
c++, for a high-level language, is very close to the machine. This makes for alot of messy bugs.
c++ does not have a garbage-collector which makes memory handling a pain. And it really requires that you learn about pointers, primary adresses and the like. Its a pain.

So, it depends on what you gonna use it for. If you want to produce programs, there are several much much better languages. Personally i do not like the rich syntax of the microsoftlanguages but lots of people are exceedingly productive with them. Visual studio and vb or c# are very good, if you like that sortof thing.

If you still gonna go for c++, then learn c first. The basic book by riche is fantastic, the language-core is much smaller and more centered and you can use all you learn when you continute with c++. Mind you, i never worked professionally with c or c++ so maybe the world is different now. Personally, i really dont see any task that really requires c++ in todays world. More or less.
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Craptastical
post 19.Apr.2010, 08:57 PM
Post #5
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 21.Feb.2007

QUOTE (nic_tester @ 19.Apr.2010, 09:45 PM) *
Personally, i think java has the best syntax.Why not learn c++ from a book? Buy stroserups basic book (a bit messy) and then some course-book.However, if you are getting start ... (show full quote)

By Visual Studio you mean which language exactly? Back in the day VB was part of that messy glob. Luckily I haven't had the (ahem) "pleasure" of working with anything MS related (this is also when I was having to search for missing periods in COBOL. Arrrgh!)

WRT learning languages though, perhaps there's a specific reason why the OP wants to. Perhaps something as simple as a future project requirement, or maybe the OP wants to increase his/her usefulness at their company which already uses C++. Could be lots of reasons smile.gif

But, as a beginner language I would strongly discourage learning C++ first *unless* you are something of a natural when it came to learning functional and OO concepts as well as picking up syntax fairly quickly. If that's not the case, there may be better languages to use as a starting point. Maybe picking up a scripted OO language like Ruby or Python. Heck, even Java if you're able to start off slow and don't get ahead of yourself (it can be very easy to be overwhelmed with all of the stuff Java allows you to do out of the box).
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 19.Apr.2010, 09:59 PM
Post #6
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (nic_tester @ 19.Apr.2010, 08:45 PM) *
However, if you are getting started with programming, i strongly recommend not to start with c++, its the most difficult language ive come across, for several reasons.c++ is b ... (show full quote)

C++ is what you make it to be. You don't want to use pointers, fine, don't use them.
No one uses all the functionality in C++; I would even say that the language is so vast that no one knows C++ fully, even though they may think so.

QUOTE (nic_tester @ 19.Apr.2010, 08:45 PM) *
If you want to produce programs, there are several much much better languages.

Yes, the choice of language depends on you what you use it for, but I assure you that most languages are good for producing "programs"...

QUOTE (nic_tester @ 19.Apr.2010, 08:45 PM) *
Personally, i really dont see any task that really requires c++ in todays world. More or less.

Most people combine high level languages like Python and Java with low level languages like C and FORTRAN to get the best of both worlds. Low level languages are still very hot due do the increased need for true parallelism and high performance codes, which still needs you to be able to control your memory allocation and data shuffling. I would say that if you do high level programming you should know the low level stuff to avoid embarrassingly slow and resource hungry codes...

I would recommend the OP to learn Python first because it is a "fun" language and it is easy to produce interesting applications...
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Fishtank
post 20.Apr.2010, 09:49 AM
Post #7
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

In Sweden: Always DIY.

If you happen to be Indian, get Yashwant Kanetkars books on C, Understanding pointers in C, C++ and C++ FAQ and read cover to cover. It shall cost you less than 500SEK to get these shipped to you in Sweden.

Once done with reading, get into the pit and get your hands dirty with sample codes from these books. That shall take you long way.

One more thing: NEVER ever spend more than 1 second time with any person who says C++ is extension of C language or likewise. RUN FASTER away from such informed programmers.

And yes, knowing C++ as programming language as well as having decent handle on Object Oriented paradigm will take you long long way in business no matter which fancy technolgies come and go.

Personally long long time ago when I was young, I started off with BASIC(Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code), then FORTRAN and then C and C++ and then moved onto Windows Programming with SDK and then VC++ MFC(Thats your visual suite product) and then eventually migrated to Delphi + DB2 Oracle and MS SQL and then J2EE and then Java and so on. There is no end in sight for technology as it appears. sad.gif

Well, it all comes down to what you wanna do and what this is all about.

Just starting off with Java might even give you chance to get into business at some entry level but sooner or later you are gonna hit the wall on technical side with basics of OOP concepts which are not too hard to understand but not damn easy to grasp either.

Hope I added enough to your confusion.
Hope that helps.
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AriesIN
post 21.Apr.2010, 02:19 PM
Post #8
Joined: 4.Mar.2008

Tonns of suggestions thanks a lot guys but I still need the name of Organisation which can give indepth C++ course in English.

I know both C++,Java,J2EE , lets not get into why I need this information , I would be more thankful if you could provide information then suggestion (that ofcourse doesnot mean I am not thankful for your sugggestions wink.gif ).
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Fishtank
post 21.Apr.2010, 03:20 PM
Post #9
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

http://www.learningtree.se/courses/se337.htm

http://foretagsutbildning.nti.se/programme...g_cplusplus.asp

http://www.init.se/init/kursinfo.aspx?id=5...;epslanguage=en

Contact these ones and ask if they happen to provide you course in english.
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