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Learning to teach in Sweden

Can I study in English?

anonali
post 22.Aug.2010, 08:25 PM
Post #1
Joined: 22.Aug.2010

Hi everyone,

I was wondering whether it is possible to study teaching in Sweden through English? I would look in particular at the 16-19 age group and would specialise in Maths and Economics. I have an Irish bachelors degree in Finance and Economics and some years working experience in Finance.

Many thanks for any help you could give me.

Regards
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Puffin
post 23.Aug.2010, 06:03 AM
Post #2
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

No - this is not possible - you must have Swedish to train as a teacher here

All qualified teachers in Sweden require University Entrance level Swedish of either the TISUS test or Gymnasiet Svenska B - it is one of the minimum requirements

The new Education legislation will soon make it illegal for schools to employ teachers that aren't fully qualified as permanent teachers - all teachers will have to register with the School Agency and that will include proof of Swedish which all teachers need regardless of nationality
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Rick Methven
post 23.Aug.2010, 06:20 AM
Post #3
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE (anonali @ 22.Aug.2010, 09:25 PM) *
Hi everyone,I was wondering whether it is possible to study teaching in Sweden through English? I would look in particular at the 16-19 age group and would specialise in Maths ... (show full quote)

Do you think a Swede would be able to study teaching in Ireland without knowing any English and have the college in Ireland teach in Swedish?
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Puffin
post 23.Aug.2010, 06:51 AM
Post #4
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Actually I think that OP may be able to find some short term contract work with no Swedish teaching in billingual schools as an unqualified teacher - you would need to make sure that you taught the National Curriculum though

However the problems will come when the registration scheme is introduced - this is a problem that many of the free/billingual schools are going to have soon. Many are used to using a (cheap) supply of foreign/non Swedish speaking teachers who they pay less than they would have to pay a qualified teacher - but this is why the kids often do badly in the Nationella Prov (National tests) as the kids have teachers who cannot even read the questions for themselves in Swedish

But it's cheap labour for these big companies which is why they make such big profits
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anonali
post 23.Aug.2010, 07:16 AM
Post #5
Joined: 22.Aug.2010

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 23.Aug.2010, 06:20 AM) *
Do you think a Swede would be able to study teaching in Ireland without knowing any English and have the college in Ireland teach in Swedish?


Actually a minimum level of Irish is required for any Irish student wishing to teach in Ireland but this is waived for non-nationals teaching at a secondary level. Besides, there are plenty of erasmus students in both countries studying, oddly enough, through English.

Thanks for the notes Puffin. I'd like to learn to teach in Sweden (through English if possible) but would work in an English speaking country so I don't think I fall into some of your concerns. Your opening line is pretty clear all the same.

Thanks,
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Puffin
post 23.Aug.2010, 07:55 AM
Post #6
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (anonali @ 23.Aug.2010, 08:16 AM) *
Thanks for the notes Puffin. I'd like to learn to teach in Sweden (through English if possible) but would work in an English speaking country so I don't think I fall i ... (show full quote)


Oh - So you are just wanting to come here to grab some free education from Swedish taxpayers before disappearing somewhere else?

You realise that any teaching courses would require you to train in the Swedish National Curriculum and do teaching practice in Swedish schools?
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byke
post 23.Aug.2010, 09:30 AM
Post #7
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

QUOTE (Puffin @ 23.Aug.2010, 07:51 AM) *
Actually I think that OP may be able to find some short term contract work with no Swedish teaching in billingual schools as an unqualified teacher - you would need to make su ... (show full quote)



I find this type of statement quite offensive and quite honestly full of crock.
While we may have different views on education etc, and I dont disagree that foreign teachers may get a worse deal at times.

Labeling certain foreign teachers as "unqualified" because they dont have a Swedish language qualification to teach subjects which they may be qualified to do so in English is not really fair (especially if they are teaching that subject correctly but in English). Have you seen the qualifications needed for Swedes to teach in English? its a joke.

The reason why many bi-lingual schools may do bad is because they are generally treated as holding pens for foreign kids in Sweden until they can be "converted". They are damned to fail from the start.

I think if you really are interested in bi-lingual schools you should try working in one.
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anonali
post 23.Aug.2010, 10:47 PM
Post #8
Joined: 22.Aug.2010

QUOTE (Puffin @ 23.Aug.2010, 07:55 AM) *
Oh - So you are just wanting to come here to grab some free education from Swedish taxpayers before disappearing somewhere else?You realise that any teaching courses would req ... (show full quote)



talk about hostility.

I never mentioned that I wanted to get free education, merely education. I'm happy to pay. I don't know how things work which is why I asked the question. Many countries have international schools which teach in English to allow foreign residents' kids to reintegrate easily into English/American schools should their parents move back so perhaps I could do my practice there or else do my practice in an english speaking country. I'd like to train in the Swedish Curriculum. I spent long enough studying the Irish one to feel fairly comfortable in that already.

You realise as an EU citizen I can come to your country anytime I want and inflate your house prices, take your jobs and chat up your women too right?

Gimme a break.
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swozzie
post 23.Aug.2010, 11:22 PM
Post #9
Joined: 8.Oct.2009

QUOTE (anonali @ 23.Aug.2010, 09:47 PM) *
talk about hostility.. You realise as an EU citizen I can come to your country anytime I want and inflate your house prices, take your jobs and chat up your women too right?. Gimme a break.


laugh.gif I hope you do anonali as we defintely need more feisty people here to dilute the interminably bland and correct.
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Rick Methven
post 24.Aug.2010, 05:07 AM
Post #10
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE
I'd like to train in the Swedish Curriculum


Which is taught in SWEDISH
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Puffin
post 24.Aug.2010, 07:42 AM
Post #11
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (byke @ 23.Aug.2010, 10:30 AM) *
Labeling certain foreign teachers as "unqualified" because they dont have a Swedish language qualification to teach subjects which they may be qualified to do so in ... (show full quote)


Not sure I understand your comment here Byke - OP is not a teacher at all - but is looking to do teacher training - but only if it's taught in English - which is a problem as the Swedish National Curriculum is taught in Swedish as you have to do VFU in Swedish schools.

Do you know any country in the world that accepts teachers for registration who cannot speak the language? All an overseas trained teacher needs to do is get themselves a TISUS certificate

Many of the bilingual schools do their students a diservice when their kids have been educated in Sweden but cannot comprehend basic Swedish words - I was with theis great American guy when I started at Uppsala University - he had great gymnasiet grades from a very posh Stockholm billingual school but was completely unable to follow the introduction lectures and was forced to order books in English as his Swedish was so poor


QUOTE
Have you seen the qualifications needed for Swedes to teach in English? its a joke.

What do you mean exactly?
You need a Bachelor degree with English as the major subject to be a qualified English teacher

All teachers in Sweden are required to train to teach 2 subjects
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Puffin
post 24.Aug.2010, 07:59 AM
Post #12
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (anonali @ 23.Aug.2010, 11:47 PM) *
talk about hostility.. You realise as an EU citizen I can come to your country anytime I want and inflate your house prices, take your jobs and chat up your women too right?. Gimme a break.



I was just going by what you yourself wrote about wanting to work in an English speaking country after qualifying as a teacher - so it sounded as though you were only interested in doing training in Sweden which is well known for is free University.

QUOTE (anonali @ 23.Aug.2010, 08:16 AM) *
but would work in an English speaking country so I don't think I fall into some of your concerns. Your opening line is pretty clear all the same.



QUOTE
I never mentioned that I wanted to get free education, merely education. I'm happy to pay. I don't know how things work which is why I asked the question. Many countries have international schools which teach in English to allow foreign residents' kids to reintegrate easily into English/American schools should their parents move back so perhaps I could do my practice there or else do my practice in an english speaking country. I'd like to train in the Swedish Curriculum. I spent long enough studying the Irish one to feel fairly comfortable in that already.


You cannot pay to attend University - but you have to meet the criteria for entry

If you want to teach in a private International School then you need to take a teaching qualification in a country that these schools teach as most look to recruit experienced teachers with several years of post qualification teaching in the main school types such as IB, Brittish, US etc. Although they would sometimes recruit experienced teachers from Canada, Australia etc. Very few schools outside the country of origin are registered to train teachers in a national curriculum - for example if you want to train and qualify in the British Curriculum you have to do your training in Britain (there are also a couple of British forces schools and one school in Dubai I believe).

Sweden does have billigual schools which recruit teachers trained abroad - however you cannot be registered as a teaching student at a Swedish University without having Gymnasiet Svenska B/ TISUS etc - all lectures in teaching methods are in Swedish and you would be required to teach in state schools and converse with students who perhaps speak no English.

If you are already qualified in Ireland then you may find work in a billigial school
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byke
post 24.Aug.2010, 08:48 AM
Post #13
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Puffin,
what astounds me is that since the 2009 language laws Sweden passed, we are now seeing an ever increasing double barrel shot gun of wanting more people to come to sweden to boost the economy and at the same time offer these people less rights. (Not too dissimilar to Slavery of yesteryear).

For example :
Maths is Maths ... if it follows whatever guidelines set out by whatever government I cant see how in a country that has so many Languages (both national and international) how forcing such which clearly goes against he constitution is allowed to go un-challenged.

I recently know of a English lady who teaches in a school in stockholm who has started to retrain.
Ironically her UK qualifications in English (as in the subject of language) are not recognized, so this native Brit has had to go back to school in Sweden to get her qualifications in the subject of English Language. During her time there she noticed many social and gramatical errors such as : When writing to a potential employer always start off with "Dear Madam or Sir", when she brought this up to say actually its the other way around (regardless of what one may think is politically correct) She was told that she in fact was wrong and this is how they teach English.

Unfortunately, if you were a native English or American speaker and looked over how Sweden teaches English as a language you would find a huge amount of errors where national values have been inserted in an attempt to pervert or influence a subject, resulting in a huge array of direct conversions which make it Panglish or Pidgin rather than actual English. Its not just social errors but also understanding that English as a subject is very complicated to a non native and while you can get away with many short cuts to make yourself understood in English (example : I WOZ ERE) it doesn't mean that it is grammatically correct or acceptable.



In regards to your American friend who sucked at Swedish.
Yes I am sure that many bi-lingual school kids are often put at a disadvantage.
But this is because they are often all lumped together and tarred with the same brush.

Bi-lingual schools are destined to fail since they dont clearly specify which languages they operate in ... rather than a loose guideline of swedish and something else ... thus jumbling many languages together without any set guidelines that bear any relevance. A curriculum from skolverket that is vague to say the least and conflicts with government guidelines.

But generally I believe that bi-lingual schools dont know how to work with local authorities in an attempt to get the best from its children with international backgrounds. And since Swedish as a subject is more than just a language based subject it causes even more issues and puts even more problems up for kids.

Let me ask you this, why do you think there are no public English based language primary schools in Sweden? (its not because of lack of students either)

You can legally open a school in Sweden that uses Yiddish (although I am not sure how Skolverket would set out its guidelines for teaching students) as its a recognized language, whereas English (aka the majority language) is not allowed or shall we say that even if it was legal, it would nevr get the clearance to open.

But back on track,
There does seem to be a clear amount of double standards in the education sector based on race and background which IMHO has no right to be there. Education is exactly that and as long as you pay taxes I do not see why you should be refrained from services.


Again, Language doesn't define education ... its simply a way of conveying it.
Restricting Language is as stupid as telling a blind person they cant use brail, as they should learn to use Jedi mind tricks instead to read the text.
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Puffin
post 24.Aug.2010, 09:20 AM
Post #14
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE
I recently know of a English lady who teaches in a school in stockholm who has started to retrain.
Ironically her UK qualifications in English (as in the subject of language) are not recognized, so this native Brit has had to go back to school in Sweden to get her qualifications in the subject of English Language.


If she has University points in English then these are automatically recognised and can be counted to a Swedish teaching qualification - I've known many people do this from all countries

What is a problem is that some people think that they should automatically be able to be an *English teacher* because they speak English or have an A-level or an Art degree etc - however you need University points in English to be a formally registered teacher - although some of the lower end billigual schools seem to hire anyone with a pulse wink.gif

Just as my gymnasiet courses in Swedish don't qualify me to be a Swedish teacher cool.gif

QUOTE
In regards to your American friend who sucked at Swedish.
Yes I am sure that many bi-lingual school kids are often put at a disadvantage.
But this is because they are often all lumped together and tarred with the same brush.

Bi-lingual schools are destined to fail since they dont clearly specify which languages they operate in ... rather than a loose guideline of swedish and something else ... thus jumbling many languages together without any set guidelines that bear any relevance. A curriculum from skolverket that is vague to say the least and conflicts with government guidelines.

But generally I believe that bi-lingual schools dont know how to work with local authorities in an attempt to get the best from its children with international backgrounds. And since Swedish as a subject is more than just a language based subject it causes even more issues and puts even more problems up for kids.

Just to clarify - this WAS NOT a Swedish curriculum school - this was an IB school with a huge reputation in Stockholm
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Pursuivant
post 24.Aug.2010, 10:12 AM
Post #15
Joined: 12.Aug.2008

QUOTE
Labeling certain foreign teachers as "unqualified" because they dont have a Swedish language qualification to teach subjects which they may be qualified to do so in English is not really fair (especially if they are teaching that subject correctly but in English).


Claiming to be "qualified" if you are not just because you are let to teach in some other countries with knowing the alphabet by heart is not really fair to those QUALIFIED teachers that have a masters degree in their subject and have a minor in pedagogics. Not the Swedes' problem you can be taught in English-speaking countries by people who wouldn't even be let close to a school in Sweden is it?
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