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How to spell a telephone number in Swedish?

the right way to say a mobile number

Orwell1979
post 12.Aug.2015, 09:16 AM
Post #1
Joined: 4.Dec.2012

Hej!
I know there's a special way of saying your telephone (mobile) number in Swedish, but I can't remember.
If my number is for example 0766666666, how should I spell it? 07-66-666-666? (null-sju, sextiosex, sexhundra sextiosex, sexhundra sextiosex)
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DuneSunny2
post 12.Aug.2015, 11:53 AM
Post #2
Joined: 5.Aug.2014

076 6 66 66 66

Noll sju sex. Sex. Tre g?nger sextiosex.
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Emerentia
post 12.Aug.2015, 12:20 PM
Post #3
Joined: 23.Dec.2011

There is no special way to say a telephone number in Swedish. Feel free to say it how ever you want.

I would say that number as
0766 666 666 nollsjusexsex sexhundrasextisex sexhundrasextisex.
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Orwell1979
post 12.Aug.2015, 03:25 PM
Post #4
Joined: 4.Dec.2012

ok, thanks to both of you!
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ChocOwl
post 12.Aug.2015, 04:22 PM
Post #5
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telefonnummer#Sverige
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Hisingen
post 12.Aug.2015, 09:14 PM
Post #6
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

QUOTE (ChocOwl @ 12.Aug.2015, 03:22 PM) *

So says wikipedia, but in fact people usually say their telephone number in a way that is easy - to them. Mobile phones are a bit freer, also, since the first three figures often relate to the operator, and many then give the next three, followed by two plus two figures.
There is of late no fixed way, it often depends simply on the rhythm of the numbers and what feels easiest to the subscriber.

It is a far cry to the old days - in the UK for example - when you had the name of the exchange then your number. I used to call home from Sweden after my arrival back in the early 1960's, booking a call at the telegraph centre in Gbg, and waiting then for them to get the connection, and then being told to use this or that booth.

But just imagine how it was for the Swedish telephonist - my old home number was WOOLLEY 302, which in true English fashion I used to say as W (double U) double O, double L, E, Y, 302. It sure gave them problems! And then when the call was put through I could hear the operator in the Woolley exchange telling my Dad -"He's calling you from Sweden again Alb, and wants you to pay for the call." Those were te days when the exchange knew everything that was happening in the village.

I have in my car a real old souvenir from the days when petrol filling stations gave hand-outs. Mine is a yellow duster with the name of the ESSO fillng station and its telephone number 'Little Stukeley 590'. It was on the A14 beside RAF Alconbury, at the time a USAAF air base.

Those were the days. One thing that did transpire was that the name of the exchange only gave a rough idea of where the number was located. The Woolley exchange was in a little hamlet three miles away from my home village of Alconbury, out in the wilds.

Here in Sweden we can get a fair idea of where a land line is located, but with mobile phone numbers there is absolutely no clue.
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Hallander
post 15.Jun.2016, 04:18 PM
Post #7
Joined: 4.Mar.2009

Old thread with an advt link for Cialis that doesn't work.
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