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Swedish schools discipline & social media

Is Sweden strict enough?

Gjeebes
post 30.May.2016, 03:43 PM
Post #31
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

" It is important all children reach a certain standard and aren't left behind while teachers are trying to cultivate little geniuses."

Of course, was that even in question, at all, on this thread? How does nurturing "little geniuses" somehow automatically imply, in any way, anyone else should be left behind as a result? That's just a non-argument.

I find it quite bizarre the weird presumptions people come to on this topic. As if somehow having a student realise their potential, whatever that may be, is some kind of f'over to the child, and as if it must certainly be brought upon as some sort of punishment. Oh and let's not forget the obligatory, "all others are now doomed to be left behind".

If a wee child who wants to ride a bike, keeps falling off, do you say, oh, ok, you will never ride a bike, that's fine...or, do you encourage them by saying keep at it, don't worry, you can do it? And by working on that, with the child eventually succeeding, have you somehow magically left behind all other children, whom still cannot ride a bike? That way of thinking makes no sense whatsoever! Is helping the child to succeed just a disguised punishment? Obviously not, but this seems to be the mentality in Sweden!

As for uni, sure, not everyone is meant for it, no problem. And as it is, there are far too many graduates, at least at the PhD level. But if you do go to uni, it shouldn't be some kind of watered down version of high-school, since that is not its purpose. And if it is, you are being robbed, and being given a false sense of competitiveness.

Most students I see, put as little effort into their studies as possible, and then complain when they don't get what they feel entitled to have. Not all are like this, of course, but many are. It is actually like dealing with high-school mentality children, complete with angry parents visiting to influence their child's graded performance.
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get_a_lawyer
post 30.May.2016, 06:44 PM
Post #32
Joined: 19.Nov.2015

As for the Swedish system promoting equity, yes, that may be a goal, but it is not an outcome (at least not relative to other countries, let's not just compare to the UK here):

"The Swedish system is there to bring everyone up to the same common denominator ("godkänd is good enough"). "

Please take a look at Figure 1.8 in this report:
http://www.oecd.org/edu/school/Improving-S...s-in-Sweden.pdf

Sweden is worse than Estonia, Finland, Japan, Korea and Canada (note Canada is a multi-cultural society, so equality cannot be explained through cultural homogeneity) in a ranking of equality AND worse in mathematics performance.

One may argue that 'at least no-one is left behind', but that is not what the PISA data is telling us. Students are being left behind, both the exceptional (and highly-motivated) and the ones who are not. They are not bringing everyone up to the same low goal.

Take a look at the TIMSS results for maths:
http://timssandpirls.bc.edu/timss2011/down...cs_FullBook.pdf


Page 63, Exhibit 1.8 for Sweden. The worrying problem for Sweden is that the results have shown a significant decline (in maths) from 1995 to 2011.
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Gjeebes
post 30.May.2016, 08:06 PM
Post #33
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

QUOTE (get_a_lawyer @ 30.May.2016, 05:44 PM) *
As for the Swedish system promoting equity, yes, that may be a goal, but it is not an outcome (at least not relative to other countries, let's not just compare to the UK h ... (show full quote)

Well, ya, and there's that, which just makes the whole story even sadder.

But you know, the former "Eastern-bloc" nations still thought the West was crap, while they waited 2 days for a loaf of bread...so I am guessing things will have to slide all the way to the bottom in Meatballia, before anyone will listen to common sense.
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morningstar
post 25.Feb.2018, 03:58 PM
Post #34
Joined: 25.Feb.2018

I have just moved to Sweden. I do not speak Swedish yet but I am being offered the chance to teach English in Northern Sweden's rural areas.

What are the downsides to being a teacher in Sweden?

What are the good sides to being a teacher in Sweden?

I would really like to know so that I can make an informed decision.

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies.
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intrepidfox
post 25.Feb.2018, 06:15 PM
Post #35
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Jul.2012

QUOTE (morningstar @ 25.Feb.2018, 03:58 PM) *
I have just moved to Sweden. I do not speak Swedish yet but I am being offered the chance to teach English in Northern Sweden's rural areas.What are the downsides to being ... (show full quote)


2 conflicting posts. first you have lived here 3 years and then just moved here
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Savage
post 25.Feb.2018, 11:56 PM
Post #36
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

The Local has a long history of fake posters, which help to boost the board with attempts at controversial posts, when they need to increase visitor numbers etc. Which is good for when selling your wares to advertisers.
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