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UK the Nany state?

Puffin
post 14.Mar.2007, 11:51 AM
Post #1
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

The UK is planning to extend its National Curriculum for schools to include the under fives.

Communication skills of babies between birth and 11 months will assess babbling and gurgling.

By the age of 4 nursery/childminding staff must assess all children's National Curriculum progress with 117 boxes to tick on points covering reading/writing/ maths and communication skills.

What do you think? A useful check on standards or big brother taking over?
http://education.independent.co.uk/news/article2355959.ece
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VikingHumpingWitch
post 14.Mar.2007, 11:57 AM
Post #2
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 21.Dec.2005

I appreciate that something needs to be done about British education because frankly, there are far too many thickies kicking around the place, but I can't see how this is going to make British kids any happier which is also important.

Anyway, everyone knows that kids (except of course your own) are basically rubbish until they learn to talk, so what's the point assessing them?
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Webby
post 14.Mar.2007, 12:12 PM
Post #3
Joined: 14.May.2006

From primary school (and now it seems pre-school) all the way up to higher education the education in the UK is substandard - and what education does exists is now overly assessment-geared... meaning people no longer see the value in learning for it's own sake. Rather education has instead become merely a means for people to become employable and so contribute to the economy. Ultimatelly leading to a generation of content-free zombies, who are uncritical of the system, and who find solice in a materialistic and debt-ridden standard of living. Welcome to not so Great Britain in the 21st century.
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Puffin
post 14.Mar.2007, 12:34 PM
Post #4
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

The target and tick box control systems over education in the UK seem more appropriate to factory work than pre-school. The target has become more important than the education provided. It seems to have affected the whole education system.

There seems to be no room for spontineity anywhere in the curriculum and no place for learning for enjoyment. When I was a kid - if it was a sunny day we would often go and do stuff outside - but now it would be considered wrong - a departure from the planning/ you'd need to carry out a prior risk assessment. Many kids get turned off school and give up trying!

It has also introduced the idea of teaching to the test and spoon feeding to maximise the number of passes. There was a discussion in the UK press last year about English literture at high school does not require students to read whole books - instead they study extracts and ke quotations needed for the exam.

There was a case this week of a teacher having his licence suspended as under pressure to to get a certain percentage of passes he wrote students examination course work for them. It is accepted practice in many schools for teachers to allow pupils to submit "drafts" of their texts which the teachers then provide comments and guidence on before the the final version is submitted and sent to the exam board.

All this feeds into higher education where many students are unprepared for independent study such as reading and research. There has been many complaints in the press from Uni students and their parents about how few hours many get - perhaps only 4-8 for discursive subjects such as history, literature or politics. The question is who many hours should you expect?

The problems of the spoon feeding/teaching to the test generation were brought home when I was watching the weakest link. One of the contestants was an English Literture student from Kent. Anne made her usual comments about students and then the conversation proceeded as follows with no hint of inrony/joking:
Anne: English literture then - you must do a lot of reading?
Student: No not really
Anne: Really - how come - surely you must read a lot of books.
Student: No - I get what I need for the exams from my lectures and seminars

So there you have it - possible to get an English literature degree without reading books - sums up many of the problems with UK education - but then again in round 2 - she was the weakest link.
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Streja
post 14.Mar.2007, 08:01 PM
Post #5
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Really Puffin? FOR REAL? That's SO weird... sad.gif

I had to read a lot of books when I studied English at uni here...and I loved it!
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ammie
post 14.Mar.2007, 08:16 PM
Post #6
Joined: 12.Feb.2007

There also talking about making it compulsory for 7 -14 year olds to learn a foreign language, bet its french.

hehe i remember when my a friend of mine had her first baby, the health visiter gave her a book for the baby at her 6 week check up wtf?
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Streja
post 14.Mar.2007, 08:39 PM
Post #7
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Well we have cumpolsary second languages from the age of 12... hmm?
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Puffin
post 15.Mar.2007, 09:40 AM
Post #8
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (ammie)
There also talking about making it compulsory for 7 -14 year olds to learn a foreign language, bet its french.

hehe i remember when my a friend of mine had her first baby, the health visiter gave her a book for the baby at her 6 week check up wtf?


What is really weird is that the government dropped the requirement that languages should be compulsory after the age of 14. So many pupils do not have any foreign languages at GCSE (grunskolexamen) and relatively few take languages at AS/A2 level.
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Jasoncarter
post 15.Mar.2007, 11:35 AM
Post #9
Joined: 1.Aug.2006

I'm quite tickled that the subject of this thread, wondering if the UK needs to raise its education standards, has been spelled incorrectly...
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Puffin
post 15.Mar.2007, 11:43 AM
Post #10
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

O ha ha ha

very funny that since I had major wrist surgery I make some typos as I have lost some use of my right hand.
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*incitatus*
post 15.Mar.2007, 12:02 PM
Post #11


There's potential for a joke here, but I'm not going there...
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