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"Good at languages"

08
post 4.Sep.2006, 02:44 AM
Post #31
Joined: 13.Aug.2006

Stop it, you're making me go into a dreamy stare biggrin.gif
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007
post 4.Sep.2006, 07:25 AM
Post #32
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (08)
Point to where in my post, I was talking about perfection? I only pointed a finger in the direction of the large group of people that use excuses to explain why they can't learn a language when simple elbow grease will do the trick.


what large group of people are using this as an excuse for not learning a language, specifically swedish?
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007
post 4.Sep.2006, 07:28 AM
Post #33
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Torque)
Gulp! So you're saying that an average person shouldn't expect to sound any better than a young child after 5-8 years? Or have I misunderstood?


actually, a 5-8 year old child knows the language rather well. they only differ in their cognitive ability to reason etc. so linguistically, the language skills are comparable.

i would love to be at a 5-year old's language level in any language i would like to learn.

of course i'd like to hope i could maintain my adult intellect's level :wink:
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007
post 4.Sep.2006, 07:32 AM
Post #34
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (08)
I know a German guy here in Spain. He's lived here 16 years . He thinks and speaks in Spanish but he's still got a thick german accent.


are you suggesting an accent disqualifies language ability?
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08
post 4.Sep.2006, 07:34 AM
Post #35
Joined: 13.Aug.2006

[quote="007"][quote=08]
what large group of people are using this as an excuse for not learning a language, specifically swedish?[/quote]

Allright, it was a bit general. To be specific, I mean all the people I've met here in Barcelona (from many different western countries) who only hang out with english speakers and then complain they don't learn the language.
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007
post 4.Sep.2006, 07:55 AM
Post #36
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

08, i totally agree with you.

if people just make the effort they can learn the language. some will do it faster, some can reach a higher level, but to communicate in a language you need to reach a pretty basic level only.

then once you can do it, the more you do, the better you get.

hijack...since you're in barcelona can you recommend an area to find a hotel. i was there ages and ages ago and the last time was just to drive to a wedding near andorra...zip in and out. this time the wedding is in barcelona.
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VikingHumpingWitch
post 4.Sep.2006, 08:07 AM
Post #37
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 21.Dec.2005

QUOTE (Aneud)
As for the topic, yes it does take a "knack". You knew quite a bit before you arrived though, didn't you, VHW? I didn't really but I can completely sympathize with the fact that it's one thing to express yourself in Swedish and quite another one to express what you meant with accuracy and a wealth of vocabulary. For now I'm just content I understand over 80% and can reply in understandable terms smile.gif


I taught myself for years, on and off (with the last year in London being On in a sort of panic way). By the time we left London I could speak in Swedish at home with my Swede, but with other Swedes could only really bring myself to say set phrases that I was confident in. I am amazed how much quicker I learn here, I knew it would be easier but it still astonishes me.

If you've only been here a few months and can understand most of what you hear, it sounds like you're doing really well! Good luck with the job.
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Puffin
post 4.Sep.2006, 09:57 AM
Post #38
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

I am no good at languages (still have my school reports that emphasize this fact) - but I think that you can get a long way with motivation and hard work when you live in another country.

If you have a Swedish partner then this is a major resource. I don't have this as my man is also an immigrant - I also speak English at home as part of my objective of having bi-lingual children. However I did attend an SFI class where we only conversed in Swedish - I think that forced me to attempt to speak Swedish however badly!

I wrote a group essay on SFI as part of my University course. The research that we did into second language acquistion shows that up to mid-20s you have a great chance of becoming fluent but it start's to decline steeply after that and becomes very difficult to learn a new language after 30.

The thing that I find most frustrating is writing!
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*Torque*
post 4.Sep.2006, 01:47 PM
Post #39


007, Thanks for the clarification. Puffin, I'm in my forties!!!

I am about half way through a German translation of an Italian mystery, from the Inspector Montalbo series by Andrea Camilleri. I've had two semesters of German classes and I haven't looked at German all summer. Anyway, I am reading it without use of the dictionary because otherwise it would take forever to make any progress. The great thing is that after a few chapters, certain words "find" sense, even if I haven't translated them.

Actually, my not using the dictionary is about being very, very lazy right now, as I do think it's helpful to use it at least now and then. Anyway, this mystery is diffent to others I've read in that Montalbo, a policeman, is actually out solving many different cases, rather than focusing on one murder. At first I thought that I had really lost the plot, but I kept reading, and the murders kept changing, so I finally realized that this was just a different sort of mystery.

Anyway, I concur with VHW that reading is a great way to extend your vocabulary. I wouldn't have learned "Arseloch" or "Sheisekerl" in class! laugh.gif

The book, if anybody can enlighten me that I really am misreading it, is called "Die Nacht des einsamen Traumers."
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Nuname
post 4.Sep.2006, 03:32 PM
Post #40
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Apr.2005

QUOTE (VikingHumpingWitch)
I taught myself for years, on and off (with the last year in London being On in a sort of panic way). By the time we left London I could speak in Swedish at home with my Swede, but with other Swedes could only really bring myself to say set phrases that I was confident in. I am amazed how much quicker I learn here, I knew it would be easier but it still astonishes me.

If you've only been here a few months and can understand most of what you hear, it sounds like you're doing really well! Good luck with the job.


I think you need a combination of natural talent & hard work, unfortunately I'm lacking in both. I can work out your taxes for you though, if you ask me in English smile.gif
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Braderunner Rennuredarb
post 4.Sep.2006, 03:48 PM
Post #41
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 24.May.2005

QUOTE (Nuname)
I think you need a combination of natural talent & hard work, unfortunately I'm lacking in both...
You have talents in drinking beer!
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Nuname
post 4.Sep.2006, 04:07 PM
Post #42
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Apr.2005

QUOTE (.jason - "he .say .you .braderunner")
You have talents in drinking beer!


No I have a talent in not knowing when to stop. Something I shall be working on this Friday.
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08
post 4.Sep.2006, 05:18 PM
Post #43
Joined: 13.Aug.2006

QUOTE (007)
hijack...since you're in barcelona can you recommend an area to find a hotel. i was there ages and ages ago and the last time was just to drive to a wedding near andorra...zip in and out. this time the wedding is in barcelona.


Sorry 007, but I've never stayed in a hotel here. I've always had an apartment :-/
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007
post 4.Sep.2006, 07:53 PM
Post #44
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (08)
Sorry 007, but I've never stayed in a hotel here. I've always had an apartment :-/


thanks anyway...
any area you think i should avoid? or aim for? ..in general
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*Torque*
post 4.Sep.2006, 10:09 PM
Post #45


Good question to ask, 007. My experience of the big cities in Spain was that you could be in a dangerous area in just a minute on your way somewhere at night. From good to bad in no time. I suppose it's that way in every large city, but you know where not to go if you're familiar with a city.
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