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"Good at languages"

08
post 5.Sep.2006, 07:42 PM
Post #46
Joined: 13.Aug.2006

There are no dangerous areas in Barcelona.

Everything is pretty close here so it doesn't really matter too much where you live. It doesn't have really bad neighbourhoods or anything like that so I'd say: wherever.
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Roowhip
post 5.Sep.2006, 10:13 PM
Post #47
Joined: 16.Sep.2005

I would agree that it is mostly a natural knack although anyone can learn with a bit of effort. Obviously it is easier to learn as a child (my daughter was fluent within 6 months of arriving here and constantly correcting me). It also seems to be easier for those that already have a few languages under their belt from earlier in life. I had never learnt a foreign language before arriving here and since I arrived with 2 young children, we speak english in the home although hearing my husband speak Swedish (even in Australia) helped somewhat. For me, the steep learning curve was when I started working and was forced to speak Swedish (and in my second job write lots..not sure how I passed the written test to get that job when I realised what it entailed afterwards :roll: ).


QUOTE
it's also unfortunate that often swedes confuse pronunciation with ability in a language. just because you don't sound native doesn't mean you haven't mastered a language.


Not sure if it's unfortuante or not...but this has certainly been the case for me too. I have always been good at picking up accents and pronounciation and so after a very short time, like you have mentioned 007, people would think I was much better than I actually was..although I can't complain as it did get me a good job quite early (and then I was dropped in the deep end..)
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Daevyd
post 7.Sep.2006, 07:43 PM
Post #48
Joined: 11.Aug.2006

QUOTE (High Priestess Kang)
I think the key to learning languages is starting at a very young age. I started learning a second language when I seven or eight (I cannot remember exactly). Fortunately for me, it was Hebrew so I had to not only learn the language, I had to master a different alphabet and reading and writing from right to left. After that, every other language I have studied has come to me relatively easy.


Absolutely, it's best when you're young. I've been playing with Finnish quite a bit, but it doesn't come as quickly to me as studying languages a good number of years ago did. Of course, it doesn't help that it's quite difficult and alien to virtually anyone outside of Finland, Estonia and the Komi Republic.

QUOTE
I am such a nerd, I read grammar and style books for pleasure.


Oh dear, I thought I was the only person who had sunk to that level!! It's ironic that I have to learn a language almost as if it's algebra or trigonometry in order to "get it". Sitting around and listening to it without knowing its grammar doesn't do me much good.
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*Move*
post 7.Sep.2006, 07:46 PM
Post #49


QUOTE (007)
thanks anyway...
any area you think i should avoid? or aim for? ..in general


try sants estacion area...avoid old part town...
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007
post 7.Sep.2006, 09:50 PM
Post #50
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Move)
try sants estacion area...avoid old part town...


thanks.

i've been getting the feeling that the old part of town is tourist trap city. it seems so different from when i visited 15 years ago.

i also read that some hotels have "weekend special" prices that compare with some of the smaller hotels, but i haven't found any offers... maybe the train station area is a good bet...no turists on weekends, no business people either.

it's not helping that barcelona has a home game the day after we arrive.
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High Priestess Kang - Slu...
post 7.Sep.2006, 11:03 PM
Post #51
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 14.Jul.2006

QUOTE (Daevyd)
Absolutely, it's best when you're young. I've been playing with Finnish quite a bit, but it doesn't come as quickly to me as studying languages a good number of years ago did. Of course, it doesn't help that it's quite difficult and alien to virtually anyone outside of Finland, Estonia and the Komi Republic.


You should find Zill (otherwise known as Zillicious). He speaks Finnish, as well.

QUOTE (Daevyd)
Oh dear, I thought I was the only person who had sunk to that level!! It's ironic that I have to learn a language almost as if it's algebra or trigonometry in order to "get it". Sitting around and listening to it without knowing its grammar doesn't do me much good.


Thank G-d I'm not alone. I spent one Saturday evening trolling a bookstore looking for a grammar manual. And...I was enjoying it!

I cannot imagine learning a language with the phonic methodology. I do not want to be illiterate. Nor do I want to miss any subtleties lost by not having a full understanding of grammar.

Maybe it is because I majored in French...the language with a zillion verb tenses.
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Daevyd
post 8.Sep.2006, 09:48 PM
Post #52
Joined: 11.Aug.2006

QUOTE (High Priestess Kang)
You should find Zill (otherwise known as Zillicious). He speaks Finnish, as well.


Oh, I'm nowhere near good enough to be classified as "speaking" it. But I can sit there and identify up to 10 grammatical cases by now. laugh.gif The sounds of it is truly fascinating.

QUOTE
Thank G-d I'm not alone. I spent one Saturday evening trolling a bookstore looking for a grammar manual.
laugh.gif

Yes, I know the feeling only too well.

HPK, Mizh inshym, meni zdajetsja, shcho ty ranishe troshki napisala pro Ukrajinu, chy ni? Mozhlivo, ja pomykajusja.
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High Priestess Kang - Slu...
post 8.Sep.2006, 10:40 PM
Post #53
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 14.Jul.2006

QUOTE (Daevyd)
HPK, Mizh inshym, meni zdajetsja, shcho ty ranishe troshki napisala pro Ukrajinu, chy ni? Mozhlivo, ja pomykajusja.


Hmmmm...I cannot figure this out since I recognize no roots, but I am assuming this is Ukrainian. Shame on me for not knowing the language of my descent.
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Ezpen The Caveman
post 8.Sep.2006, 10:43 PM
Post #54
Joined: 27.Oct.2005

QUOTE (Kitten)
That's interesting. Whenever I've heard the Romanian language it's always reminded me vaguely of Italian. Romanian, French, Italian, and Spanish are all Romantic Languages so they all sound kind of similar.

So I guess Swedish is a Germantic Language?? :?
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Chrisrolinski
post 8.Sep.2006, 10:58 PM
Post #55
Joined: 7.Jun.2006

[size=18][/size]

I only know a basic level of Swedish at the momment, and still struggle with pronounciation but I'm only 23 and with hope I can reach the point of having a decent conversational level by the time I am 30. That is my big aim. I'll have finished my PhD by then and with hope will move to lovely Sverige.

So people...seven years to improve...
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Chrisrolinski
post 8.Sep.2006, 11:07 PM
Post #56
Joined: 7.Jun.2006

[size=18][/size]

I liked the post somebody wrote about 'acting'...I have started to use certain stock phrases in emails and sms messages with friends (who have been to Sweden or know of my obsession) to help my learn and I suppose act...well all enjoy it...and Hej! Vi ses and God Kvall have now become stock social phrases. Little Sweden in Manchester!
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Daevyd
post 9.Sep.2006, 12:32 PM
Post #57
Joined: 11.Aug.2006

QUOTE (High Priestess Kang)
Hmmmm...I cannot figure this out since I recognize no roots, but I am assuming this is Ukrainian. Shame on me for not knowing the language of my descent.


Yes, it is. I thought I had read somewhere that you were from Ukraine, but I see that it is your descent. Sorry for the mix-up.
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High Priestess Kang - Slu...
post 9.Sep.2006, 04:40 PM
Post #58
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 14.Jul.2006

QUOTE (Daevyd)
Yes, it is. I thought I had read somewhere that you were from Ukraine, but I see that it is your descent. Sorry for the mix-up.


My mormor is from the Ukraine. Unfortunately, like most immigrants in that generation, they withheld their language from their offspring in an effort to assimilate.

All that we were taught at home was yiddish. And it was taught sparingly, at that.

Would you tell me what you said? I studied Russian for one term in school and never progressed far enough to learn the basic roots of slavic languages.
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Daevyd
post 10.Sep.2006, 12:17 PM
Post #59
Joined: 11.Aug.2006

QUOTE (High Priestess Kang)
Would you tell me what you said? I studied Russian for one term in school and never progressed far enough to learn the basic roots of slavic languages.


Yes, indeed, HPK.

I said: By the way, it seems to me that you wrote a little bit about Ukraine earlier, didn't you? Perhaps, I'm mistaken.

If you're keeping tabs in Russian, I think it would be: Mjezhdu prochim, mnje kazhetsja, chto ty ranshee nemnozhko napisala o Ukraine, njet? Mozhet byt', ja oshibajus'.

You can clearly see the similar structure and some of the roots here.

The Slavic languages are all quite similar, with Russian sort of being the odd man out in terms of vocabulary especially. I'm not actually a Slav, but after studying Ukrainian I found I could get the gist of any conversation from Serbian-Croatian northwards to Polish and especially Slovak. My earlier knowledge of Russian couldn't do the same for me. I found a tendency, however, for many Slavic peoples to "pretend" that they don't know anything at all of what another Slavic group is saying.
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