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IB grade expectations

Kitturn
post 31.Oct.2006, 10:31 PM
Post #1
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

Hi,
I currently live in the UK, studying the International Baccalaureate diploma program. I do higher: English (first language), German (second language), Psychology and History. Standard: Maths methods and Biology. I am also learning Swedish (ish!!!), with the hope of doing a law degree in Sweden starting in 2008. I am having huge problems with finding anything out. I would ideally like to do a law degree taught in English (if such a course exists), or if this is not possible, a course taught in Swedish, after fairly intensive learning!!! I can not find any guide to what grades I could be expected to achieve, other than I need to pass the TISUS test. Please help!!!
Thank you biggrin.gif
Kitten
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Shark99 - The Great Catsb...
post 31.Oct.2006, 10:38 PM
Post #2
Joined: 11.Aug.2005

Good luck with your IB exam, I took the IB years ago, those were the days. May I ask why you would want to do your law degree in Sweden and not in the UK? I don't know if there are whole law programs taught in English in Sweden, I know that there are quite a few classes taught in English, but certainly not the majority.
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Kitturn
post 31.Oct.2006, 10:43 PM
Post #3
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

Thankies. I specifically dont want to stay in the UK, especially England. I want to travel, and uni seems the ideal oppertunity. However if I get into Oxford I'll probably stay for mums sake (she wants me to go Oxbridge) but otherwise I'm off! Sweden specifically because I've sort of falled in love with the country, although I am also considering Austria.
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Kitturn
post 31.Oct.2006, 10:46 PM
Post #4
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

Am I safe in expecting an offer of 35-39 ish points? (Out of 45) That is about average for the places I've looked at in the UK
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Puffin
post 31.Oct.2006, 11:13 PM
Post #5
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

I think that you are going to struggle to find an Undergraduate Law Course taught in English - what would you use it for as most University courses are geared to the JurKand degree - the main law qualification in sweden that takes 4½ years studied by Swedish law students. It is usually only after year three that you can take courses in English on comparative and internation law. You can read about Swedish Law degrees here:
http://resources.jur.uu.se/repository/5/PD...ns_to_study.pdf

However it would be difficult to obtain a Law degree in Sweden without speaking Swedish - if you did not have a very competent knowledge of the language you would not be able to find work in Sweden. Also it is common for Swedish students to carry out practical placements in their final year as the basis of their dissertation.

If you study Law in the UK then there are many opportunities to come to Sweden as an international exchange student.
http://www.jur.uu.se/modules/dokument/visa...d=370&lvl=2
http://student2.jur.uu.se/modules/public/p...d=404&lvl=1

If you studied in Sweden you would also need to consider how you would finance yourself. EU citizens have to have a period of residence in Sweden before they are eligible for Swedish study support. You would need about £600 per month to get by as a student.

The admission points that you require depends very much on where you want to go. The "oxbridge" type Universities in Sweden for example Uppsala, Lund, Gothenburg demand higher grades than lesser known ones - however you should have the highest grades. You would need to get your qualifications assessed by the Swedish University admissions agency before you could apply for a Swedish degree programme - it is normally a requirement that you have the Swedish University Entrance level in Swedish language:
www.vhs.se
http://www.vhs.se/upload/antagning/Utland/06%20IB.pdf

I hope that this has been of some help.
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Kitturn
post 1.Nov.2006, 07:01 PM
Post #6
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

THANK YOU!!!
Kind of a depressing read, but I not atleast have something to work from.
Maybe a better option would be to take a gap year in Sweden, so I have a chance to learn the language, then apply a year late. Or take an intensive course? Is that likely to be possible? But then finding a job is still a problem. sad.gif Why is it all so difficult? Atleast I have over a year to get organised.
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Puffin
post 1.Nov.2006, 10:33 PM
Post #7
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

I'm still not too clear how you would finance your studies in Sweden? Were you planning to finance yourself or will your parents pay for your upkeep?

Although there are no University fees (at the moment) in Sweden you still need to fins around £6000 per month for the 10 months of term for the 4½ years of the Juris Kandidat. As an foreign EU citizen you would not be eligble for Swedish student grants and loans until you had become a resident and worked in Sweden for around 2 years. Therefore unless your parents are going support you you are unlikely to be able to get finance before 2008 at the earliest.

Theere is also the issue of learning Swedish to A level standard - the level required for University entrance. If you are very gifted at languages you might be able to complete this task in a year of intensive full time study - perhaps you could manage this with your IB background - however the average time to get TISUS/SVenskaB (depedning on which route you take) is around 2-4 years.

I don't mean to be discouraging - it is not impossible to get to University in Sweden - I have myself done this and taken a degree at a Swedish Uni and am currently studying for a PhD - but you should be prepared for the amount of time that it takes and that it may not be as straight forward as you think.

I hope this is helpful
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Loke
post 2.Nov.2006, 12:01 PM
Post #8
Joined: 26.Oct.2005

Puffin's covered most of the bases there (I tip my hat good sir), though you could try and get in touch with the individual universities' international office - they can generally give you an idea of what grades are needed in order to study law (NB - the grades'll still need to go via VHS, as Puffin pointed out).

Be prepared for it to not go too soothly - my life was made extremely difficult by Umeå Uni.s incompetent international admissions officer, but thankfully I got hold of the international guidance counselor (studievägledare) who was the very model of professionalism.


Puff - £600 a month?! One of us was leading the high life :wink:
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Kitturn
post 2.Nov.2006, 12:49 PM
Post #9
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

After just having had a careers interview, I've had a bit of a change of plan. I now hope to spend a year (possibly 2 if I discover I'm a slow learner) working as an au pair, or something like that. In which time I would plan to learn the language. However I hear this is still quite difficult, something about au pairs not being so popular. I would be spending as much of my free time as possible learning Swedish.

I wouldnt describe myself as an unusually talented linguist, (I got a B in GCSE German- after 2 years self taught, which seems like the closest to compair with) However I am prepaired to work very hard for it. I am currently doing about 2 hours a day 5 days a week of Swedish, which envolves speaking to the Swedes in my class, using a teach yourself book and CD, trying to write MSN conversations with some very patient people I met on holiday and watching disney movies.

Off topic, but if anyone knows of any other (non-disney) movies in Swedish that are easy-ish to get hold of in England, please let me know, I'm getting bored of The Lion King and the such like.

If the test is that hard, am I likely to pass it after a year in Sweden of fairly hard work? And I still have almost 2 years here, doing the above.

Puffin (I think) you say there are no tuition fees for international students yet, is this likely to change before 2009?

Funding being at uni is something that isn't compleatly decided. If I stay here and get into any of the top 10 uni s my parents will have to 100% support me, as having a job is basically banned for anyone on a course of more than 20hrs uni related work (including not taught) a week. But I dont think they are so keen on the idea!!! I guess this isn't the case for Sweden? The stuff I have been given from the careers adviser says I should be expecting to live on about £440 a month, about 6000 Kronor. Is this out of date?

Sorry it's so long, and Thank You very much everyone who has helped me already biggrin.gif
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Kitturn
post 2.Nov.2006, 12:53 PM
Post #10
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

Loke- what is VHS? I have been lead to believe that I will have to send my applications to the Swedish Embassy who will pass them on to universities. Is this not what you did?

Also, should I write emails or proper letters to the international offices? and should they be in Swedish or English? Are the grade expectations about the same every year? As I'm not panning on going for a while yet, so is it worth me contacting them now?

Sorry so many questions!
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Puffin
post 2.Nov.2006, 04:46 PM
Post #11
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

OK - quite a bit of confusion here: I don't think that the international office would be relevant here as I understood that you were planning to take a Swedish degree - not come as an intenational exchange student for a term or two.

There are 2 different systems

1. if you come as an international exchange student - this is usually for a year or 2 max or a Masters programme - for these courses you have to apply directly to a university - international courses are usually taught in English but usually do not lead to a Swedish undergraduate degree or professional qualifications. The international office administer these. If you chose to do a UK law degree you could possible come to Sweden for a year as an international exchange student: There was an article in the Telegraph this week about a Law student from Keele who did 6 months in Gothenburg as an exchange student - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/main...28/ixtetop.html - the only problem is that it won't qualify you to practice law in Sweden.

2. As you is looking to do a whole law degree you would need to apply in the same way as ordinary Swedish students do via VHS (it's like the Swedish version of UCAS) however as you have foreign school qualifications you would need to have your FINAL IB certificate accredited prior to applying for law degrees - in Sweden course offers are made on the basis of actual results and not predictions as in the UK. When you have completed your IB and have moved to Sweden you would need to send your IB certificate off to VHS to be converted into into "SWedish style" grades and points (this process can take around 6 months) - only when you have done this and learned Swedish would you be eligible to apply for degree courses.

It might be a good idea for you to contact VHS to find out whether your subject mix is OK for law: You can send them an e-mail in English
http://www.vhs.se/templates/Page.aspx?id=1002

Another good idea woud be to write in english a brief letter to some of the better law departments explaining your situation and asking for some advice:

I've listed some of the better known departments here - go in on "staff" and scroll down to the admin staff and look for someone who is a "studievägledare" which is a student guidance counseelor who advises students on courses and admissions etc - or use the "contact us".

Uppsala Univesiity - faculty of Law http://www.jur.uu.se/default.aspx?lang=Eng

Lund University faculty of Law: http://www.jur.lu.se/internet/english/home.nsf

Gothenburg University faculty of Law:
http://www.hgu.gu.se/item.aspx?id=1012

Stockholm Universisty faculty of Law
http://www.juridicum.su.se/jurweb/default.asp?lang=eng

Umeå University faculty of Law
http://www.jus.umu.se/index_eng.html
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Puffin
post 2.Nov.2006, 04:50 PM
Post #12
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

On the fees front I doubt that there will be charges for EU students in the short term - but Sweden has just got a new Conservative government in September so there may be some changes - there is a plan to charge students from outside the EU. If you live in Sweden for the 2 years you will be regarded as a Swedish resident.
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Loke
post 2.Nov.2006, 05:04 PM
Post #13
Joined: 26.Oct.2005

QUOTE (Puffin)
OK - quite a bit of confusion here: I don't think that the international office would be relevant here as I understood that you were planning to take a Swedish degree - not come as an intenational exchange student for a term or two.

There are 2 different systems

1. if you come as an international exchange student - this is usually for a year or 2 max or a Masters programme - for these courses you have to apply directly to a university - international courses are usually taught in English but usually do not lead to a Swedish undergraduate degree or professional qualifications. The international office administer these. If you chose to do a UK law degree you could possible come to Sweden for a year as an international exchange student: There was an article in the Telegraph this week about a Law student from Keele who did 6 months in Gothenburg as an exchange student - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/main...28/ixtetop.html - the only problem is that it won't qualify you to practice law in Sweden.

2. As you is looking to do a whole law degree you would need to apply in the same way as ordinary Swedish students do via VHS (it's like the Swedish version of UCAS) however as you have foreign school qualifications you would need to have your FINAL IB certificate accredited prior to applying for law degrees - in Sweden course offers are made on the basis of actual results and not predictions as in the UK. When you have completed your IB and have moved to Sweden you would need to send your IB certificate off to VHS to be converted into into "SWedish style" grades and points (this process can take around 6 months) - only when you have done this and learned Swedish would you be eligible to apply for degree courses.

It might be a good idea for you to contact VHS to find out whether your subject mix is OK for law: You can send them an e-mail in English
http://www.vhs.se/templates/Page.aspx?id=1002

Another good idea woud be to write in english a brief letter to some of the better law departments explaining your situation and asking for some advice:

I've listed some of the better known departments here - go in on "staff" and scroll down to the admin staff and look for someone who is a "studievägledare" which is a student guidance counseelor who advises students on courses and admissions etc - or use the "contact us".

Uppsala Univesiity - faculty of Law http://www.jur.uu.se/default.aspx?lang=Eng

Lund University faculty of Law: http://www.jur.lu.se/internet/english/home.nsf

Gothenburg University faculty of Law:
http://www.hgu.gu.se/item.aspx?id=1012

Stockholm Universisty faculty of Law
http://www.juridicum.su.se/jurweb/default.asp?lang=eng

Umeå University faculty of Law
http://www.jus.umu.se/index_eng.html


I agree that all non-exchange students have to go via VHS, but (atleast at Umeå uni) there are people that work with these issues and have info about them (ie - a honking great folder with what grades are required, plus other requirements, eg. samhällskunskap for many social sciences). Though these people may not work under the umbrella of the international office, the people working there tend to be able to put you in touch with them. Getting in touch with the institution tends to result in getting useful info about the course, but not about the entry requirements - as they don't deal with that side of things. The standard answer from VHS (at least for me and those I've spoken to) is: "send in the documents and we'll tell you" - not too helpful when you've not got them yet and would like to know what you have to aim for and if it's realistic. Whereas the people working at the uni do have that info (at least the international student counsellor did, plus he gave me a whole bunch of useul info about learning Swedish etc.).
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Kitturn
post 2.Nov.2006, 07:52 PM
Post #14
Joined: 26.Oct.2006

I can't email the VHS as it doesn't accept my email, and keeps returning it saying:

Ange ditt personnummer med formen ååmmdd-nnnn.
Saknar du svenskt personnummer,
ange födelsedatum med 6 siffror.

Which I dont properly understand.
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Puffin
post 2.Nov.2006, 08:25 PM
Post #15
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

OK it's asking you for your Swedish civic registration number - you dont exist here without it

If you dont have one you should give your date of birth backwards - year last 2 digits, month 2 digits, date etc
YYMMDD
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