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Family friendly Sweden??

007
post 16.Aug.2006, 10:14 AM
Post #16
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Puffin)
:wink: :wink: What you really want is a child with a minor disability that prevents them from attending daycare. There was a Swedish woman at the baby group I attended who had a child with asthma and allergies - she got a carers allowance of 8500/month to stay at home until her child started school.


that's great if you want to stay home... i just like a day off here and there. and as much of my work can be done evenings or nights, i can usually catch up easily without missing a beat or losing a krona.
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Thread Killer
post 16.Aug.2006, 10:19 AM
Post #17
Joined: 16.Aug.2005

you get more försäkringskassa (that means money)if you've been working first. I think it's 8 months employment and you get 80% of your salary.
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Parden Me
post 20.Aug.2006, 10:34 AM
Post #18
Joined: 9.Apr.2005

Just a small question, I may be old fashioned but all the information here is about daycare etc etc what happened to having a child and actually looking after it? If the family friendly aspect of Sweden is childcare then I give you some quotes from my clients aged 14 - 35
"My Mother was always at work and I felt so alone" "No one was at home, I went to fritids after school" "I did not know my parents they were always at work" and a question I ask is "Who taught you to..." answer "I learnt that in dagis, school fritids" Look around you, relationships are not working here within families or between people, why, we learn to connect through our connections to primarily our Mothers then Fathers and greater family and this supports us and protects us so when we enter the world of school we have the tools to express ourselves and who we are becoming, notice the Swedish children, quiet, unable to express themselves and generally afraid of new food, experiences and people.
Dagis sustains the system not the family.
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jessl
post 20.Aug.2006, 12:08 PM
Post #19
Joined: 10.Aug.2006

Hi!

Well, so u prefer that them men should go to the pub and leave the women in the home like they do in the Uk and in Australia? Oh, yes that will make u bond better with your kids. But, hey if u want to be a slave in the home then U go ahead. Kids also need to bond with other kids that they do at dagis.

I was raised like that and I am very outspoken and I do respect other cultures, I mean I am living in Australia and I do my education in another country. U r the one who is ignorant. In Swden we learn to speak another language and lots of alnguages and if that is being narrow minded than I suggest that U would go and take a course and pehaps move back to your won country. U seem to hate Sweden so much.

An for youyr information Swedes travel alot around the world, get your facts right first.
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Nidoh
post 20.Aug.2006, 12:09 PM
Post #20
Joined: 10.Jan.2006

QUOTE (Parden Me)
Just a small question, I may be old fashioned but all the information here is about daycare etc etc what happened to having a child and actually looking after it? If the family friendly aspect of Sweden is childcare then I give you some quotes from my clients aged 14 - 35
"My Mother was always at work and I felt so alone" "No one was at home, I went to fritids after school" "I did not know my parents they were always at work" and a question I ask is "Who taught you to..." answer "I learnt that in dagis, school fritids" Look around you, relationships are not working here within families or between people, why, we learn to connect through our connections to primarily our Mothers then Fathers and greater family and this supports us and protects us so when we enter the world of school we have the tools to express ourselves and who we are becoming, notice the Swedish children, quiet, unable to express themselves and generally afraid of new food, experiences and people.
Dagis sustains the system not the family.



You can't put the kid in dagis till the are one anyway. As for dagis itself compared with english pre-school are actually very good. The 3 dagis my kids went to were all on my case constantly about getting involed. Maybe I got lukcy but we had a parents group and parents were very much encouraged to get involed with the "dagis" scene. This has kept up in primary and secoundy schools here.

English daycare on the other was not quite so good. They were hell bent on sticking to every health and safty rule, but saw themselves as a place where kids were dumped while parents worked. Don't get me wrong they did their job well, but they felt out of place suggesting anything to the parents.

Lets not forget i was paying UK daycare over 8000:- /month, lot less here smile.gif

I do think sweden does this better and the side effects are less harmfull than UK, or have others had bad experiences here in sweden with this sort of thing?
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jessl
post 20.Aug.2006, 12:10 PM
Post #21
Joined: 10.Aug.2006

QUOTE (Parden Me)
Just a small question, I may be old fashioned but all the information here is about daycare etc etc what happened to having a child and actually looking after it? If the family friendly aspect of Sweden is childcare then I give you some quotes from my clients aged 14 - 35
"My Mother was always at work and I felt so alone" "No one was at home, I went to fritids after school" "I did not know my parents they were always at work" and a question I ask is "Who taught you to..." answer "I learnt that in dagis, school fritids" Look around you, relationships are not working here within families or between people, why, we learn to connect through our connections to primarily our Mothers then Fathers and greater family and this supports us and protects us so when we enter the world of school we have the tools to express ourselves and who we are becoming, notice the Swedish children, quiet, unable to express themselves and generally afraid of new food, experiences and people.
Dagis sustains the system not the family.



Hi!

Well, so u prefer that them men should go to the pub and leave the women in the home like they do in the UK and in Australia? Oh, yes that will make u bond better with your kids. But, hey if u want to be a slave in the home then U go ahead. Kids also need to bond with other kids that they do at dagis.And other countries don not have partenity leave so explain to me how fathers in the Uk or other countries establich a bond wiht their children. And I don't agree with that children in other countrie should start school when they are only four! I would call that chiuld slavery, thay should have fun and not being deprived their childhood too early.

I was raised like that and I am very outspoken and I do respect other cultures, I mean I am living in Australia and I do my education in another country. U r the one who is ignorant. In Swden we learn to speak another language and lots of alnguages and if that is being narrow minded than I suggest that U would go and take a course and pehaps move back to your won country. U seem to hate Sweden so much.

An for your information Swedes travel alot around the world, get your facts right first.
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Parden Me
post 20.Aug.2006, 06:03 PM
Post #22
Joined: 9.Apr.2005

Wow nerves hit there eh? laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
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Parden Me
post 20.Aug.2006, 06:07 PM
Post #23
Joined: 9.Apr.2005

Just for the record I thought this was about families? I was pointing out that families live in a home with Mom, Dad etc not in dagis... but obviously that did not register!...
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*Torque*
post 20.Aug.2006, 06:09 PM
Post #24


Jessi, PLEASE could you write out "You?" I want to read your comments and insights, but I get the willies reading what you write for "you." Thank goodness you are the only person on this site to write "you" this way.

I swear it takes a fraction of a second longer to type out. I'd bribe you if I could! :wink:
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Puffin
post 21.Aug.2006, 07:22 AM
Post #25
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Parden Me)
Just a small question, I may be old fashioned but all the information here is about daycare etc etc what happened to having a child and actually looking after it? If the family friendly aspect of Sweden is childcare then I give you some quotes from my clients aged 14 - 35
"My Mother was always at work and I felt so alone" "No one was at home, I went to fritids after school" "I did not know my parents they were always at work" and a question I ask is "Who taught you to..." answer "I learnt that in dagis, school fritids" Look around you, relationships are not working here within families or between people, why, we learn to connect through our connections to primarily our Mothers then Fathers and greater family and this supports us and protects us so when we enter the world of school we have the tools to express ourselves and who we are becoming, notice the Swedish children, quiet, unable to express themselves and generally afraid of new food, experiences and people.
Dagis sustains the system not the family.



Wow - none of the observations that you make about Swedish children sound anything like any of the kids that I know!

Of course being at home is an option if one of the partners makes enough money for the family to survive financially but for most people on average incomes this is a tough proposition. Salaries for average jobs tend to be in the £13,000-£18,000 or $20,000-30,000) So it tends to be only the very rich or the unemployed who are at home parents full time - and even then they take a huge hit on their pension.

However Sweden is very family friendly for the at home parent as well - I was an at home mum for 4 years and found Sweden well equipped with parks and lakes and forest etc. If you are lucky you will find yourself in an active mammagrupp when you have your baby - mine met at least once a month for the first year and we had a joint first birthday party.

Swedes do not put their children in daycare at all until the age of 1-2. There was a wide variety of activities within reach:

öppnaföreskola - a parent and child group usually run in church halls or local authority accomodation

Baby sång - a parent and child group to sing songs and fika

Babysim - swimming and water play

However to join in the above activities you will need at least a smattering of Swedish.

So I found Sweden very family friendly as an at home mum - however once children get to be 3 or 4 it is more difficult as many parents have to work for financial reasons or they use their 3 hours per day nursery place some of the days in the week - although where I live the vast majority took up their statutory rights to work part time, and many staggered their working life so that one parent would start work early while the other started late and dropped the kids off at nursery.


Of course there is no country that is perfect - but I think that Sweden has worked out a reasonable compromise for bablancing home/work.You can in no way compare a Swedish daycare of those in the US/UK - it is not the same thing at all! Having been home to the UK recently it is shocking what passes for daycare there - many babies from 3 months, are placed in daycare for 50 hours a week, with unqualified staff on the minimum wage, in cramped accomodation where they hardly ever went out - at a cost of 8000-10000 kroner per month!
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Stewart
post 22.Aug.2006, 01:15 PM
Post #26
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 31.Jul.2006

Jessl - you are the one who should come back to your own country - as you seem to hate Australia, Australians and everyone else for that matter. Sweden is a wonderful country in almost every respect, but that does not mean it is perfect, or that people that come from other countries can see differences and perhaps imperfections in the system here.

Your comments here and elsewhere are the most bitter and twisted on this forum and that is saying something. People here make reasonable comments and questions and all you do is shout them down with vitriol and mistruths. People even agree with many of your comments and you shout them down again.

Yeah right... all men in Australia & UK go to the pub in the day while women slave at home over the kids/dishes etc... Give us all a break!

Your bitterness and silly comments are not welcome by most people here I am sure.
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jessl
post 30.Aug.2006, 04:35 AM
Post #27
Joined: 10.Aug.2006

Stewart Campbell!

It seems to me that only everybody on this webpage are allowed to say how bad Sweden is and that Swedes are not able to defend what your are saying about our country.

I also would like to think that one can have an opinion about other countries. I mean waht is wrong with liking your country? If you did not know, it is called democracy;to say what you think.

And it seems like your feelings really got stepped on when I mentioned your pub habits.

Well, if I seem to have offended somebody then I am very sorry. There are many good things about Australia, like+ their wildlife and beaches which are nice.

It gets really frustrating when you live in another culture and people do not seem to want to understand what one have to say all the time.

I general Many Aussies are open and talk a lot and I like that, and I aslo have to say that for the Brits.

You get mad whan somebody tells bad things aout your country, then I do so when you say bad things about Sweden.

I hope I have mad my point, and no, there would be no other place I rahter would be at when it comes to statring a family, because Sweden is very family friendy. And in the Swedish culture it is impotnat for men to bond wiht their children, in ohter countries father do not get the oppertunity to do so, beacuse they do not get so much paternity leave.
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Cool Carib
post 30.Aug.2006, 08:48 AM
Post #28
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 4.Sep.2005

there's a new law whereby if only one of the parents is working that is providing you can find a decent job- that parent may stay at home for 1.5 years at 80 % pay.however, try to bring as much as you can from the uk for you and baby- nice christmas maternity clothes, bras, baby pram, medicine. there is a dusty warehouse type baby store (not at dusty warehouse prices) in munkadel which sells pretty much the same stuff all over sweden- you can check the website and compare prices, what you will need to bring etc. www.babyproffsen.se
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Puffin
post 30.Aug.2006, 09:19 AM
Post #29
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Not a new law - but it is not quite 1.5 years at 80% salary - currently about a year at 80% of salary and then 3 months at 120kr/day and then many parents eek it out with annual leave/pappadagar etc.

I don't know why people would want to bring so much stuff with them - H&M/KappAhl/Lindex do nice maternity and baby clothes. I don't know what medicine you are talking about

I recommend that people look into buying heavy duty Swedish prams with large wheels and the sleeping bags that fit inside if you are planning to venture out during the winter months - McClaren buggy's are great in the summer but those tiny wheels are useless in snow
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007
post 30.Aug.2006, 09:31 AM
Post #30
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Puffin)
I don't know why people would want to bring so much stuff with them - H&M/KappAhl/Lindex do nice maternity and baby clothes. I don't know what medicine you are talking about

I recommend that people look into buying heavy duty Swedish prams with large wheels and the sleeping bags that fit inside if you are planning to venture out during the winter months - McClaren buggy's are great in the summer but those tiny wheels are useless in snow


i always find a few bits here, but the lion's share of baby and maternity clothes came from abroad. the selection for one is a good reason. i also need more "business clothes" when i was pregnant. that's virtually non existant here and if you can find it, paying 1500kr upwards for an article of clothing for a couple of months is steep.

the big tires are a must on a pram here, though the UK does offer a nice selection at better prices. personally i advocate the second hand market for this.

medicines? well, i bring/brought back children's cold medicine, teething gel, ear thermometer, etc. i recently saw a fantastic first aid kit that target sells (a friend brought it from the US)...it's complete, in a great container and...cheap like sin in comparison.
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