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Family friendly Sweden??

Cool Carib
post 30.Aug.2006, 10:03 AM
Post #31
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 4.Sep.2005

clothes of course is a matter of taste, if you are a fan of disposable clothes that every single soul is wearing in the style from 3-4 years ago H&M/KappAhl/Lindex will do just fine. however if that's not your usaul mode and you want quality and more upscale especially if you are coming here around christmas time as you'd probably be going out a lot, it will cost you a fortune as well as endless time searching.
there is a great heavy duty 3 in 1 3-wheel pram from chicco - great for the swedish country side retailing on sale here at 8500 kronor which i bought in the uk for about 5500.
also you may require a persciption for a lot of over the counter pharmacueticals , included to 007's list- if you are suffering from a burning stomach like many pregnant women and have a favourite anacid bring tons. i have to get friends to mail me a regular supply of milk of magnesia.
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Rachel F
post 30.Aug.2006, 10:17 AM
Post #32
Joined: 12.Oct.2005

Ickle,both my partner and I are also from the UK and moved here with children and subsequently spawned another one. Are you the one from Baldock...hmm, lovely new bypass by the way!

Sweden is a fantastic place for parents and children - the dagis system is something that could only be dreamt of by UK working mothers, of which I was one. It is a flexible system too so you can use it like a nursery school as opposed to childcare per se.

It can be a bit lonely when you first get here because there isn't really a chatting in the playground culture so do look for a few expats (from the www.mumsinsweden.com website) to team up with. Once you can get childcare sorted, do go and learn some basic Swedish - it just means that you will be able to have your children's friends over without worrying that you can't understand what they are saying.

I would second the advice about stocking up with basics - multipacks of pyjamas, long sleeved t shirts etc from Tescos because nothing like that really exists here. Don't even bother thinking about buying outer clothing or footwear back home because it won't be technical/ robust enough to deal with the winters here - and be prepared for a minor heart attack at the cost - but think of it as cost per wear as they'll be in them every day for several hours during the long winter months.

If you have a stroller/ Maclaren buggy it will last about 2 weeks in the snow and grit - you need a big old fashioned pram/ buggy that you can buy here more cheaply than the UK.

Oh yes, and be sure that you have the extended version of your children's birth certificate - the standard UK one only states the name, place and date of birth which is not good enough for the authorities here. You need the one that states the parents' names and occupations and if you don't have that, which I didn't for one of my children, you will need a letter of authority from a head teacher, doctor, solicitor etc to state that you and your partner are indeed the parents of said offspring. It's a right pain in the posterior because you can't breathe here without a personal number and as the children are grouped together on a parent's application it means that everyone is held up without the appropriate documentation.

Good luck with the move...
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Puffin
post 30.Aug.2006, 10:30 AM
Post #33
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

I see your point that if you have very sepcial clothes requirements that you might want to stock up in the UK - I didn't have that sort of money when I was pregnant and anyway where I live in Sweden there isn't a lot of dressing up - in fact I bought very little maternity wear and I wanted them to be disposable as I was certainly not going to wear maternity clothes for more than a few months! - there was not a lot of Christmas glamour either where I live either- most people stay home at Christmas and wear casual clothes - Mr Puffin's Christmas do (like many in Sweden)was employees only.

Obviously I had no knowledge of your situation and which exact model of pram you chose - I was just giving the imformation so that people would not make the same mistake as an English friend who bought her pram in the UK - with small wheels only to find that in the rural area where we lived you needed at least 10 inch wheels to cope with the many feet of snow. I found the one I wasted was cheaper than in the UK - but I guess it depends if you can find a special deal.

However I did buy my baby bedding in the UK.

I was very wary of taking over the counter medicines when pregnant - so i took my midwife's advice on what was safe to use - but I took a lot of antacids as well when I was pregnant and found that Swedish gaviscon while tasting more disgusting was a lot more effective than the UK one and I bought Milk of Magnesia over the counter at Apoteket which is called Link here - but stick to peppermint - I bought strawberry by acident and that was really disgusting. The kids like Calpol - but they also like the Strawberry Alvedon that you get here.
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Puffin
post 30.Aug.2006, 10:33 AM
Post #34
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Petronella_ponsonby)
Don't even bother thinking about buying outer clothing or footwear back home because it won't be technical/ robust enough to deal with the winters here - and be prepared for a minor heart attack at the cost - but think of it as cost per wear as they'll be in them every day for several hours during the long winter months.


LOL - I made the mistake of letting Mr Puffin take the kids shopping for winter boots last year - big mistake as they managed to talk him inte going to Ecco
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Alfredo
post 30.Aug.2006, 11:04 AM
Post #35
Joined: 1.Dec.2005

Kläder efter väder - I think good quality boots are worthwhile, and the same goes for an ''overall'' (snowsuit thing) ...

Be warned, though. You can never be too early to get your hands on this stuff in Sweden, because when it's sold, that's it!

That's your lot!

Until the following year!!!
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Rachel F
post 30.Aug.2006, 11:35 AM
Post #36
Joined: 12.Oct.2005

You're not wrong Alfredo - apparently we are already in Autumn and we're not even out of August!

I would agree with you on the quality thing - much better to buy second hand quality items, such as overalls, wet weather gear etc, than crappy new ones.
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Puffin
post 30.Aug.2006, 12:41 PM
Post #37
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

The best baby item I ever bought was an overall that could be zipped in 2 different directions - therefore you could have it with legs for the car seat or as a sleeping bag for the pram
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