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Racism Sweden

Aneud
post 23.Jan.2006, 07:30 PM
Post #31
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 27.Nov.2005

IMO Swedish is a tough language to learn but far from impossible. However it depends on how good you are with languages generally. It also depends on other factors such as how logical your mind is, how good your memory is, how much of exposure you get to the language and what sort of teaching tools you use.

Talk about stating the obvious... Lacka till! tongue.gif
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Sven Adultbooks
post 23.Jan.2006, 07:44 PM
Post #32
Joined: 23.Jan.2006

If anyone has any information on these cities or swedish courses I would be grateful for any info?

Also, Is Swedish hard to learn?

engal. biggrin.gif[/quote]

Look up Svenska För Invandrare (SFI). It is a free set of courses for immigrants. You will need a personnummer to apply. The courses are pretty much full time, mine was every day Monday to Friday 0900 to 1230. It´s full on and intensive especially if you get a good teacher.

The hardest thing for me is being able to practice. As soon as any Swede´s hear my English accent they automatically reply in English and then it´s very difficult to switch back to my broken Swedish. I suppose this makes life easier in terms of getting along and being able to buy or get services but you don´t feel part of the culture. I mean that from a personal point of view, I don´t mean that Swedes try to make you feel that way (however they do like to show off their English).

Ironically, my "sambo" is a Swedish and English teacher but we´ve taken the decision to speak English at home because we have a baby and we want him to be fluent in both languages. He´ll become fluent in Swedish anyway but it´s important to give him a head start in English and also means that I´ll hold my authority as a parent better with him. Imagine trying to keep him on the right track in dodgy Swedish, he´d walk all over me and not have much respect for me. We know of English couples who´ve tried to bring up their children while learning and practising their Swedish at home with terrible consequences for the kids.

Another difficult thing about the language is that the extra vowel sounds are totally alien to an englsih person. Your brain is constantly trying to fit the sounds into templates that it recognises and it´s therefore quite difficult to actually hear the subtleties of the vowel sounds. I listen to the radio as much as possible, even though I don´t necessarily understand the content my brain is processing the sounds and it will eventually be easier to discriminate between vowels and accents.

Good luck.
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*Brave New World*
post 23.Jan.2006, 07:59 PM
Post #33


Aaron_in_berlin

How can I be ungrateful to the country which gave my the shelter and probably saved me from death. Sweden is my new homeland although I have experienced the worst moments of my life here and I know that I will never be a part of this society.

I see this time as a school and learning are not always pleasant task so everything which happens has a meaning and it learns us something new about our existence.

I have always tried to make a difference between hard working Swedish people who pay their taxes and seldom complain and the politicians who manipulate the masses and take the right to form the society as they please although they lack the essential abilities.

The more young and educated persons we have, the less the politicians have a chance to manipulate masses.

Bless are those who love to learn and share with the others their knowledge.
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*Norge*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:06 PM
Post #34


thanks for the replies, theyve been very helpful :wink:

can anyone tell me their personal experiences with swedes, what are they like?
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FR
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:11 PM
Post #35
Joined: 22.Oct.2005

QUOTE (Brave New World)
...
How can I be ungrateful to the country which gave my the shelter and probably saved me from death. ...


Wow. Sounds like the stuff of an exciting book.
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*Norge*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:11 PM
Post #36


can anyone tell me how hard it would for me to get a job if i speak english french and swedish?

all replies welcome. smile.gif
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*The Teenage Diplomat*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:20 PM
Post #37


It would still be hard, there are several people here with a lot of university education that have been unemployed for years.
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*Norge*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:24 PM
Post #38


wat do employers look for in sweden?
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*The Teenage Diplomat*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:30 PM
Post #39


Usually someone who speak swedish almost fluently, who also knows english, and who has 3-5 years of experience within the area etc etc etc, the problem is that there is usually always someone who has more. It's not uncommon at all with people who have applied for hundreds of jobs and neven been to an interview. I know it sounds a bit sad, but unfortunately that's as real as it gets. But this is general, it might be different depending on what you wanna work with.
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etuna
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:43 PM
Post #40
Joined: 21.Jan.2006

Sven Adultbooks, you wouldnt happen to be from Newcastle by any chance...?
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*Norge*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:48 PM
Post #41


do you know how easy it is to get into the police or teaching?

or to start your own business?
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*The Teenage Diplomat*
post 23.Jan.2006, 08:50 PM
Post #42


Well, teachers is one thing that Sweden lack depending on what you're gonna teach. They also expect there to be a lack of teachers in the future, but usually they want a degree within those subjects.
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Alice Is Back
post 23.Jan.2006, 09:12 PM
Post #43
Joined: 15.Jan.2006

QUOTE (Brave New World)
Aaron_in_berlin

How can I be ungrateful to the country which gave my the shelter and probably saved me from death. Sweden is my new homeland although I have experienced the worst moments of my life here and I know that I will never be a part of this society.


I am sorry to hear about this I am a foreigner too and I know I will never be a German but I really do not worry about it. I mean what is most important is who you are and not where you come from. What so you mean by I will never be a part of this society exactly? What are you expecting?
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*Livvy*
post 23.Jan.2006, 10:09 PM
Post #44


QUOTE (Engal)
do you know how easy it is to get into the police or teaching?

or to start your own business?


To get into the Swedish Police, you need to be a Swedish citizen.
To work as a teacher, you need to be a qualified teacher.
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*Brave New World*
post 23.Jan.2006, 10:18 PM
Post #45


Aaron_in_berlin

This topic is so huge that we would need hours to discuss it and at the and I know that I would be called a madmen by some of Swedes who never want to hear the truth. There is an old book from 1975 which had explained to me things which I felt my in heart and I would like to recommend to you , if you really want to know why and how Sweden has become such a cold soulless country.
It was an English journalist who lived here for a few years who wrote the book and the title is
"The New Totalitarians "
I have lived in Germany too. I was a refugee already 1984, and know that Germany is a still country where culture and our European heritage have an important role. Germans like people who want to work and give them the chance, but here in Sweden you can try as much as you can but the walls are thicker and higher then the Berlin wall. When I was in Germany I could see people from the whole Europe working as builders, here are constructor companies almost ethnic cleansed.Not to mention all those well educated men and women who sit home and will never get a chance to show what they can. It is a human tragedy which happens every day in this country and for which is somebody responsible for.

When the first immigrant got a post as a school minister, Ibrahim Bailan, the reporter on Swedish TV said that he came from a village where there was no electricity nor running water. What is this saying to you? He should be grateful that he came here at all and for the first time can experience civilisation.

If you look at Swedish schools you see that Swedes and immigrants have so little contact to each other. There are two worlds which exist and which will clash with each other the day when the money begins to disappear, for money is almost only strength which keep this society together.
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