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How much do you need to retire

in sweden

rorre
post 16.Jan.2018, 10:59 PM
Post #1
Joined: 6.Jul.2012

Hi,
would you retire and never have to do a normal job again without any second thoughts, if you have 10 million swedish sek, or would 20 million sek enough (after tax) to have a very comforting family life with decent life style?
In your honest opinion, At what amount, would you consider quitting your job in sweden, and never having to do the routine job from 8 to 5 and do something fun, social service, etc
are there any statistics of number of millionaires in sweden , like the one below for billionaires, http://www.wikiwand.com/en/List_of_Swedes_by_net_worth
Any opinions are welcome! smile.gif
Thanks in advance.
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Savage
post 17.Jan.2018, 12:13 AM
Post #2
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

Just want to point out, that many of the millionaires in the list don't live in Sweden. With many like the Tetrapak heirs living abroad, because of the cost of living in Sweden being too high
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Bsmith
post 17.Jan.2018, 12:27 AM
Post #3
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Be enough for me. Please PM me for the details of who to make the check out to.
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Gjeebes
post 17.Jan.2018, 06:59 AM
Post #4
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

"millionaires in sweden"

Are you talking SEK? 1 million SEK is essentially just 100,000 units in any other currency worthy of comparison.

You need at least 10 million SEK, to be a "real" millionaire.
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Essingen55
post 17.Jan.2018, 09:49 AM
Post #5
Joined: 12.Dec.2013

Most people could manage comfortably on the current break-even point for 50% tax in Sweden...around SEK 450,000. This would give you about SEK 30,000 a month in income...about SEK 1,000 a day for everything. Given that the average life length is around 88 years, deduct the age you want to retire from 88 and multiply by 450,000.

e.g. Retire at 65 means needing 88-65 = 23 x 450,000 = SEK 10,350,000
Retire at 40 means needing 88-40 = 48 x 450,000 = SEK 21,600,000

These are the amounts of GROSS income. This is the bad news...now the even worse news is that you can easily see how much you have to date by looking in your orange pension envelope at the amount of your pot so far. You can deduct this amount and that is the amount of gross income left to find.
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Bsmith
post 17.Jan.2018, 11:28 AM
Post #6
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Face it, we're going to be working until our 70's.
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rorre
post 17.Jan.2018, 08:08 PM
Post #7
Joined: 6.Jul.2012

Thank you guys for the replies.
@ Savage Ok so they stay out of sweden to avoid high taxes and high cost of living. do they have dual citizenships?
@ Gjeebes Yes, i was talking about 1 million SEK
@ BSmith lol..I am pretty sure mate, I aint going to work after 50s, that would be max.

@Essingen55 That is exactly the Calculation or figures i am looking for.

As a swedish citizen,what would be the smart move like few of the billionairs above,for a person who is going to get, say 30 million sek(from assets) and needs to pay 50 percent tax once it gets into the swedish bank account? would you pay the tax and stay in sweden(no special love or obligations to stay in sweden) or would you consider move to different country(which one?), to avoid the 50 percent cut.

Cheers!
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Bsmith
post 18.Jan.2018, 02:38 AM
Post #8
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

If you can retire in your 50's good for you. I retired after 35 years of teaching at age 57 1/2 but after a year off I was a bit bored so I went back to work. Only 3 days a week, though. Not too bad.
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Cheeseroller
post 18.Jan.2018, 07:39 AM
Post #9
Location: Germany
Joined: 10.Apr.2007

The calculations above do not consider inflation over 88 years :-)
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Gjeebes
post 18.Jan.2018, 07:44 AM
Post #10
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

Find the way to take "your" money, and run.

Do you really think "your" 15 million sek, the Nanny-state will claim, will be put to good use?

If so, pay it. If not, run for it!
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Essingen55
post 18.Jan.2018, 09:19 AM
Post #11
Joined: 12.Dec.2013

QUOTE
The calculations above do not consider inflation over 88 years :-)


Assuming that you have the amounts stated at the ages stated, you should be able to invest the amounts in equities to deal with the inflation issue.
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rorre
post 18.Jan.2018, 09:15 PM
Post #12
Joined: 6.Jul.2012

@ Bsmith Teaching since 22 yrs old of age and for 35 years Damn!! sure you liked your job and good at it. Not too many professions might leave as much vacuum after retiring such as teaching.
3 days a week work sounds perfect:) Perhaps that would be the future working hours in sweden after a decade, 5 hour work days or 3 day work week.
I get your point. I want to quit the normal 8-5 office job but still do some other work i enjoy more and is satisfying.

@ Gjeebes I am trying to find out that way. Havent figured it out yet.
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Bsmith
post 1.Jul.2018, 07:55 PM
Post #13
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

QUOTE (rorre @ 18.Jan.2018, 08:15 PM) *
@ Bsmith Teaching since 22 yrs old of age and for 35 years Damn!! sure you liked your job and good at it. Not too many professions might leave as much vacuum after ... (show full quote)


I don't know your age but I cannot recommend strongly enough to save, save, save. Also, take advantage of any program your company offers that matches funds, or offers discounted stock, etc. If I had half the money I blew when I was young and had invested it...I would be a rich, rich man.


Did have fun though...
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john.boy
post 1.Jul.2018, 09:08 PM
Post #14
Location: Stockholm county
Joined: 27.Sep.2017

Remember that pensions are taxable income. The best option right now, if you are a high income earner, is to aim to keep the final monthly pension below the State income tax level, place other monies into regular savings to build up funds there, if you place funds above the tax deduction level (reduced by the government) then remember it is taxed twice, once at payroll time and again when paid as pension. This is why it is better right now to just place into regular savings.

Better still, at pension age move to Portugal so you don't get taxed as heavily on your Swedish sourced pension rolleyes.gif
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Bsmith
post 2.Jul.2018, 11:39 AM
Post #15
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

The problem is that no one knows what the future holds and how the rules might change in the intervening time. Better to have too much money than not enough.
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