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Gaining Citizenship in Sweden...

Have no permit to stay, is this a problem?

bravedave
post 24.Feb.2010, 01:51 AM
Post #1
Joined: 12.May.2008

Hello,

Its getting near that time where I have been here 5 years. Moved here in late 2005 from the UK. I am a UK citizen
working and living here in Sweden. I have held a job here since I moved and had a permit to stay when I moved.
The permit to stay was for 2 years and has long expired.

Will this effect my application for citizenship, how does one apply for citizenship? Its dual nationality im looking for.
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Furu
post 24.Feb.2010, 03:17 AM
Post #2
Joined: 16.Jan.2008

For more information http://www.migrationsverket.se/info/medborgare_en.html
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Rick Methven
post 24.Feb.2010, 09:30 AM
Post #3
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE (bravedave @ 24.Feb.2010, 01:51 AM) *
Hello,Its getting near that time where I have been here 5 years. Moved here in late 2005 from the UK. I am a UK citizenworking and living here in Sweden. I have held a job her ... (show full quote)

Your permit to stay stamp is most probably the same as the one I got which is also expired. It says "Utan tidesbegränsning" so it does not matter and has no affect on your status

As to Dual nationality, Britain does not officially accept dual nationality for anybody over the age of 16. If you take up Swedish Nationality, the Swedish authorities will inform the UK authorities that you are now Swedish citizen and the UK authorties will take away your UK citizenship.

I know a British guy who took out US citizenship but held on to his British passport which he used to try and enter the UK at heathrow to avoid the non-EU que. His UK passport was flagged as not valid and confiscated.
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byke
post 24.Feb.2010, 09:38 AM
Post #4
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 24.Feb.2010, 09:30 AM) *
As to Dual nationality, Britain does not officially accept dual nationality for anybody over the age of 16. If you take up Swedish Nationality, the Swedish authorities will in ... (show full quote)

Are you sure on this rick?
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Etheric
post 24.Feb.2010, 09:44 AM
Post #5
Joined: 2.Jul.2009

http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishci...ualnationality/

QUOTE
If you become a national of another country

You will not normally lose your British nationality if you become a citizen or national of another country. If you are a British subject otherwise than by connection with the Republic of Ireland you will lose that status on acquiring any other nationality or citizenship. If you are a British protected person you will lose that status on acquiring any other nationality or citizenship.

If you are becoming a citizen or national of a country that does not allow dual nationality, you may be required by that country to give up your British nationality.

The UK is pretty liberal about dual nationality. The US on the other hand is not. You have to give up your other citezenship if you want a US passport.

Do you know how the Swedes think about it? I am a bit tempted to get a swedish passport if I dont have to give up my UK one.
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Etheric
post 24.Feb.2010, 09:46 AM
Post #6
Joined: 2.Jul.2009

Well according to wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_nationality_law

QUOTE
The changes to the law also mean that foreigners seeking naturalisation as a Swedish citizen do not need to renounce their former citizenship. They may retain it if the law of the other country permits them to do so.


I guess I will get a dual passport at some point then biggrin.gif. Will be cool. Assuming wikipedia is right, I guess it is biggrin.gif.
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Mackan2017
post 24.Feb.2010, 09:54 AM
Post #7
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 22.Feb.2010

Absolutely pointless thing to do. We're all EU citizens which, with every little law change in Brussels, means that the difference between having a UK or Swedish passport is virtually Zero.
Sure, it might entitle you to do army service in the event of a call-up, or vote in one election or another, but essentially there's next-to no distinction. And, as I've said above, whatever distinctions remain are becoming less and less by the month.

Total waste of time and effort.
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byke
post 24.Feb.2010, 09:59 AM
Post #8
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

I have always believed I was a dual national, but I did start to question whether I had made a mistake or misunderstood the rules LOL.

But since I have a british passport, have had all my kids recognized and birth certificates and passports for them from the UK embassy(even though they were born to a swedish mother in sweden) they also have swedish birth certificates and passports ... and I was even called for national service in sweden many moons ago.

So maybe it is possible to be a dual national?
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byke
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:02 AM
Post #9
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

QUOTE (Mackan2017 @ 24.Feb.2010, 09:54 AM) *
Absolutely pointless thing to do. We're all EU citizens which, with every little law change in Brussels, means that the difference between having a UK or Swedish passport is virtually Zero.

I dont know, when traveling through europe on the train at times and being stopped by passport control or customs, I find its allot easier to flash a british passport without getting issues. (dont ask me why though, as I haven't got a clue)
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gplusa
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:07 AM
Post #10
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

Agree that 2 EU passports are not of great benefit within Europe. But it's sometimes helpful to have a "friendly country" passport when travelling outside of Europe. Just to smooth the ride. I've flown in and out of New Zealand and Australia a lot. And I've seen that the majority of travellers (apart from the Asian countries) spending time being grilled by Customs are travelling on either UK or US passports. Some days it helps that the world trusts Swedes more.
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byke
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:08 AM
Post #11
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Just out of interest,
Are there any British males on here married to a Swedish woman, who's wife has applied for British Citizenship?

Is there any advantages for such?
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Etheric
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:19 AM
Post #12
Joined: 2.Jul.2009

You need to have lived legally in the UK for three years to be eligable, so unless the couple lived in the UK it is not possible.
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Rick Methven
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:29 AM
Post #13
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE (byke @ 24.Feb.2010, 09:38 AM) *
Are you sure on this rick?

It seems from the other posts that it was not the British law but Britain enforcing the law of other counties - ie USA that was the problem with my British/US friend.

QUOTE (byke @ 24.Feb.2010, 10:08 AM) *
Just out of interest,. Are there any British males on here married to a Swedish woman, who's wife has applied for British Citizenship?. Is there any advantages for such?

When we lived in the UK we did look into my wife taking out British citizenship but where told by the UK Nationalisation people then (1980's) that She would have to give up her Swedish citizenship so she never did it. It was not made clear to us that it was the Swedes who set the dual nationality rules. Just a letter that said she would have to renounce her Swedish citizenship if she wanted to become a British National.

My first wife renounced her Romanian citizenship when she got British citizenship. But the then Romanian law said that if you where born a Romanian the Communist government retained the right to treat you as a Romanian for life
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Craptastical
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:33 AM
Post #14
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 21.Feb.2007

QUOTE (Etheric @ 24.Feb.2010, 09:44 AM) *
http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishci...ualnationality/The UK is pretty liberal about dual nationality. The US on the other hand is not. You have to give up your other ci ... (show full quote)

Not true about the US. Please read this: http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_...s/cis_1753.html

The most important bit in that is this: "In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship."

The key phrase is "with the intention to give up". There are ways that one can be stripped of US citizenship, they're linked from that page, but as a general rule US citizens are allowed dual citizenship.
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Puffin
post 24.Feb.2010, 10:35 AM
Post #15
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Prior to the 2001 Nationality Act Swedes could not hold dual nationality

It is still a problem for some nationalities - for example Denmark does not recognise dual nationality.
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