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Maximum working hour in Sweden?

having more than one job

stststst
post 24.Jan.2015, 12:28 PM
Post #1
Joined: 20.May.2013

Does anyone know whether there is any maximum working hours limit imposed on the employee side with one full-time and several part-time jobs?

Any information about this will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
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*Guest*
post 24.Jan.2015, 12:41 PM
Post #2


QUOTE (stststst @ 24.Jan.2015, 12:28 PM) *
Does anyone know whether there is any maximum working hours limit imposed on the employee side with one full-time and several part-time jobs?Any information about this will be ... (show full quote)


I am a bit confused, do you mean is there a maximum amount of hours you are legally allowed to work as imposed by a union on your employer or do you mean if you have 3 jobs and work 90 hours at each will you get in trouble from a government agency for "working to much"?

I have never heard anything to say that there is a maximum you can choose to work freely. I personally have put in a 274 hour month quite a few years ago during a new start-up and was never penalized for it as such beyond being a bit burnt out.

But, if you meant the other thing, than yes, I believe many unions have strict guidelines on the amount of hours over full-time that employees can be forced to work. Whether or not this is actually enforced can be debated.
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yet another brit
post 24.Jan.2015, 06:06 PM
Post #3
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

For any given employee/employer, the basic rule is 48 hours per four week period or 50 hours per calendar month. An additional 150 hours per year also possible. Can be modified by a collective bargaining agreement. Also overtime limits can be exceeded in emergency situations ("sorry, I have to stop chopping you out of the burning wreck of your car, as I'm about to go over my overtime limits for the month, and what would the union say...".)

As far as I know this would apply to each of your employments - it isn't cumulative, it is about whether employer A "exploits" worker B.

Some (including me in a former life) individually contract to simply work the hours needed and not record any times. You get, say, an extra weeks holiday in return. I assure you that my employer got the better of the deal...
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lostinSE
post 24.Jan.2015, 06:48 PM
Post #4
Joined: 2.Apr.2012

i think it`s 8hr+4hr so 12hr. one full time + one part time. not sure if it applies to sweden

In sweden I think that there is a mandatory 11 consecutive hours of rest per 24h with the exception of : national defence,security,plant or machinery repairs,work that is essential for the life of the community.

It would make sense to be like this in Sweden but im not sure.

I guess you can become a threat for the community if you for example work 16 hours a day,sleep 5 hours and the other 3 you eat and drive.
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LLHope
post 25.Jan.2015, 01:19 AM
Post #5
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 1.Jan.2014

QUOTE (stststst @ 24.Jan.2015, 12:28 PM) *
Does anyone know whether there is any maximum working hours limit imposed on the employee side with one full-time and several part-time jobs? Any information about this will b ... (show full quote)

Yes there is, it is based upon the EU Directive for Working hours. Check that for the specifics. Also note that certain parts can be overruled by Collective Agreements between employers and Trade Unions. If there is a collective agreement you need to check that.
(also read further down about employer-employee basis )
QUOTE (yet another brit @ 24.Jan.2015, 06:06 PM) *
An additional 150 hours per year also possible. Can be modified by a collective bargaining agreement.

Almost correct wink.gif The basic law is 200 hours, but some Unions have in their collective agreements reduced it to 150 per year.
QUOTE (lostinSE @ 24.Jan.2015, 06:48 PM) *
I think that there is a mandatory 11 consecutive hours of rest per 24h with the exception of

The Swedish law is based upon the EU Directive for Working hours, whilst the EU Treaties did not allow direct interference with Member State working hours, the EU Commission and Parliament sneaked it through as a Health and Safety Directive which they did have the right to implement across the EU biggrin.gif

There is a GIANT FLAW in the Directive (and hence also in Swedish law) which makes a mockery of the fact it was supposed to be with regard for health and safety. It only applies to a single employer-employee relationship, not an individual's total working hours. So, if you have 2 or more jobs with different employers then the rules apply seperately to each employer-employee relationship. This means that you are allowed say 200 hours overtime per year per employer, if you have 2 jobs then 400 hours (200 each). But it must be different employers biggrin.gif This also means for example, whilst you must have 11 hours between work with a single employer, you can do your other job during that time and vice-versa.

Basically, according to law, you can work as much as you want, but only as much as the law allows per job with that employer.
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TLSucks
post 25.Jan.2015, 02:44 AM
Post #6
Joined: 12.Dec.2013

QUOTE (LLHope @ 25.Jan.2015, 01:19 AM) *
There is a GIANT FLAW in the Directive (and hence also in Swedish law) which makes a mockery of the fact it was supposed to be with regard for health and safety. It only appli ... (show full quote)


I don't think it is a flaw really. The law is to protect workers from being overworked by their employers, but it is impossible to regulate how many jobs you are allowed to take on, and one employer cannot be expected to keep track of other potential employers' schedules.
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bobthedog
post 27.Jan.2015, 01:50 PM
Post #7
Joined: 6.Jan.2008

Watch out for the tax position when you have multiple employers; if you are on PAYE you will be taxed once for each job at not at the marginal rate for total earnings. The tax man will come knocking at declaration time for his money. May not matter if your are not earning much, but it can hurt quite quickly.
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yet another brit
post 27.Jan.2015, 07:23 PM
Post #8
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

QUOTE (bobthedog @ 27.Jan.2015, 01:50 PM) *
Watch out for the tax position when you have multiple employers; if you are on PAYE you will be taxed once for each job at not at the marginal rate for total earnings. The tax ... (show full quote)


Which you can get round by asking any employer to set your PAYE rate higher. My wife does this, as a way of forcing herself to save, then she always gets a lump sum at the end of the year. Which I can then go and spend on beer. Job done!
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Hisingen
post 28.Jan.2015, 11:36 AM
Post #9
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

With two or three totally different employers you can literally work till you drop. If that gives you satisfaction - - - -
sad.gif
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LLHope
post 28.Jan.2015, 12:36 PM
Post #10
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 1.Jan.2014

QUOTE (Hisingen @ 28.Jan.2015, 11:36 AM) *
With two or three totally different employers you can literally work till you drop. If that gives you satisfaction - - - - sad.gif
Exactly!
QUOTE (TLSucks @ 25.Jan.2015, 02:44 AM) *
I don't think it is a flaw really. The law is to protect workers from being overworked by their employers, but it is impossible to regulate how many jobs you are allowed to take on
See above!

It was passed as a health and safety measure that is flawed. It was recognised at the time it was flawed. There is currently a review on-going about the Working Hours directive, where a couple of items are of specific concern, namely, 1. Concurrent Contracts, 2. The opt out from the 48hr maximum working week (which UK did take advantage of).

Current legislation dictates that employers are obliged to keep a record of working hours per employee, and must produce those upon request by competent authority. If however those were submitted on a regular basis to a central body, then it would become more transparent. This would take into account concurrent contracts, even from the same "employer" who happens to have more than 1 company wink.gif

However, as with everything there is a way around even that. Even today to bypass the working hours rules it is common for management and other certain professionals to have contracts where they are not paid for overtime, so each week is exactly 40 hours. They are expected to do overtime as required by their job, and in contract are given 1 weeks extra vacation instead.

Or, what I came across in other countries, specifically those with low cost manufacturing plants in Europe. Even though the plant runs 24x7, workers only even do regular shifts and maximum allowed overtime per month/year. The additional overtime is not recorded, instead it is off-record agreed with the workforce that they work additional hours and then compensated with a bonus that just happens to match the pay they would have got for paid overtime!

Where there's a will there's a way!
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TLSucks
post 29.Jan.2015, 12:39 AM
Post #11
Joined: 12.Dec.2013

QUOTE (LLHope @ 28.Jan.2015, 12:36 PM) *
Exactly! See above!It was passed as a health and safety measure that is flawed. It was recognised at the time it was flawed. There is currently a review on-going abou ... (show full quote)


Sure, from a theoretical point of view it is certainly possible. But it will never ever happen in reality.
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