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Growing vegetables in Sweden

Looking for online resources

corduroykid
post 4.Mar.2012, 06:08 PM
Post #1
Location: Uppsala
Joined: 5.Jul.2011

Hi all!

I would like to start growing my own veggies but I'm a complete beginner. We have a good sized patio where we can grow things in containers and intend to buy a mini greenhouse too.

There is of course a lot of information online in English, but I'm really looking for information specific to Sweden as I don't know when to start planting or anything like that. Can anyone recommend any good online resources? My Swedish is very average so I'm having some trouble locating this myself and figured there are bound to be some Localers out there who already know the best websites.

Thanks in advance!
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Streja
post 4.Mar.2012, 06:22 PM
Post #2
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

http://www.odla.nu/artiklar/ute/gronsaker/...es-odlingszoner
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ChocOwl
post 4.Mar.2012, 06:57 PM
Post #3
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

www.alternativ.nu
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Baned
post 4.Mar.2012, 11:43 PM
Post #4
Joined: 22.Feb.2009

http://www.impecta.se/
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ChocOwl
post 4.Mar.2012, 11:57 PM
Post #5
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

http://kolonitradgardsforbundet.se/om_forb...blikationer.php
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corduroykid
post 5.Mar.2012, 12:15 AM
Post #6
Location: Uppsala
Joined: 5.Jul.2011

Thanks guys, these are great! I had managed to find that map in odla.nu and know what region I am in, but I don't actually know what to do with that information! I assumed there might be some kind of calendar for each region, detailing which herbs and vegetables to plant at which time of year, but I can't seem to find one. Anyone know if such a thing exists?
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David S
post 5.Mar.2012, 12:20 AM
Post #7
Location: Gävle
Joined: 12.Oct.2005

+1 on the thanks. Now that we have a house and plenty of land we're getting in to the growing things arena as well. I'm clueless!

corduroykid - one thing I have learned is that the seed packets have info on how to plant and when. I also bought a magazine at the cashier at K-rauta for 10kr, also seen it at Plantagen, that has schedules and info as well as lists of probably thousands of seeds. My sambo has it somewhere at the moment, can't remember the name sorry!

Good luck!
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corduroykid
post 5.Mar.2012, 01:20 PM
Post #8
Location: Uppsala
Joined: 5.Jul.2011

Thanks David, need to get myself to a gardening centre then and check it out. This whole thing is like a minefield, I've wanted to do this for years but didn't really appreciate how complicated it was going to be!
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Fishtank
post 5.Mar.2012, 01:30 PM
Post #9
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

I have no idea how to start... But if I were you, I will go to nearest plantagen.se and have a word with nice staff over there.. they can give you suggestions... They can even help you buying a beginners kit if such things exist..

May be while going there take some soil from your patio so they also know if it is ok to start with what you have or need to buy something more. Sorry if I sound like a bit off wink.gif


Good luck developing Green thumb.
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corduroykid
post 5.Mar.2012, 01:38 PM
Post #10
Location: Uppsala
Joined: 5.Jul.2011

Actually we only have a patio so no soil there as yet! The plan is to buy pots for growing cherry tomatoes, garlic, herbs, that kind of thing. There seems to be so much info in English on how to do this, I bought my sister-in-law a great book last year that had a great calendar for when everything should be done, but it will obviously be different here. I really need an idiot's guide for this... as with most things...
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BritVik
post 5.Mar.2012, 03:20 PM
Post #11
Joined: 22.Oct.2011

With a mini-greenhouse, providing it isn't too mini, you can plant tomatoes in sacks i.e. lay the sack of soil down. make a couple or three holes in the side and put your tomato plants into them. You will need to water them of course, but it does work. We have done it many times, albeit in a larger greenhouse. Seeds tend to be somewhat more expensive here, unfortunately. Runner beans for example - if you like them - are often limited to about ten in an envelope and are treated as 'flowering beans' blomsterbönor' and only mention that the beans are edible at the end of the description.
Pallet frames are another method, filled with earth they provide the makings of a raised bed and as such you can plant in them even before the garden soil is warm enough as long as you provide a covering.
I have an old Reader's Digest gardening book aimed at the UK with the seasonal guidance, to which you need to add a couple of months for starters. To balance that we have a similar book for Sweden, and thereby get the best of both worlds.
There are no doubt plenty of more up-to-date books available, but the basic principals have not changed, only what chemicals/fertilizers etc. you can and cannot use here.

Go - green fingers - go smile.gif
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Johno
post 5.Mar.2012, 03:40 PM
Post #12
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

On the topic of gardening though not vegetables. How to get a patch of grass to look nice. In the UK there are multiple choices of lawn weed-and-feed compounds. In Sweden there only seems to be some expensive Bayer stuff (Stroller) to buy. Does everyone pull their dandylions (maskrosor) out by hand ? By the way the use of pretty strong acetic acid solution as weedkiller is an interesting Swedish concept.
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skogsbo
post 5.Mar.2012, 03:57 PM
Post #13
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

if you are on a budget, ikea bags filled with soil and few drainage holes are great for potatoes or tomatoes, but they take space. Some stuff grows quick and easily, so if you are short of space, but get decent sunlight, salad crops are the way to go. You could get 3 crops easily in a summer, compared to say 1 lot of potatoes, especially when spuds are cheap anyway.

If you combine this thinking with growing something low between something that grows up like tomatoes, or even cucumber, you can increase your yield. But you will need a plan for watering if you go away mid summer for very long. Even when you're finished with the tomatoes, I open the whole bag or container up, cut off the old tomato plant, then plant rockets seeds in it, there is normally enough life left in the soil to get a crop, provided it's not too cold. Once done, just compost the whole lot.

I have known people cut the middle out of the smaller rectangular bails of straw, fill it will some soil and grown tomatoes etc.. Quite good at holding the water and no plastic or wood containers involved at all. At the end, you can compost the lot. smile.gif

Dandelions, unless you get the whole root, they'll grow back up, they can sprout off even a few cms of root left over on some damp soil. One of natures survivers. However, their leaves are edible in a salad, you can batter and deep fry the flower heads if picked just at the point of first opening and you can make allsorts of drinks with juice from their stems. Their nectar is an excellent early season source for bees, some claim it makes the best honey (i'm not convinced). So for a weed they are quite good really.
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Johno
post 5.Mar.2012, 04:02 PM
Post #14
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Funny, same as the Swedish advice for dealing with ground elder (kirskål). Eat it. Thats the "green" solution, but thankfully you can buy buckets of Roundup anywhere. So back to dandylions ... ?
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BritVik
post 5.Mar.2012, 04:05 PM
Post #15
Joined: 22.Oct.2011

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 5.Mar.2012, 03:57 PM) *
Dandelions, unless you get the whole root, they'll grow back up, they can sprout off even a few cms of root left over on some damp soil. One of natures survivors. However, ... (show full quote)

If you have got some burdock then its D and B. Other than that - if the dandelions are prevalent - as in my garden - what about a good recipe for dandelion wine? Once upon a time an illegal beverage here, although you could get the recipe - one of the Swedish quirks - I have quite a good recipe - if required. It makes a pretty potent brew. Up to 15% wink.gif
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