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Are You Capable of Learning Much?

This is a Test, so Don't Jump Ouf of Any Window

*Trowbridge H. Ford*
post 6.Mar.2012, 08:13 PM
Post #1


All my 82 years, I have heard much about the importance of learning things - not just acquiring knowledge, but learning to do things better because of the experience of others.

I must say that I have been a very slow learner, as I expect most people have been - e.g, learning how to better stack dishes in the dish washer so they clean and dry better, how to fix applicances without calling a repair man or ordering a new one, how to better spend your money so you have a better quality of life, how to better protect yourself against losses of one sort or another, how to make the most of the time you have, given your resources, how to best keep your mind and body fit, etc.

Are you willing to follow the example of others in any of these matter?

I suspect that you, like me, are quite a slow learner.
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entry
post 7.Mar.2012, 03:08 AM
Post #2
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 1.Jul.2007

QUOTE (Trowbridge H. Ford @ 6.Mar.2012, 08:13 PM) *
how to make the most of the time

Almost 30 years ago my boss signed both of us up for a weekend time management course.

I was LATE...
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Jamtjim
post 7.Mar.2012, 06:35 AM
Post #3
Joined: 11.Sep.2006

Ah, but then no one would have expected you to be good at time management before you took the course. I bet you weren't late leaving at the end, which shows you learned something...
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John.Smith
post 7.Mar.2012, 08:10 AM
Post #4
Location: Sweden
Joined: 12.Sep.2011

The ability to learn new things demands that one has an open mind. The problem with having an open mind is that other people have a tendency to fill it up for you.

I am great at learning new things on a professional (work) level but terrible when it comes to my private life.
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Rick Methven
post 7.Mar.2012, 08:19 AM
Post #5
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

I suspect that most people can be quick to learn things that they are attracted to or stimulated by, but slow to learn things that they are not interested in.

Stimulated by my father, I have always been interested in technology and mechanics and so have been quick to learn things like car maintenance.

My son is a great musician but the only technical thing he wants to know about a car is where to put the fuel in
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SimonDMontfort
post 7.Mar.2012, 08:50 AM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm county
Joined: 8.Feb.2011

I think that 'learning' is very much a lifelong activity, and the more one learns, the more there seems to be to learn.

On the other hand 'ignorance is bliss' rolleyes.gif
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*Trowbridge H. Ford*
post 7.Mar.2012, 09:29 AM
Post #7


Thanks for your replies, as they have helped me define better what I am looking for - what isn't easy.

I am thinking about the adage that experience really proves what right. But to determine what experience can do, one cannot talk about being influenced by one's father or others do or recommend while one is growing up, ignorance is bliss, having a filled mind, doing what the boss demands, etc.

I was thinking if you ever voluntarily change your ideas or behavior because of experience which should at least make you review what you are doing, if not changing it.

The kinds of things I have in mind are most routine ones.

Actually, I was realling doing one, washing up after a wonderful steak dinner last night. I do so after every dinner, and my way to doing it is quite different from how my girl friend does. I stack up all the pots, pans, and utensils as best I can so that they will dry over night while she just puts them on the stainless steel counter any which way, and when she goes to put mine away the next morning, she apparently doesn't notice the difference in which way works best as she doesn't change her way, and I haven't changed mine.

And there are all kinds of other examples to illustrate what I am trying to get at.

Seems experience, when we have our minds made up, results in too little change.
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Rick Methven
post 7.Mar.2012, 09:48 AM
Post #8
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

I think there are two kinds of changes in behaviour.

Your washing up example relates to a domestic behaviour you have learned to do or not do based on efficiency. After dinner, my wife and I each carry out our own dishes and put them in the dishwasher. whoever cooked the meal takes care of the pots and pans. I leave my wine glass on the draining board and the wife washes both hers and mine up as I have a history of breaking expensive Kosta/Boda crystal sad.gif

There are other changes in attitude/behaviour based on other life experience which in life terms are more important
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Streja
post 7.Mar.2012, 10:42 AM
Post #9
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

You learn as long as you have students.
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Fishtank
post 7.Mar.2012, 11:17 AM
Post #10
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

We learn through realization .. not just by knowing something.

Simon, I agree with you. Ignorance is a bliss. smile.gif

I am slow learner specially with languages but quick with maths. But overall I am slow.

Cause might be being a deep water fish.
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Jamtjim
post 7.Mar.2012, 11:26 AM
Post #11
Joined: 11.Sep.2006

I tend to learn quickly if the thing I have just done has hurt...
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skogsbo
post 7.Mar.2012, 11:32 AM
Post #12
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

i think much depends on learning style, some learn through experience and just getting stuck in; trial and error, adapting a plan as you go along. Others want to read the manual, ask several freinds advice etc before even plugging a new electrical applicance in.

Despite me advising her there wasn't much that could go wrong, it was 6 months before my pensioner mother connected a printer to her new laptop, one step at the time she said! Some folk learn and make changes based at what they have learned at a very different rate to others.

Learning too much? you can only have currency is so many things, but if you learn something to the point where it is ingrained, or has developed permanent motor engrams (spelling?) then you can pick up lost skills or knowledge very quickly, with a little practice or a re-read of something you once knew well.

Perhaps there is something in the saying "jack of all trades, master of none", meaning you can only learn so much to a high level?
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Rick Methven
post 7.Mar.2012, 11:32 AM
Post #13
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE (Jamtjim @ 7.Mar.2012, 11:26 AM) *
I tend to learn quickly if the thing I have just done has hurt...

At the age of 18 months, I learnt that sticking a piece of copper wire into an electrical was not a smart thing to do
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Fishtank
post 7.Mar.2012, 11:41 AM
Post #14
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

Me too!!
Putting a divider from drawing set into el socket hurts to no end.
http://www.draftingsteals.com/20021.html
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skogsbo
post 7.Mar.2012, 11:43 AM
Post #15
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 7.Mar.2012, 10:32 AM) *
At the age of 18 months, I learnt that sticking a piece of copper wire into an electrical was not a smart thing to do

I learnt late fixing a washing machine once (only once though).
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