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Swedish Trip Switches and Fuses

WTF am I supposed to do with this?

jpenney
post 11.Jan.2011, 10:54 AM
Post #1
Joined: 5.May.2009

Morning,

Very basic electrician here (read: installed a few lights, switches etc...). Recently a couple of lights all stopped working at the same time, (shower room, bathroom and one of the bedrooms), 'Not a problem', I thought. One of them has blown and probably set off the trip switch. So I go take a look at the trip switch only to be greeted by a massive 'WTF'.

Image available here: http://i53.tinypic.com/ilveit.jpg

As you can see, the second-from-the-end (right) is the suspect here. But what on earth am I supposed to do with it? In the UK (as most of you will know) it is generally just an actual switch that can be flicked on and off.

So I open it up to the masses. Ideas?
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Johno
post 11.Jan.2011, 11:08 AM
Post #2
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Who gets first response in ? Its a row of ceramic fuse holders, lots of houses still have these. Unscrew the one with the dark blob - the dark blob is a tell tale to let you know its gone as you have guessed. Its should be safe to unscrew even without switching off with the buttons on the left (but dont stick your fingers in the hole exposed). Replace the fuse inside (large bulky thing) with one of the same size (important) which you can buy from any corner store. Solved.
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Jasoncarter
post 11.Jan.2011, 11:08 AM
Post #3
Joined: 1.Aug.2006

You see, Swedes laugh at British plumbing (haha - the waste pipes are on the outside of the house!) - but so many homes are full of this sort of horrible wiring and fusing straight from the 1930s.

Basically that's a row of fuse holders - the fuses themselves look like little ceramic wine bottles. Unscrew the round housing with the glass window that's holding the fuse in, pop down to Clas Ohlson or any electrical store with the fuse and buy a box of new ones, stick a new one in and screw the housing back on. I can't recall what current rating the red cap indicates, but there are different colours for different ampere ratings.
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jpenney
post 11.Jan.2011, 11:11 AM
Post #4
Joined: 5.May.2009

Nice one, chaps. I'll take a look at that today.

Learn something new everyday! smile.gif
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 11.Jan.2011, 11:18 AM
Post #5
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (Jasoncarter @ 11.Jan.2011, 12:08 PM) *
You see, Swedes laugh at British plumbing (haha - the waste pipes are on the outside of the house!) - but so many homes are full of this sort of horrible wiring and fusing straight from the 1930s.


The reason why Swedes and the rest of the civilized world often joke about British plumbing (and especially heating) is not because it is old, it is because it rarely works properly (substandard water pressure and freezing cold houses in winter time).

Old fusing may be old, but at least it works.
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Johno
post 11.Jan.2011, 11:23 AM
Post #6
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

QUOTE
The reason why Swedes and the rest of the civilized world often joke about British plumbing (and especially heating) is not because it is old, it is because it rarely works properly (substandard water pressure and freezing cold houses in winter time).

Gosh, I feel another serious quarrel coming on here. Nah, English central heating systems work perfectly ok but folks have them on time clocks so they are not on all the time. Houses are warm as toast if the heating is kept on for same reason. Water pressure has nothing to do with it. Yes there are old houses whose insulation is substandard, but I assert that its a myth for foreigners to poke fun at. wink.gif

You should see behind my cottage fuses, just like the ones in the picture, its like a birds nest of wires. We have a block of 3 main fuses, a block of 9 secondary fuses and 3 new circuit breakers for the refitted bathroom. At least thats safe. The previous owner had installed some "earthed" sockets in the kitchen dropped from the lighting circuit. When I tested them, the plugs for the fridge, toaster and kettle lacked any earth connection. Replaced pronto once discovered. Cottage DIY can be dodgy I have learnt.
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Bender B Rodriquez
post 11.Jan.2011, 11:28 AM
Post #7
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

QUOTE (Johno @ 11.Jan.2011, 12:23 PM) *
Gosh, I feel another serious quarrel coming on here. Nah, English central heating systems work perfectly ok but folks have them on time clocks so they are not on all the time ... (show full quote)


Yes, maybe it is the landlords who are to blame, but it is still frigging cold.

The water pressure is not related to the heat. My point was that those are the two main points foreigners complain about in British homes.
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Jamtjim
post 11.Jan.2011, 12:06 PM
Post #8
Joined: 11.Sep.2006

QUOTE
Gosh, I feel another serious quarrel coming on here. Nah, English central heating systems work perfectly ok but folks have them on time clocks so they are not on all the time. Houses are warm as toast if the heating is kept on for same reason. Water pressure has nothing to do with it. Yes there are old houses whose insulation is substandard, but I assert that its a myth for foreigners to poke fun at.


For once I tend to agree with you. Although by Swedish standards English houses are appallingly under insulated, the heating systems are perfectly able to heat them to a comfortable temperature if set to (although rather inefficiently). Personally I find Swedish homes a little too warm often being well over 22C, whereas my house is only heated to 19-20 and feels perfectly comfortable. Perhaps its just what one is used to.
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Streja
post 11.Jan.2011, 04:46 PM
Post #9
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

The reason why British central heating is crap is because of bad insulation and bad systems where the radiators are piping hot when they are on. In Sweden, Norway etc the heating systems work well because there is proper insulation (especially the windows) and the thermostats are good. So the radiators are rarely piping hot.

If British people had their radiators on all the time it would be very expensive as the heat just doesn't stay.

Often, in British houses you get condensation on the windows.

Stop pretending that you actually have a case.

smile.gif

Why not bang the drum when you actually have a point, like what about that BBC series that was just on SVT and saved my life.
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Streja
post 11.Jan.2011, 04:48 PM
Post #10
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Swedish houses are not 22C normally, but perhaps you have more brown meat on you, like the Inuits, so your body can take the cold.
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Johno
post 11.Jan.2011, 04:57 PM
Post #11
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Streja
QUOTE
Stop pretending that you actually have a case

Had to look and see whether Jamtjim had turned on me again. Anyway its my job on here to defend UK things, innit. Though seriously I think you are biased, it aint that bad, even if UK double glazing isnt as effective as Scandinavian. sad.gif
QUOTE
Why not bang the drum when you actually have a point, like what about that BBC series that was just on SVT and saved my life.

What series was that ? Clearly not about how to be nice to people as part of a new year resolution ? Sob, sob.
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Streja
post 11.Jan.2011, 05:02 PM
Post #12
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Just like it's my job to defend Swedish fuses!

It's actually not finished yet. I loooove Desperate Romantics and Emma. So much better than the Emma film from the 90's (which was good).

I would never defend mjukost or messmör. Those things should be outlawed and I am so sorry that you have to walk past those items in ICA on your weekly errrrr shopping sprees.
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Johno
post 11.Jan.2011, 05:16 PM
Post #13
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Oh jee, I never said I never liked Swedish fuses. That you can see which one has blown at a glance is brilliant. Though, on second thoughts they are nasty bulky things and a bit expensive to replace and should be banned immediately. But its Swedish DIY electrics I really dislike, but since the guy who did it ín my case is deceased I draw a line under that.
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Rick Methven
post 11.Jan.2011, 05:35 PM
Post #14
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE (Johno @ 11.Jan.2011, 05:16 PM) *
Oh jee, I never said I never liked Swedish fuses. That you can see which one has blown at a glance is brilliant. Though, on second thoughts they are nasty bulky things and a ... (show full quote)

The fuse system in my last (150 years old) house in the UK was deadly it was pre-war and required spare fuse wire to repair when blown. sad.gif

This house had a hodge poge of screw fuses and no earth breaker when I bought it as well as some 50 year old rubber coated wiring which was flaking away so I replaced the lot with a modern circuit breaker.

An English plumber who visited me here said that one reason that water pressure in Sweden is better than a lot of older houses in the UK is the narrower gauge pipes compared to the UK
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Johno
post 11.Jan.2011, 05:57 PM
Post #15
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

QUOTE
An English plumber who visited me here said that one reason that water pressure in Sweden is better than a lot of older houses in the UK is the narrower gauge pipes compared to the UK
Well I cant defend anyone who spouts crap like that. Narrower pipes restrict flow, and can only reduce pressure (when there is an actual flow), though probably not necessarily by much. Straight forward hydraulics.

Now whether UK water pressure really is lower than Sweden is a moot point. I have no idea, some will be pleased to know. But isnt a factor determining actual pressure whether you are uphill or downhill from the pump or reservoir since gravity will add to or reduce the pressure experienced at the tap. Its probably pretty variable depending on that factor whatever country you are in.
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