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Baking ingredient translations

Swedish/English names for flours, sugars, etc.

Claudster
post 9.Jun.2009, 08:46 AM
Post #1
Joined: 24.Jun.2007

Hi everyone,

I want to do some baking using my English recipies but I dont know the names of the ingredients in Swedish and my dictionary doesn't have them.

Does anyone know what these items are in Swedish?:

Self-raising flour
Caster sugar
Golden caster sugar
Icing sugar

Thanks!
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Jasoncarter
post 9.Jun.2009, 08:58 AM
Post #2
Joined: 1.Aug.2006

Icing sugar is Florsocker, sometimes also called pudersocker. The others aren't really widely available, particularly Self Raising flour which isn't sold in Sweden, save for at The English Shop (you can get all of the ingredients there).
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Princess P
post 9.Jun.2009, 09:08 AM
Post #3
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

Self raising flour is called Extra Fint Mjöl from Kungsörnen and is available in ICA.

Alternatively you can just use plain flour and add 1 tsp baking powder per 8 oz flour.

I haven't found caster sugar so use normal sugar instead. For most recipes this works fine. If you really want a finer sugar the easier thing to do is whiz it round in the food processor for a moment before using it.
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amira helenius
post 9.Jun.2009, 09:10 AM
Post #4
Location: United States
Joined: 5.Nov.2008

Self rising flour is sold in Sweden , I don't know the name of it, I will ask my husband when he is home coz he is Swedish coz he always help me , I bought it many times, you will find it where they sell these ready powder for cakes and bread , it is in a bag that look the same like the flour bag but smaller, it is very good , I will come back with the name later today:)
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Jasoncarter
post 9.Jun.2009, 09:12 AM
Post #5
Joined: 1.Aug.2006

QUOTE (Princess P @ 9.Jun.2009, 10:08 AM) *
Self raising flour is called Extra Fint Mjöl from Kungsörnen and is available in ICA.

crikey - well I never knew that:

http://www.axa.se/sv/produkter/produkt/?product=224

Brilliantly descriptive product name there.
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Claudster
post 9.Jun.2009, 09:32 AM
Post #6
Joined: 24.Jun.2007

thanks everyone.

I can always depend on your quick knowledgeable replies!

I LOVE THE LOCAL!
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ShaneW
post 9.Jun.2009, 09:55 AM
Post #7
Joined: 18.Oct.2007

You can get caster sugar..I baked a blueberry crumble last week so had to look it up, its strösocker.
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Princess P
post 9.Jun.2009, 10:00 AM
Post #8
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

That's just normal granulated sugar.
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Nuname
post 9.Jun.2009, 11:26 AM
Post #9
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Apr.2005

I've had caster sugar. It's called Finkornigt Strösocker.
Here's a link:
http://www.dansukker.com/Default.aspx?ID=9...1&GroupID=7
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Nuname
post 9.Jun.2009, 11:28 AM
Post #10
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Apr.2005

QUOTE (Jasoncarter @ 9.Jun.2009, 10:12 AM) *
crikey - well I never knew that:. http://www.axa.se/sv/produkter/produkt/?product=224. Brilliantly descriptive product name there.


Yes thanks for that. And there was I thinking it was just extra finely ground flour. What a fool I am!
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Lp74
post 9.Jun.2009, 01:13 PM
Post #11
Joined: 17.Mar.2006

Castor sugar definitely exists. I can't remember the name but it is in a box, not a bag... and is with all the other sugars...
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ShaneW
post 9.Jun.2009, 02:20 PM
Post #12
Joined: 18.Oct.2007

QUOTE (Princess P @ 9.Jun.2009, 11:00 AM) *
That's just normal granulated sugar.


Not according to Norstedts Dictionary and the blueberry crumble turned out fine, maybe I got lucky at ICA by grabbing the right kind of sugar.
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