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What language do your kids speak?

Beth
post 16.Apr.2006, 04:40 PM
Post #16
Joined: 15.Sep.2004

funnily enough, i used to speak to dogs in hungarian laugh.gif
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*Guest*
post 16.Apr.2006, 06:01 PM
Post #17


My dog speaks American. I keep telling him this is going to be an issue and he needs to start saying "vov" stat, but he just rolls his eyes and licks me.
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Beth
post 16.Apr.2006, 06:45 PM
Post #18
Joined: 15.Sep.2004

yet another arrogant american immigrant who thinks it's ok to come to sweden and not bother learning the language...then he's going to complain that the rest of the dogs in the neighborhood are too cold to get to know, won't talk to him, sniff a funny way and sit at home just collected dog biscuts...

and to boot he's a svartskalle...svartrygg, svartallt :twisted:
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David Taylor
post 16.Apr.2006, 07:00 PM
Post #19
Joined: 14.Nov.2005

well my girls are Swedish you know so they are very happy here in there world where everyone is right. Even when they run off they feel they are in the right.
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Irish_Bog
post 16.Apr.2006, 08:03 PM
Post #20
Joined: 12.Sep.2005

Let me add my vote to the "speak your own language" movement.

I'm Irish, my wife Swedish. To our kids (4 and 2) I speak English and my wife Swedish.
To each other it's a mix, probably 70% English.

I think it's vital that our kids only have correct language spoken to them, so
that they don't get bad Swedish from me, or slightly incorrect (careful careful)
English from my wife.

My oldest mainly speaks Swedish back to me but that's OK. When my mother
came over, the speed with which he started using English with her made
it all seem worthwhile. He speaks with a Swedish accent but you can't
have everything...

P.S. I am guilty of the "eat your korv, we need to go to the dagis" :-(
Though to be honest it's only about 10-15 words that I do this with.
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Roowhip
post 16.Apr.2006, 08:44 PM
Post #21
Joined: 16.Sep.2005

QUOTE
I think it's vital that our kids only have correct language spoken to them, so
that they don't get bad Swedish from me, or slightly incorrect (careful careful)
English from my wife.


Irish_bog, I spoke to a language expert in Aus and what you say above is the reason he gave that you should speak your native language with your child.

QUOTE
P.S. I am guilty of the "eat your korv, we need to go to the dagis"

lol..I am guity too but it's not a problem, especially with nouns. I mean, "I'm going to get some wine from the systembolaget" wouldn't have the same meaning if I said bottleshop-an Aussie bottleshop is not a "translation"for systembolaget laugh.gif laugh.gif
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Leonard
post 16.Apr.2006, 09:33 PM
Post #22
Joined: 2.Nov.2005

The quality of English spoken among Swedes today is a joke. I believe they may even speak better in France...


Someone is a joke. The level of English in Sweden among people under 40 is truely amazing. I think if your kids grow up in Sweden they will speak English and Swedish fluently regardless if you speak Japanese at home. Most people i have met here speak perfect English and Swedish and most are speaking some at Spanish, French and German. Amazing!
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Benzed
post 17.Apr.2006, 04:18 AM
Post #23
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 1.Nov.2005

This is one of the most interesting topics I`ve read on here. Which...isn`t saying much obviously! But I think about this subject strangely often the longer I`m away from home, when considering "the future". Some people think of spaceships and robots doing their laundry for them, while I focus more on the need to actually marry a foreign lass and raise bilingual children. The worst thing about New Zealand in my opinion, is the utter lack of linguistic focus in schools... though that is changing now, to bloody Cantonese or Japanese :roll:

My father was a language teacher, and the way his European language subjects have faded off the schooling map back home and been replaced because we now "want the country to become part of Asia" seriously aggrieves me.

The best looking girlfriend I had was Scottish (I know that sounds ridiculous - no ginger hair or freckles in sight, I swear) ) , but what could she have offered our children aside from terms like haggis, skag, and some moderately clever words for vagina and whiskey. Great.
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Muckle
post 17.Apr.2006, 08:31 AM
Post #24
Joined: 7.Sep.2005

Wow! A hopeful post on a slow Easter Saturday - and suddenly I have more helpful responses than I ever expected. Superb - thanks to all of you.

All of the above confirms the speak-two-languages thing, but I was surprised how many of you said that it's purely English at home. Beth (and others), we're like you - English is the home language and even the missus feels uncomfortable speaking Swedish at home.

But my concern was that if we're both speaking English at home, life might be a tad difficult for the child when it (don't know the sex yet) goes to dagis/school. Isn't it better if the child can communicate in the language the other kids use? (Although I suppose if dagis begins at 18 months, deep conversation isn't really what it's all about.) I just don't want our language situation to make things harder.

School's a LONG way off but thanks for the tip about "Modersmål", Billy - had no idea about that. Also, as you did, I think the time spent in the English-language country (conveniently, England, in my case) is going to be very important.

The one thing I disagree with is the comment that Swedes are rubbish at English. There's quite a variation - which I've noticed the longer I've been here - but in general I have nothing but respect for Swedes' ability with English.

Thanks again, everyone.
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Beth
post 17.Apr.2006, 09:59 AM
Post #25
Joined: 15.Sep.2004

QUOTE (Muckle)
But my concern was that if we're both speaking English at home, life might be a tad difficult for the child when it (don't know the sex yet) goes to dagis/school. Isn't it better if the child can communicate in the language the other kids use? (Although I suppose if dagis begins at 18 months, deep conversation isn't really what it's all about.) I just don't want our language situation to make things harder.


i can't say whether our child had it more difficult or just the same. he easily adjusted, loved being among the other kids...he would have copied any kid regardless of language.

besides, when he started (17 months) he didn't say anything except for CAR. and now all the dagis kids know some English :wink:
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Married To An Aussie
post 17.Apr.2006, 11:30 AM
Post #26
Joined: 4.Feb.2006

QUOTE (Billy)
As for learning English in School...Speak to your school principle. They Swedish school system has a program called "Modersmål" where your children can start English classes once a week from the first year at school. My Kids do that.
Remember it's every childs RIGHT, and god knows we live in a country all about rights. Right?


Even though it's every child's RIGHT to get Modersmål, everyone DOESN'T get it.
I believed my children would have the right to it but when they started school we were told it's up to each kommun what rules they have. In the kommun where we live, there need to be at least 5 children who require English as modersmål. The last two years there haven't been enough applicants so my kids don't get it. Very disappointing. So, I think you should check what rules your kommun have on modersmål. I took it for granted that my kids would get it when we moved to Sweden and here we are with no modersmål for the kids. sad.gif
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*Guest*
post 17.Apr.2006, 11:31 AM
Post #27


Hey to everyone!
I would like to put my 2 cents in! My children are grown up now and live in Australia and I live permanantly here in Sweden. I lived most of my life in Australia so English is my native language. I was born in Sweden but can speak only enough to make myself understood if I need to. My family here speak both English and Swedish to me, 70% English and 30% Swedish.
My point is if I were to have children here they would be fluent in Swedish and English. I think English is the most important to learn as you can almost always find someone that will understand some English. I have found that you cannot learn English here properly as the the teachers are not native speakers and tend to lean towards a Swedish/English accent.
At SFI I am the only native English speaker out 150 pupils so sometimes the teachers ask me to take their English classes for them so their students can here first hand how the language is spoken properly. I must admit I have a lot of fun doing this and the students like to here me speak.
I think a lot has to do with my aussie accent which I still have apparently, I have been told that listening to me is like listening to "crocodile dundee" with out the hat.
What ever you decide for your children make sure that they are fluent in English because nearly all international company's only use English to converse in, so if they are to have every job opportunity this is a must!!!!!
If you are lucky enough to have both a fluent English and Swedish speaker in the household you have the best of both worlds and your children will only prosper from it. Be carefull to constantly correct your childrens mistakes, as I did with mine. To speak English incorrectly is the mark of an un-educated person and can often be why some people are employed and some aren't.
My advice is too teach both and to do it properly!!!!!!
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*Guest*
post 17.Apr.2006, 06:35 PM
Post #28


Here's what we did on the other side of the pond...

My husband is Swedish and I have never lived there. When my kids were born I had taken some Swedish classes but my reading was much better than my spoken language. Husband and I spoke primarily English at home, with a few Swedish words thrown in.

We decided that since there were really no other opportunities for them to learn Swedish other than at home, we would speak as much Swedish as possible with them. My husband spoke (and continues to speak) exclusively Swedish with them both inside and outside the home (even in situations of "mixed company" where there are non-Swedish speakers present -- we or the kids just translate as needed). I speak a mixture of Swedish and English. My theory is that we have been learning together, and my own Swedish has improved dramatically. I have never worried much about teaching them the wrong thing in Swedish as I can look things up or call my in-laws, or my husband will correct me -- and now my kids correct me more often than he does. laugh.gif

My husband has been a stickler about Swedish only and it has paid off big time. Now we are lucky enough to have the kids in a Swedish school on Saturdays and they are among the most fluent ones there.

If the situation were reversed and we moved to Sweden, I'm sure that I would speak mostly English with them in the home so they would not lose their ability in English.

It's been interesting. We had periods where my daughter would refuse to speak Swedish at all. She understood everything her father said, but would answer in English. We've just finished a period where both kids would not speak Swedish to ME even if I spoke it with them.

Honestly I think the best advice from my point of view is to bombard the child with as much of the non-country language as possible, since they will get the native language everywhere around them. Try to be mellow about it and not freak out if you feel like you're having a setback. Be consistent with whatever method you choose and eventually they will catch on.

Lycka till!
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*Guest*
post 18.Apr.2006, 09:02 AM
Post #29


Sorry Roowhip, but you?re missing the point ? and you?re in denial. There?s nothing wrong with referring to specific Swedish nouns and terms such as ?Systembolaget?, ?Strycktipset?, or ?Melodifestival? as these are actual names (although I know a few die-hards who say ?off-licence?, ?the pools? or ?Eurovision heats?). English has even taken in Swedish words like smorgasbord and ombudsman but ?dagis?? Don?t think so.

Nursery, daycare, playgroup ? take your pick. Ever heard of the term ?first-language attrition? (which is when your native language gets worse while your second/third language improves)? It happens to us all and it?s a natural part of learning a language, but the way to stop the rot is to see how many Swedish words you use when good English ones will do.

You say the ?main thing is not to get so hung up on language?. I agree, but up to a point. Language ? like it or not ? is a part of what defines us and our kids. Baloney? No, just common sense.
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Mike
post 18.Apr.2006, 11:53 AM
Post #30
Joined: 14.Mar.2005

QUOTE (Sound Of Confusion)
I only speak English.

She only speaks Swedish.

Little'un speaks both.

Be strict, stay strong. It'll be worth it in the long run.


That's what we do too. None of this flip-flopping crap. One parent always speaks one language, and the other always speaks the other. It keeps the little ones from getting confused.
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