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The Local _ Life in Sweden _ Moving to Sweden with a disability

Posted by: hrafn.enginnson 28.Apr.2019, 11:22 AM

Hi everyone,

I am looking to move to Sweden. However, it's a little more complicated than just that.
At the moment I receive a welfare check because I am disabled. The laws and regulations in my country allow me to move abroad (within the European Union) and take this check with me.
My (mental) disabilities (yes, there's more than one) complicate my life in several ways. It helps when I am in nature, when I'm not around a lot of people. Unfortunately, the country I live in is quite ... full, in the sense that there's very little nature left. And what nature that there's left, you're not allowed to live in it. The few natural spaces that you are allowed to live in, are cramped with people.

The choice for Sweden is simple. For many years I have been fascinated with Scandinavia. Expense-wise - generally speaking - Sweden is just a bit more expensive than where I live (Norway being generally 50% more expensive, Iceland being 56% more expensive).
I won't deny that Iceland's my first choice, but other than the fact that Iceland is a lot more expensive (I can take my welfare check with me, but it stays the same as where I live; it does not go up or down according to the living standard of where I live, which is why most people with a welfare check who move abroad, go to southern countries), the language is also a lot harder than Swedish.


What is the intent of my post here?

1) Well, first of all, I'd like some imput. I want opinions. Would you welcome me into your country, knowing that I won't actively contribute to society? Do note, while my current country would still pay my welfare check, I would pay taxes in Sweden. Also, I am an artist and whenever I do earn money from my creative works (it doesn't happen often), I will also pay Swedish taxes on them.

2) I am looking for "insider information". I'm looking for something like an ideal location. I am looking for property (either a house, or a plot of land where I can build a house) somewhere in the middle of Sweden.

2.1) Ideally, I'd like to grow my own crops. Is the middle of Sweden (I was thinking somewhere between Hudiksvall and Skellefteå) good enough to grow crops? Which crops could be grown there? (I have found several posts on this forum about growing crops, but most of them were about south Sweden).

2.2) What are good websites to go looking for property in those areas? Which websites should I avoid? (sites available in English are a plus, but not a requirement; I am still very early in the process of learning Swedish, but I can make due with Google Translate)

2.3) Is the middle of Sweden calm enough in the sense that you can live remotely alone, but not too isolated that you have to drive for hours to get some groceries?

I'm certain I have a lot more questions, but I'll start with these.


Sorry for the long and complicated post. I appreciate all the help I can get.
Thank you so much.

Posted by: intrepidfox 28.Apr.2019, 03:17 PM

If you do not have money, a job offer or accommodation then forget it

Posted by: Bsmith 29.Apr.2019, 01:25 AM

Sweden's long and dark winters may not be the best for your condition depending upon what it is. In answer to your question: will you be welcomed with open arms? I would have to say that you, if you are a private person who keeps to yourself, will get the same welcome as anyone else. Which is to say that you will be essentially ignored. Not trying to be flippant here, but Sweden's people are very private and not what I would characterize as being outgoing. A generalization for sure but much truth in it.

I do wish you luck in your journey. I happened to enjoy my time in Sweden, but it is not for everyone.

Posted by: Bsmith 29.Apr.2019, 01:28 AM

Oh, and as to your agriculture question, you do realize you are looking at an area that is not prone to lots of cultivation. Cold weather crops and hunting and fishing are the traditional means of self subsistence.

Posted by: skogsbo 29.Apr.2019, 10:48 AM

You don't need to move that far north. You can live 30-50km outside any major city in complete isolation.

Look at a map of climate zones. Anything 3 or higher and your growing seasons will be pretty short. Still possible, just more challenging.

Posted by: Gjeebes 29.Apr.2019, 05:04 PM

So, OP, you are personally wealthy? If not, then don't waste your time.

Sure, in the north you can buy a piece of sh#t old farm house for peanuts, but it still isn't worth the life you will give up, by moving to the Greasy Meatball.

Stay where you are, it can't possibly be worse than Meatballia.

PS: The "locals" are like Gypsies. You will never be accepted as a native Meatball (a blessing in fact, but impractical whilst living there).

Posted by: Svedallas 29.Apr.2019, 07:44 PM

QUOTE (intrepidfox @ 28.Apr.2019, 04:17 PM) *
If you do not have money, a job offer or accommodation then forget it


Exactly.

Before getting your hopes up, you need a visa to stay in Sweden.

You can't just pick and select where you want to live. You cannot go to immigation and tell them you just had a fascination with Scandinavia? Your fascination will cost you getting a job here, finding a place to live, and proving to the authorities that you can sustain yourself without going on any social benefits, which is solely for residents.


This is not the 1950s. There are residency and visa requirements and regulations in Sweden.

Do your thorough research before posting. It is a waste of your and our time.

As you state "welfare benefits", it is a assumption that you are American.
There is a lot of nature in America, beautiful, I might add.

Search there.

Posted by: skogsbo 29.Apr.2019, 09:32 PM

QUOTE (Svedallas @ 29.Apr.2019, 06:44 PM) *
Exactly.

Before getting your hopes up, you need a visa to stay in Sweden.

You can't just pick and select where you want to live. You cannot go to immigation and tell them you just had a fascination with Scandinavia? Your fascination will cost you getting a job here, finding a place to live, and proving to the authorities that you can sustain yourself without going on any social benefits, which is solely for residents.


This is not the 1950s. There are residency and visa requirements and regulations in Sweden.

Do your thorough research before posting. It is a waste of your and our time.

As you state "welfare benefits", it is a assumption that you are American.
There is a lot of nature in America, beautiful, I might add.

Search there.

I'd speculate they are from the eu, because of their wording. But not the UK because of their spelling of cheque.

Posted by: hrafn.enginnson 30.Apr.2019, 09:07 AM

First of all, thanks for all the replies :-)

I am from Belgium. I have been told that it is possible to migrate freely within the EU. And the money that I receive for my disabilities, will remain, no matter where I live (within the EU). It does not make me wealthy, but it's enough to survive.
The social benefits that I receive - even when I should live in Sweden - will be paid by Belgium (why, I have no idea, seems like a flaw [the ethical / moral point of living abroad of domestic benefits is a whole other discussion, and yes, it is something that bothers me as well. But I intend to 'use' it until I can find another way to support myself]).

I understand that it is required to work, but ... due to my disabilities, I am unable to work. Here, in Belgium, the doctors even forbid me to work. Which is why I spend a lot of my free time creating art.

The long and dark winters are indeed cause for some concern. I suffer from depression, among other things.
Before actually moving permanently, I do intend to stay there for at least a year, so get a feel of what it's like. But before I can decide where I want to settle, I'm looking for input (rather than trying to check out fifteen different areas, trying to live there for a year each ...).

Hunting and fishing is out of the question for me as I'm a vegan. And yes, I've had plenty of talks with non-vegans from all over Scandinavia about how hard it is to live off a plant-based diet there :-)
The crops that I'd want to grow, would merely be an addition to produce I buy from the grocery stores; just a little extra. And, growing crops is a fun activity.

As for the life I'm giving up where I live ... I absolutely don't like it here (I might be spoiled, I know. I live in a city; everything's close-by; besides the number of people in the city and the noises from traffic, there's not really anything I can complain about). I want a simpler life. A quieter life. I need peace and quiet.
That doesn't mean I'd take the first thing that comes by. I have considered living in a small hut in a forest or something similar; but I have to admit that I'm used to some luxuries like a decent toilet, running water and heating. I wish I wasn't. I'd love to be able to live in nature, all by myself, off the grid. It would seem amazing.
I have tried to search for property and found houses that were in terrible condition.

I don't intend to have a lot of contact with the locals (I'm not much of a people-person), but I can certainly understand that it can be handy to be on friendly terms with them.

Please do know that I am doing research about this as well. It's not just some fad or wild idea.

Again, thank you everyone for your responses. I do appreciate the time and effort.

Posted by: Bsmith 30.Apr.2019, 12:18 PM

Being able to work and support yourself gives a person a sense of dignity and purpose. I am sorry that you are not able to experience that. Perhaps there is some manner of purposeful activity you can engage in even if it is volunteer work. You certainly seem intelligent enough although perhaps a bit naive.

Also, have you done any research on the effects of your vegan lifestyle and how it may be having an effect upon your mental condition? There are several long chain fatty acids as well as amino acids that are essential to good brain health and are very difficult to obtain in a strictly plant diet.


Posted by: Svedallas 30.Apr.2019, 02:06 PM

QUOTE (hrafn.enginnson @ 30.Apr.2019, 10:07 AM) *
First of all, thanks for all the replies :-)

I am from Belgium. I have been told that it is possible to migrate freely within the EU. And the money that I receive for my disabilities, will remain, no matter where I live (within the EU). It does not make me wealthy, but it's enough to survive.
The social benefits that I receive - even when I should live in Sweden - will be paid by Belgium (why, I have no idea, seems like a flaw [the ethical / moral point of living abroad of domestic benefits is a whole other discussion, and yes, it is something that bothers me as well. But I intend to 'use' it until I can find another way to support myself]).

I understand that it is required to work, but ... due to my disabilities, I am unable to work. Here, in Belgium, the doctors even forbid me to work. Which is why I spend a lot of my free time creating art.

The long and dark winters are indeed cause for some concern. I suffer from depression, among other things.
Before actually moving permanently, I do intend to stay there for at least a year, so get a feel of what it's like. But before I can decide where I want to settle, I'm looking for input (rather than trying to check out fifteen different areas, trying to live there for a year each ...).

Hunting and fishing is out of the question for me as I'm a vegan. And yes, I've had plenty of talks with non-vegans from all over Scandinavia about how hard it is to live off a plant-based diet there :-)
The crops that I'd want to grow, would merely be an addition to produce I buy from the grocery stores; just a little extra. And, growing crops is a fun activity.

As for the life I'm giving up where I live ... I absolutely don't like it here (I might be spoiled, I know. I live in a city; everything's close-by; besides the number of people in the city and the noises from traffic, there's not really anything I can complain about). I want a simpler life. A quieter life. I need peace and quiet.
That doesn't mean I'd take the first thing that comes by. I have considered living in a small hut in a forest or something similar; but I have to admit that I'm used to some luxuries like a decent toilet, running water and heating. I wish I wasn't. I'd love to be able to live in nature, all by myself, off the grid. It would seem amazing.
I have tried to search for property and found houses that were in terrible condition.

I don't intend to have a lot of contact with the locals (I'm not much of a people-person), but I can certainly understand that it can be handy to be on friendly terms with them.

Please do know that I am doing research about this as well. It's not just some fad or wild idea.

Again, thank you everyone for your responses. I do appreciate the time and effort.


"The long and dark winters are indeed cause for some concern. I suffer from depression, among other things."

Sweden is not for you.

Posted by: Anisette 2.May.2019, 05:43 AM

Have you ever thought about moving to Northern Spain instead? Such as the Galicia area? It is quite nice there and one can buy a farm there for very little. It is quite a fertile area, nice weather, and not too crowded ..so you could go self sufficient there and many do. My husband and I were thinking about doing it. Currently we live in Sweden but I think Spain is a lot easier place to go self sufficent then Sweden. And the winters are quite dark here.

I know that there was a fun book about being self sufficeint in Spain called "Driving over Lemons". The guy who wrote it lives in a different area of Spain but has done it for over 20 years.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 2.May.2019, 05:34 PM

QUOTE (hrafn.enginnson @ 28.Apr.2019, 12:22 PM) *
Hi everyone,

I am looking to move to Sweden. However, it's a little more complicated than just that.
At the moment I receive a welfare check because I am disabled. The laws and regulations in my country allow me to move abroad (within the European Union) and take this check with me.
My (mental) disabilities (yes, there's more than one) complicate my life in several ways. It helps when I am in nature, when I'm not around a lot of people. Unfortunately, the country I live in is quite ... full, in the sense that there's very little nature left. And what nature that there's left, you're not allowed to live in it. The few natural spaces that you are allowed to live in, are cramped with people.

The choice for Sweden is simple. For many years I have been fascinated with Scandinavia. Expense-wise - generally speaking - Sweden is just a bit more expensive than where I live (Norway being generally 50% more expensive, Iceland being 56% more expensive).
I won't deny that Iceland's my first choice, but other than the fact that Iceland is a lot more expensive (I can take my welfare check with me, but it stays the same as where I live; it does not go up or down according to the living standard of where I live, which is why most people with a welfare check who move abroad, go to southern countries), the language is also a lot harder than Swedish.


What is the intent of my post here?

1) Well, first of all, I'd like some imput. I want opinions. Would you welcome me into your country, knowing that I won't actively contribute to society? Do note, while my current country would still pay my welfare check, I would pay taxes in Sweden. Also, I am an artist and whenever I do earn money from my creative works (it doesn't happen often), I will also pay Swedish taxes on them.

2) I am looking for "insider information". I'm looking for something like an ideal location. I am looking for property (either a house, or a plot of land where I can build a house) somewhere in the middle of Sweden.

2.1) Ideally, I'd like to grow my own crops. Is the middle of Sweden (I was thinking somewhere between Hudiksvall and Skellefteå) good enough to grow crops? Which crops could be grown there? (I have found several posts on this forum about growing crops, but most of them were about south Sweden).

2.2) What are good websites to go looking for property in those areas? Which websites should I avoid? (sites available in English are a plus, but not a requirement; I am still very early in the process of learning Swedish, but I can make due with Google Translate)

2.3) Is the middle of Sweden calm enough in the sense that you can live remotely alone, but not too isolated that you have to drive for hours to get some groceries?

I'm certain I have a lot more questions, but I'll start with these.


Sorry for the long and complicated post. I appreciate all the help I can get.
Thank you so much.



Why not move to the countryside in Belgium? Sweden is not welcoming to anyone. They are more friendly if you are just visiting. I split my time between us and Sweden and at first people are friendly thinking I’m a visitor, then suspicious when I say I live here (first question is what my job is), then relieved when I say it’s part time only when consulting the Swedish branch of my business. There is always a moment of panic in swedes when there are foreigners living amongst them.

Iceland is beautiful but if you were thinking of growing crops there then you must have been thinking of a greenhouse... in that case anywhere in Sweden would be fine, no?

Otherwise, as someone mentioned, Spain would be a hell of a lot nicer, people, culture, food, weather, than Sweden would be.

And the eu isn’t so people can just go and move to whatever eu country they want. They get 3 months vacation visa free and then if they find work then they are able to live if sustainability requirements are met... don’t know how it would be with a disability check as your main source of income.

I honestly have no clue what the benefits of the EU are for civilians... seems like it’s just a failed trade deal/ attempt to unify and strengthen economies.

Good luck... but honestly, look elsewhere. Sweden is miserable... like the Pink Floyd song, “ hanging on in quiet desperation is the (Swedish) way”


Posted by: pepitoAndalucia 8.May.2019, 09:46 PM

QUOTE (hrafn.enginnson @ 28.Apr.2019, 12:22 PM) *
Hi everyone,

I am looking to move to Sweden. However, it's a little more complicated than just that.

Thank you so much.


Hi,

I am Spanish so I can give you my personal opinion.

Sweden and most Scandinavian looks good from outside but I can tell you everyday life is a completely different story.

1- First of all if you suffer from depression then I absolutely do not recommend you moving to Sweden. In general the weather is not friendly at all and in here even with climate change, weather is cold most of the year, after October until well into march is all about dark days and very cloudy with a lot of rain in general. The more north you live the darker the winters. So if you suffer from depression then that is going to be a problem in my opinion.

2- The culture. True is swedes and most Scandinavian are polite. You are not going to find rude people in the streets or rude neighbors, but in general people are really cold and distant. Making sporadic chat with other people is almost impossible unless you join activities. And people in the street are always avoiding even eye contact.(difficult to explain with words)
I have been in a supermarket and seeing an elderly trying to grab a shopping cart and nobody even looked at her. I helped her and she opened her eyes surprised. That will give you an idea.
People sit alone on the bus and avoid sitting next to someone. Women are even worse because they leave their hand bags in the sit next to them.

https://www.indy100.com/article/the-best-and-worst-countries-in-the-world-for-making-friends--WkbWdgjoXdZ

3- Life is overpriced, because you pay more but the quality of the food is not as good. Eating out is expensive for the food you get and supermarkets don't sell a wide range of products.

4- If you want to live absolutely alone and without anybody around you then sweden can work out but the price is high. ISOLATION. Because in sweden you are invisible. Nobody cares.

Spain is not the perfect place unlike scandinavian is trying to portray themselves.

But I can tell you a few things about Spain.

1- Outside the cities Spain is not overpopulated and you will find plenty of places with small population. Just 20km from city center. Northern Spain is really great because it is colder but not as cold as Sweden. Low population, quiet towns, very rural life in general.

2- Food and gastronomy is really good and cheaper than Sweden. Not only you will be able to enjoy better healthier food but you won't have to pay as much.

3- Culture. Spaniards are very friendly and someone with a disability like you will find people in the street who will try to help you cross the street if you need help. That's the way we are. Chatting with strangers in the street is quiet common, whether you are waiting for the bus or buying some groceries at the supermarket, we don't mind having small talk.

4- If you suffer from depression Spain can be a good antidote. Some sunlight, friendlier culture, you can live in a quite rural area but still without being invisible as it happens in scandinavian countries.

Problems about Spain:
- High unemployment, which in your case doesn't matter.
- Bureaucracy is higher than in Sweden so getting things done in the administrative aspect is not as easy and straight forward.
- Almost nobody speaks English so you will have to learn Spanish.
- You can get some kilos because tapas is really good. smile.gif




I live in Sweden because in my country there is no work. But I admit life in Sweden is boring and sad and when it's about meeting love or people is like if swedes were afraid. People in general look like nobody paid attention to their surroundings, like tunnel vision. I say hi at someone at the bus stop and she doesn't even look at me. It's a very passive harsh country that looks good on paper because of the constant hype on the news and media. But day by day, I have never seen so many difficulties in my life. Specially for a culture that calls itself "the best on earth".
From finding rental housing and work everything is wall after wall and people are very passive. People speak good English but almost nobody will talk to you but only the necessary or for politeness but no deep conversations no connection.

This is a very very cold culture. Many move to Sweden for work or to follow their love ones. But if you have a disability and are alone with not family and no daily job... hmmm. Avoid Sweden.

Posted by: bonviveur 9.May.2019, 06:10 AM

Pepitoandalucia wrote good overview of swedish way of life, but if you are looking to be left alone, ignored by locals and surounded by nature Sweden is your choice.
Belgium also have nice places to live by the way, I did lived in Flanders for a while and can say there is plently of nature over there with small villages in between.
But you can always try living where you want, just do not buy property or other anchor right away, good luck

Posted by: Bsmith 9.May.2019, 12:27 PM

QUOTE (pepitoAndalucia @ 8.May.2019, 09:46 PM) *
I live in Sweden because in my country there is no work.



So instead of staying in the country you love and acting as an agent for change, you choose to run away to Sweden. Fine. Looking out for #1 and all that jazz, but don't continue to bemoan how piss poor everything in Sweden is. No one asked you to move there.

Posted by: pepitoAndalucia 9.May.2019, 06:24 PM

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 9.May.2019, 01:27 PM) *
So instead of staying in the country you love and acting as an agent for change, you choose to run away to Sweden. Fine. Looking out for #1 and all that jazz, but don't continue to bemoan how piss poor everything in Sweden is. No one asked you to move there.



We do what we can in order to pay the rent every month.

QUOTE
I live in Sweden because in my country there is no work.

Posted by: Bsmith 9.May.2019, 07:23 PM

Do you send money back? If not, you are not helping your beloved country and things will never get better.

Meanwhile, you are stuck someplace where you are obviously miserable in order to survive.

Just saying...

Posted by: skogsbo 9.May.2019, 09:24 PM

QUOTE (pepitoAndalucia @ 9.May.2019, 05:24 PM) *
We do what we can in order to pay the rent every month.

Iinteresting position, you criticise the country that feeds you and praise one that can't!!

Posted by: Bsmith 10.May.2019, 11:15 AM

I understand how tough it can be moving to a new country. You have to learn a new language, new customs, new laws...everything is different. I remember the first time I pulled up to a gas pump in Sweden and it took me 5 minutes to figure out how to use the damn thing, a task that I had performed thousands of time at home without a second thought. The whole ordeal of living in a new land is immensely stressful.

And I also get how nostalgia for home and family and friends kicks in and makes you long for your old home place.

But you either make peace with it, or you will be miserable. Or you move back. Those are really the only choices.

Posted by: pepitoAndalucia 11.May.2019, 03:45 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 9.May.2019, 10:24 PM) *
Iinteresting position, you criticise the country that feeds you and praise one that can't!!


Wrong, they don't feed me. I feed myself with my effort.

No sweden is not a paradise it's very well designed trap.

Spain cannot offer me a job, but Spain is not a trap. Spain doesn't have queues for rentals, Spain doesn't have massive ghettos as Sweden has. Spain doesn't use their language to filter as you swedes do.

So please, stop the passive aggression, I have seen it for a long time. I know you all have money and no life but please don't bitch when the only thing of value you have is high wages and a secured job.

Posted by: pepitoAndalucia 11.May.2019, 03:58 PM

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 10.May.2019, 12:15 PM) *
I understand how tough it can be moving to a new country. You have to learn a new language, new customs, new laws...everything is different. I remember the first time I pulled up to a gas pump in Sweden and it took me 5 minutes to figure out how to use the damn thing, a task that I had performed thousands of time at home without a second thought. The whole ordeal of living in a new land is immensely stressful.

And I also get how nostalgia for home and family and friends kicks in and makes you long for your old home place.

But you either make peace with it, or you will be miserable. Or you move back. Those are really the only choices.


I am not miserable, actually I have met swedes who take antidepressants despite they have good salaries and job security.

I do work out 4 times a week, I try to have fun with my limited resources, weather doesn't affect me at all, passive aggressive people like you doesn't even touch my skin. For what I have seen around me, I am quite happy.

I know here in scandinavian, passive aggression and passive bullying is common. I know that since violence is not seen as something acceptable you all jump like snakes to make passive aggressive comments about others.

I must tell you, I am a survivor in sweden, I have managed to live here despite all the odds, despite the jokes about my culture, despite the well hidden segregation, despite your insults. I managed, I am not miserable.

Met many swedes who confess they are miserable. They have secured jobs, a car, a house, family, money in their pockets to travel anywhere. And despite that, they are miserable.

I have little money, no car, no secured job, no fixed apartment but despite it I am not miserable. I cannot be beaten by weather, or passive agressive people like you and your friends in this forum because most likely I am stronger than you.

Neither the weather or the scandinavian passive aggression and passive bullying can beat me, because most likely I am stronger than the average including you and your sneaky friends.

I know many are affected by the weather, I am not. Most likely you are. Most likely I am stronger than you.

What amazes me is this thread started as something to share and you and your sneaky friends are coming here to insult me with passive aggressive comments.

Miserable me?. No way, MISERABLE YOU!.

Posted by: Bsmith 11.May.2019, 06:34 PM

Sorry, your constant complaints and insults hurled at every imaginable aspect of life in Sweden led me to believe that you were a miserable wretch. I had no idea that you were such a happy, sunshiney, optimistic person. Life of the party, never complains, always helpful and courteous. Yes, a regular fount of joy. Miscellaneous people seek you out as inspiration on how to navigate through the difficulties of life with a calm and graceful demeanor. A veritable guru of happiness.

Oh, and am not passive aggressive at all. When I need to get aggressive, I get right after it.

Posted by: skogsbo 11.May.2019, 06:49 PM

Regardless of how you wrap it up, where are you happiest? Jobless in Spain, employed in Sweden?

Absolutely no where is perfect we can find faults in any country, but to be happy or content you need to see past them.

I'm not passive aggressive, I just dislike people complaining when they should be grateful, you have a job, a roof over your head, in a country with good healthcare and education, the economic outlook is certainly better than many other countries... that probably puts us in the top 1% most fortunate people in the world. Just take a step back and smile, life's too short to spend hours writing about Sweden's housing.

Posted by: pepitoAndalucia 11.May.2019, 08:59 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 11.May.2019, 07:49 PM) *
Regardless of how you wrap it up, where are you happiest? Jobless in Spain, employed in Sweden?


In Sweden you have the money and the job, but life lacks of the fun you can get in Spain.

So, If Spain had the jobs and the salaries sweden has then Spain would be a paradise.
Top healthcare and almost free education we can get that also in Spain too.
In fact our health care system is more efficient than Sweden's.

Jobless in Spain is shitty but that's the biggest problem. While in Sweden the average enjoys of very generous wages but many in private admit being depress.

Let's stop here, we need to keep this thread on topic.


The OP suffers from depression but she doesn't need a job and it seems she doesn't mind buying an apartment in sweden.

1- So for her finding a job is not needed since she has a pension.
2- Since she has money in her pocket she can afford buying so queues for rentals and second hand rentals will not affect her.
3- But there is a problem. She seems to suffer from depression. So given how weather is like in sweden and how social interactions are the OP might have serious issues making it through life in sweden.

So the OP has to consider that even though she might want silence and isolation, her mental condition will worsen due to the environment. Weather and lack of social interaction.

If the OP wants silence I think in my opinion there are many places even in Belgium where can find that silence.

Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 11.May.2019, 11:33 PM

Why do you think the OP is a woman???

Posted by: cootje1976 12.May.2019, 02:30 PM

Now Sweden is a lovely country. When I say 'lovely', I mean the nature, and the countryside. The cities here are, albeit smaller, not really the place you want to be when it comes to living: overpriced (like everywhere), but to make it even worse is the quirkiness of Swedes themselves, they do not tend to talk to strangers at all. Even a smile to someone that you do not know can be seen the wrong way.

Healthcare is so-so, meaning that it might be important to have a good insurance outside of the public healthcare, because in the public system, many people tend to get misdiagnosed (my wife has Crohns, and the medication was not correctly prescribed leading her to have issues etc. the only way that this was sorted was with a second opinion, something that is not done in the public system!), but for minor things it is good. In your case however, you might need to also get the details written out from your current doctor wherever you are, and take that with you when you come here, and make sure it is in english of course..

One other thing to keep in mind; housing is exceptionally hard to find and even if you find something, make sure that it is first hand, and not second hand. The renters market here is dominated by the landlords, and what they want or need goes. I know a colleague that has been living in Sweden for 2 years and works, but moved about 5 times already. So yeah, that is a bust unless you are able to buy something, but even that is now more difficult with the rules on mortgages that have been enforced the past few years... Banks are now very stingy with providing mortgages...

Stay away from unsecured loans in Sweden as much as possible and avoid it as cancer; the interest rates can be high, especially if you just come here, and there is no protection for the consumer if things go sideways; stick with secured lending, and do not overindebt yourself.

Last point is privacy. In Sweden there is none. The moment that you get a personnummer, anyone in the country can obtain your information, and that can be done by anyone, I repeat anyone that has your Swedish ID number, address or anything that can relate to you and they can get it all:
from you as a person, up until your actual financial details all the way down to the nitty gritty (even convictions etc.!). And even though there is a GDPR, there is currently an exclusion in place in Sweden that allows that to continue (for now at least, until the E-privacy act comes into affect since there are no exclusions possible there!). So if you value your privacy, Sweden is NOT for you. Period. If we would have known this at the time of moving here 7 years ago, we would have reconsidered moving elsewhere. However this little fact about Swedish Society is not really 'out' there. By the way the privacy act thing in Sweden is tied to the freedom of the press, which everywhere else are 2 separate things.

We live in Uppsala, and we do plant our own crops, so that should be fine.

In any case, Sweden is awesome in the countryside; nature and the people are friendly and talkative, on the other side people in the major cities (referencing Stockholm) are in general brutes and non approachable, even for something simple as asking for directions.

Take a note that everyone has their own opinion. I have mine and many other might have a different opinion, but the above including the privacy should be taken into consideration if that is important to you. Especially with your disability it is important that you are well informed.


Just my 2 cents!

Posted by: Bsmith 12.May.2019, 05:26 PM

QUOTE (cootje1976 @ 12.May.2019, 01:30 PM) *
In any case, Sweden is awesome in the countryside; nature and the people are friendly and talkative, on the other side people in the major cities (referencing Stockholm) are in general brutes and non approachable, even for something simple as asking for directions.


Our experience living in the countryside was also much nicer than some of the other posters have expressed.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 12.May.2019, 06:02 PM

Oh please... the landscape in all of Sweden is nothing special at all. It’s quite bland. The only reason it’s promoted as being so wonderful is because Sweden is a bland underdeveloped country and has a lot of space with not much going on for it.

But there’s a lot of emptiness ( in more ways than one) so it must be majestic.

From north to south, there are many many many places that are more breathtaking than anything Sweden could EVER offer.

As someone also mentioned, the healthcare is mediocre at best. And who knows if there will be a physician anywhere within a 100km radius that can help you. Don’t know your condition but specialists are few and far between. It’s really a poor system.

If Sweden gave out state funded sandwiches everyday, made of shit, Swedes would tell you they get top quality sandwiches for free... just like their healthcare and education system.

Posted by: skogsbo 12.May.2019, 06:54 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 12.May.2019, 05:02 PM) *
Oh please... the landscape in all of Sweden is nothing special at all. It’s quite bland. The only reason it’s promoted as being so wonderful is because Sweden is a bland underdeveloped country and has a lot of space with not much going on for it.

But there’s a lot of emptiness ( in more ways than one) so it must be majestic.

From north to south, there are many many many places that are more breathtaking than anything Sweden could EVER offer.

As someone also mentioned, the healthcare is mediocre at best. And who knows if there will be a physician anywhere within a 100km radius that can help you. Don’t know your condition but specialists are few and far between. It’s really a poor system.

If Sweden gave out state funded sandwiches everyday, made of shit, Swedes would tell you they get top quality sandwiches for free... just like their healthcare and education system.

I'd suggest you travel a bit more, sarek, koster... no shortage of hidden gems. But the less folk who like them, the quieter it is for everyone else.

Posted by: Bsmith 12.May.2019, 10:51 PM

Sweden has plenty of beautiful landscapes. You want bland, move to Nebraska.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 05:46 AM

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 12.May.2019, 11:51 PM) *
Sweden has plenty of beautiful landscapes. You want bland, move to Nebraska.



Farmland, forest, hills, and some mountains... sounds like Nebraska or Sweden.

And if you talk about coastline... there are plenty of countries with a more varied and breathtaking coastline.

Why do you think swedes push this idea of Lagom... it is how they have to deal with how mediocre their country and people are.

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 09:00 AM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 04:46 AM) *
Why do you think swedes push this idea of Lagom... it is how they have to deal with how mediocre their country and people are.

Actually the cold water coral and glaciated granite of koster or the high coast (isostatic rebound) are relatively unique for most of Europe.

The fact that sweden still experiences distinct seasons makes much of the habit both varied and unique. I swim in the same lakes in summer, that I ski or skate across in winter.

But we are all different and appreciate different things.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 09:23 AM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 10:00 AM) *
Actually the cold water coral and glaciated granite of koster or the high coast (isostatic rebound) are relatively unique for most of Europe.

The fact that sweden still experiences distinct seasons makes much of the habit both varied and unique. I swim in the same lakes in summer, that I ski or skate across in winter.

But we are all different and appreciate different things.



Lol!!! It’s not relatively unique to Northern Europe. Or any other place that has or had glacial movement.

Fact is, there is nothing special about Sweden’s landscape and it is promoted as breathtaking by the Swedish propaganda machine. Another myth.

And you think it’s special that you can skate on the same lake in winter that you swim in in the summer???

Wow. Sweden... the land of simpletons... the land where you give up under the guise of lagom.

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 01:28 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 08:23 AM) *
Lol!!! It’s not relatively unique to Northern Europe. Or any other place that has or had glacial movement.

Fact is, there is nothing special about Sweden’s landscape and it is promoted as breathtaking by the Swedish propaganda machine. Another myth.

And you think it’s special that you can skate on the same lake in winter that you swim in in the summer???

Wow. Sweden... the land of simpletons... the land where you give up under the guise of lagom.

The reality is we like different things... the more people who are like you the quieter the places I enjoy will be, so your loss is my gain.

http://worldheritagesweden.se/en/world-heritages-in-sweden/high-coast/

And actually cold water coral because of very shallow sea depth (1-3m) around Koster isn't common in the northern hemisphere at all.

Glaciers of course are common, but what I was talking about was isostatic rebound on certain types of coast. The devil is in the detail. Especially at a time when most places have the opposite sea level problem.

In all honesty, how many of Sweden's national parks or World heritage sites have you visited?

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 02:45 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 02:28 PM) *
The reality is we like different things... the more people who are like you the quieter the places I enjoy will be, so your loss is my gain.

http://worldheritagesweden.se/en/world-heritages-in-sweden/high-coast/

And actually cold water coral because of very shallow sea depth (1-3m) around Koster isn't common in the northern hemisphere at all.

Glaciers of course are common, but what I was talking about was isostatic rebound on certain types of coast. The devil is in the detail. Especially at a time when most places have the opposite sea level problem.

In all honesty, how many of Sweden's national parks or World heritage sites have you visited?


Different people like different things???? No way.

Oh you mean the coral that has died off in a significant amount and has been replenished by Norwegian coral? So impressive.

Have you been to the Baltic coast where the glacial rebound occurs? It is more a scientific interest rather than visual. Nothing special with how it looks. Nor is glacial rebound unique to that area. Finland has the better looking coastline in that area.

I’ve seen enough whs and national parks in Sweden AND undesignated areas that look the exact same... except the land can still potentially be bought and sold. Some of them aren’t much to look at at all. Some of them you wouldn’t know are world heritage sites. Just another small town. And there are plenty of those is Sweden. I think a better question is how much of the WORLD have you seen?

In all honesty, if you were to take a nature trip at the same latitude that Sweden is, would Sweden be the top of your list? Would you think Sweden has as much a breathtaking landscape as Norway, Iceland, Greenland, Canada, Alaska, Russia?

Have you seen the painted desert? The variety of America’s west coast? Yellowstone or Yosemite? Have you seen the beauty of the fog rolling over the aptly named Smokey mountains? Have you snorkeled in the Caribbean? Have you been anywhere in mexico, India, China? Cruising the countryside in, well, a lot of places is far better than in Sweden.

Just face it. Sweden is a large underpopulated underdeveloped country that is struggling to catch up with reality. They use the emptiness as a selling point. Are you too much a rube to understand that? Because objectively speaking, as I have before, the landscape in Sweden is nothing particularly breathtaking... there is far greater natural beauty in the world.

And to the op... are you even allowed to just move to another eu country and live off disability paid by your home country? Don’t think that’s how the EU works. And as others have said, you will have a more satisfying life elsewhere than Sweden. Why not the French countryside? They are your neighbor... one of them.







Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 03:08 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 01:45 PM) *
question is how much of the WORLD have you seen?

In all honesty, if you were to take a nature trip at the same latitude that Sweden is, would Sweden be the top of your list? Would you think Sweden has as much a breathtaking landscape as Norway, Iceland, Greenland, Canada, Alaska, Russia?

The variety of America’s west coast? Yellowstone or Yosemite? Have

Yes. All of those(if you count Georgia as russia) and many more. I don't know how many countries, maybe 60 or 70. Perhaps more. Most visiting but around 20 in some form of work capacity, so often stayed longer than just week or two etc.. places like nz, Kenya, Peru, Bolivia, South Georgia Chile, various in the middle east, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, probably every country in Europe.
My skill set rests in the natural and environmental sciences, combined with mountaineering etc.. so I've been to some amazing places. However 99.9% of them don't have any medical care or a school for our kids. So I settle for boring sweden where i have climbing, swimming, biking, skiing on the door step and easy access to much more.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 03:38 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 04:08 PM) *
Yes. All of those(if you count Georgia as russia) and many more. I don't know how many countries, maybe 60 or 70. Perhaps more. Most visiting but around 20 in some form of work capacity, so often stayed longer than just week or two etc.. places like nz, Kenya, Peru, Bolivia, South Georgia Chile, various in the middle east, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, probably every country in Europe.
My skill set rests in the natural and environmental sciences, combined with mountaineering etc.. so I've been to some amazing places. However 99.9% of them don't have any medical care or a school for our kids. So I settle for boring sweden where i have climbing, swimming, biking, skiing on the door step and easy access to much more.


Lol!!! You are so full of it... you say 99.9% of places you have worked in don’t have medical care or schools for your kids... yet you say you have worked in almost every country in Europe? I don’t care that you get off on mediocrity, I understand why Sweden is good for you, but your statement of places not having healthcare or schools is ridiculous.

But I get you. Climbing, swimming, biking, hiking, skiing, skating... it’s totally unique to Sweden and you don’t have all that together in one country. Especially not another EU country. Ha!

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 04:21 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 02:38 PM) *
Lol!!! You are so full of it... you say 99.9% of places you have worked in don’t have medical care or schools for your kids... yet you say you have worked in almost every country in Europe? I don’t care that you get off on mediocrity, I understand why Sweden is good for you, but your statement of places not having healthcare or schools is ridiculous.

But I get you. Climbing, swimming, biking, hiking, skiing, skating... it’s totally unique to Sweden and you don’t have all that together in one country. Especially not another EU country. Ha!

I was lucky, I had a paid hobby. I could be on an avalanche course in the Swiss alps one month, then training park rangers on mount Kenya the next. But it's tough on the body and not compatible as a parent. Sweden is a good balance for me at moment.

Maybe I don't want to live in those other countries in Europe and of the countries that I would consider to have the absolute best landscape they aren't in Europe, the alps are nice but way too crowded. Plus life as about balancing things, employment, health, education etc.. I'm only 48, so not fully retired yet, otherwise that might broaden my sphere. We did consider, nz, Canada, Norway.. before moving here. I'm sure all look perfect on the outside but will no doubt just like sweden have their quirks.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 04:27 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 04:08 PM) *
Yes. All of those(if you count Georgia as russia) and many more. I don't know how many countries, maybe 60 or 70. Perhaps more. Most visiting but around 20 in some form of work capacity, so often stayed longer than just week or two etc.. places like nz, Kenya, Peru, Bolivia, South Georgia Chile, various in the middle east, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, probably every country in Europe.
My skill set rests in the natural and environmental sciences, combined with mountaineering etc.. so I've been to some amazing places. However 99.9% of them don't have any medical care or a school for our kids. So I settle for boring sweden where i have climbing, swimming, biking, skiing on the door step and easy access to much more.


Ps...

What is the “yes” in response to? That you think sweden has a more beautiful landscape than the other countries, or pieces of countries, at the same latitude?

And no, Georgia is not part of Russia nor would I ever consider that. It is it’s own independent country free from soviet rule.

Having also been there, you should know as well as I do that they wouldn’t appreciate being called Russian.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 04:40 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 05:21 PM) *
I was lucky, I had a paid hobby. I could be on an avalanche course in the Swiss alps one month, then training park rangers on mount Kenya the next. But it's tough on the body and not compatible as a parent. Sweden is a good balance for me at moment.

Maybe I don't want to live in those other countries in Europe and of the countries that I would consider to have the absolute best landscape they aren't in Europe, the alps are nice but way too crowded. Plus life as about balancing things, employment, health, education etc.. I'm only 48, so not fully retired yet, otherwise that might broaden my sphere. We did consider, nz, Canada, Norway.. before moving here. I'm sure all look perfect on the outside but will no doubt just like sweden have their quirks.


Not as many quirks as Swedes have. Almost all countries are more upfront.

But I understand your decisions for the family reasons. Did you have kids once settled in Sweden? Or do you travel as much for work? Or are you just working at a university now. Otherwise... for someone who loves nature and admittedly, finally, can say that there is much MORE beauty outside of Sweden, don’t you get a bit stir crazy?


Still, you settled. Lagom. Why go for something great?

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 04:44 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 03:27 PM) *
Ps...

What is the “yes” in response to? That you think sweden has a more beautiful landscape than the other countries, or pieces of countries, at the same latitude?

And no, Georgia is not part of Russia nor would I ever consider that. It is it’s own independent country free from soviet rule.

Having also been there, you should know as well as I do that they wouldn’t appreciate being called Russian.

Yes. I have been to those countries you listed.

And yes I would agree with you it's not Russia. Putin might say otherwise. I could claim a Russia visit on a technicality but I'm not sure just going up elbrus, qualifies as really seeing a nation!!

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 05:02 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 03:40 PM) *
Not as many quirks as Swedes have. Almost all countries are more upfront.

But I understand your decisions for the family reasons. Did you have kids once settled in Sweden? Or do you travel as much for work? Or are you just working at a university now. Otherwise... for someone who loves nature and admittedly, finally, can say that there is much MORE beauty outside of Sweden, don’t you get a bit stir crazy?


Still, you settled. Lagom. Why go for something great?

The kids were 2 and 4 when we came. If we'd stayed in the UK they would have to start school there, a postcode lottery, uniforms and too much religion for my liking. I was scaling down my travel a little, as when you miss your first child's first birthday because you are thousands of miles away it's not great and it wasn't the kind of upbringing
I wanted them to have. Sweden has a pretty good work to life balance.

University.. no chance, that would send me crazy. More of a lateral shift. Now an owner of a small farm and forest, which has a lot of protected land, so correlates a little with my academic side. The physical side is solved by being self employed and apart from a few critical jobs if I feel like just going off biking, cycling, kayaking for a day it's never a problem.

The one thing you must admit that most of sweden wins at when visiting places is the lack of litter. The UK is just an embarrassment on this front, not that I would want to use the UK as a benchmark for anything.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 05:35 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 06:02 PM) *
The kids were 2 and 4 when we came. If we'd stayed in the UK they would have to start school there, a postcode lottery, uniforms and too much religion for my liking. I was scaling down my travel a little, as when you miss your first child's first birthday because you are thousands of miles away it's not great and it wasn't the kind of upbringing
I wanted them to have. Sweden has a pretty good work to life balance.

University.. no chance, that would send me crazy. More of a lateral shift. Now an owner of a small farm and forest, which has a lot of protected land, so correlates a little with my academic side. The physical side is solved by being self employed and apart from a few critical jobs if I feel like just going off biking, cycling, kayaking for a day it's never a problem.

The one thing you must admit that most of sweden wins at when visiting places is the lack of litter. The UK is just an embarrassment on this front, not that I would want to use the UK as a benchmark for anything.


I’d maybe use the UK as a benchmark for colonialism and tea sales. Their shortbread biscuits are also delicious. The UK landscape is also beautiful... Ireland Scotland and Wales. English country side is nice as well.



“The one thing you must admit that most of sweden wins at when visiting places is the lack of litter.“ I don’t know what you mean so I can’t admit anything.

Is your wife Swedish? How were you able to move here as a self employed person without any proven income... it was a career/ life change moving here. Maybe you moved a while ago when things weren’t so ridiculous.

Either way, sounds like a good choice for you. It would be awful having to be away from kids like you mentioned... with not much control of when you need to travel.

Back to the op, and because you’re a farmer skogs... doesn’t it seem odd that someone with a severe enough disability to have them on disability checks for the rest of their life and as their main income would want to be a farmer? If it’s a physical disability... well, farming is physical work. If it’s a mental disability... isolating themselves wouldn’t be a good idea either.




Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 13.May.2019, 05:35 PM

A+ on the litter scene as I am in the Big Apple as a comparison...

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 06:08 PM

Say what,
I'd worked for long enough and in between the odd extravagance saved some cash, made a few investments and we rent out our old house too. That was 2011, they might well be harsher now.

The op.. sometimes people like that could be more suited to lone working, self employed etc. As they don't need to conform to work place culture and timings. Provided though they have the skills or means to afford a flexible lifestyle.

My brothers wife is bi polar and at times he is more live in carer than husband, she's never lived on her own. (I think he was well duped but that's another story).

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 06:56 PM

Aha... I see now. No, I would not admit there is much less litter because there is plenty of litter around the cities and surrounding areas, including green areas. There are snus packets and cigarette butts everywhere, plastic, paper, whatever usual litter... it’s there in Sweden as well.

Maybe it’s even more sad considering cleanliness is another Swedish promotion. Sure in sparsely populated areas there is less litter, like anywhere else, and maybe since you live in a rural area you don’t experience it. But in the forests around the cities I have found plastic, spray cans, car parts, broken bikes, discarded furniture, etc etc.

Don’t know how long you’ve been in Sweden but ask anyone who has been in Gothenburg how “litter free” it was after the weekends. The city was like a garbage dump especially Avenyn. I’m talking early 2000’s maybe later.. there was an initiative to combat the rampant littering. And by no means is Sweden on a path for less litter, nor would I ever describe Sweden as abundantly clean. Again, it’s about the emptiness that they promote as a clean and beautiful landscape.

And no kidding there is more litter in nyc... there are more people in that metropolitan area than there are in all of Sweden... and in a fraction of the space.

Think of it as nostalgia, Gamla, to the good old days of the garbage strikes in, what, the late 60’s early 70’s.

So yeah, Swedish towns and cities are not as clean as the myth would have you believe. The countryside is clean... but what countrysides aren’t?

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 13.May.2019, 07:15 PM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 13.May.2019, 07:08 PM) *
Say what,
I'd worked for long enough and in between the odd extravagance saved some cash, made a few investments and we rent out our old house too. That was 2011, they might well be harsher now.

The op.. sometimes people like that could be more suited to lone working, self employed etc. As they don't need to conform to work place culture and timings. Provided though they have the skills or means to afford a flexible lifestyle.

My brothers wife is bi polar and at times he is more live in carer than husband, she's never lived on her own. (I think he was well duped but that's another story).


Yea, I believe there are much greater hurdles to prove financial stability, especially without a job offer/ contract, nowadays.

Sorry about your brother. Seems like you think highly of your sister in law though. Must make for interesting family gatherings. wink.gif

That goes to my point though that someone with a severe enough impairment or mental disability that qualifies them for lifetime disability checks would probably need some consistent care and NOT isolate themselves. Same with a physical disability.

Moving to the Swedish countryside alone as a foreigner with a disability sounds like a horrible idea.

Op, if you’ll grace us with your presence... do you mind saying what disability you have? Maybe you are just a little bummed out now and thinking how great it would be to move. Maybe in a week or two you will love your Belgian life, then in a few weeks later hate it again... and the cycle continues.

Posted by: skogsbo 13.May.2019, 08:15 PM

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 13.May.2019, 06:15 PM) *
Sorry about your brother. Seems like you think highly of your sister in law though. Must make for interesting family gatherings. wink.gif

She's a nice enough person, she was a 30 something still living at home when she met my brother, when she had an episode she tried to make out it was the first time it had ever happened and didn't know what it was; despite already having a prescription. My brother beloved every word of it of course and the rest is history.

Posted by: Bsmith 13.May.2019, 09:52 PM

The OP gave me the impression that he/she had on a pair of rose colored glasses on when he/she planned on Sweden. Not that Sweden is a terrible place by any means but it is not for everyone and there are plenty of posters on this forum that will be more than glad to explain Sweden's shortcomings.

Not knowing what the OP's actually disability I can't say for sure but he/she did mention something about depression and with the lack of sunshine in the winter, I would think twice about moving to Sweden with that problem.

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 14.May.2019, 07:36 AM

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 13.May.2019, 10:52 PM) *
The OP gave me the impression that he/she had on a pair of rose colored glasses on when he/she planned on Sweden. Not that Sweden is a terrible place by any means but it is not for everyone and there are plenty of posters on this forum that will be more than glad to explain Sweden's shortcomings.

Not knowing what the OP's actually disability I can't say for sure but he/she did mention something about depression and with the lack of sunshine in the winter, I would think twice about moving to Sweden with that problem.


Regardless of the darkness, but an important point, one should not isolate themselves if depression is a symptom of their disability that has them on govt checks for life.

Maybe move to the Netherlands, another neighbor, where they have nice countryside and you can grow cannabis and maybe get some help with non pharmaceutical treatment of your disability.

The op is, no offense at all, probably in a depressive episode and thinking that everything would be better if they just got out of where they are now.... but op, your depression will follow... and you don’t want to be alone in a cold dark country with unfriendly, odd, reserved people. There are so many people in that country, cities especially, that look like they are on the verge of losing it.

Everyone talks about the darkness being depressing but they get the midnight sun in the summer so it is ok. I think that is bs. There is nothing fun about the sun being up that late. Swedes think it is great because they don’t know any better and anything Swedish to a Swede is the absolute best.

Anyone else feel the same way about the over glorified midnight sun?


Posted by: skogsbo 14.May.2019, 01:38 PM

Doesn't really matter if it's light or not, folk should be sleeping!

Posted by: Saywhatwhat 15.May.2019, 07:57 AM

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 14.May.2019, 02:38 PM) *
Doesn't really matter if it's light or not, folk should be sleeping!


Ha! Truth!

Don’t animals get a little messed up from it? Aren’t humans animals?

I personally enjoy a summer night more when it is dark around 21 21:30. And especially when I was younger. Nobody likes coming out of a club or party when it’s light out.

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