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Moving to Sweden with a disability

From within the EU

Bsmith
post 9.May.2019, 12:27 PM
Post #16
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

QUOTE (pepitoAndalucia @ 8.May.2019, 09:46 PM) *
I live in Sweden because in my country there is no work.



So instead of staying in the country you love and acting as an agent for change, you choose to run away to Sweden. Fine. Looking out for #1 and all that jazz, but don't continue to bemoan how piss poor everything in Sweden is. No one asked you to move there.
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pepitoAndalucia
post 9.May.2019, 06:24 PM
Post #17
Joined: 3.Jun.2018

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 9.May.2019, 01:27 PM) *
So instead of staying in the country you love and acting as an agent for change, you choose to run away to Sweden. Fine. Looking out for #1 and all that jazz, but don't ... (show full quote)



We do what we can in order to pay the rent every month.

QUOTE
I live in Sweden because in my country there is no work.
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Bsmith
post 9.May.2019, 07:23 PM
Post #18
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Do you send money back? If not, you are not helping your beloved country and things will never get better.

Meanwhile, you are stuck someplace where you are obviously miserable in order to survive.

Just saying...
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skogsbo
post 9.May.2019, 09:24 PM
Post #19
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (pepitoAndalucia @ 9.May.2019, 05:24 PM) *
We do what we can in order to pay the rent every month.

Iinteresting position, you criticise the country that feeds you and praise one that can't!!
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Bsmith
post 10.May.2019, 11:15 AM
Post #20
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

I understand how tough it can be moving to a new country. You have to learn a new language, new customs, new laws...everything is different. I remember the first time I pulled up to a gas pump in Sweden and it took me 5 minutes to figure out how to use the damn thing, a task that I had performed thousands of time at home without a second thought. The whole ordeal of living in a new land is immensely stressful.

And I also get how nostalgia for home and family and friends kicks in and makes you long for your old home place.

But you either make peace with it, or you will be miserable. Or you move back. Those are really the only choices.
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pepitoAndalucia
post 11.May.2019, 03:45 PM
Post #21
Joined: 3.Jun.2018

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 9.May.2019, 10:24 PM) *
Iinteresting position, you criticise the country that feeds you and praise one that can't!!


Wrong, they don't feed me. I feed myself with my effort.

No sweden is not a paradise it's very well designed trap.

Spain cannot offer me a job, but Spain is not a trap. Spain doesn't have queues for rentals, Spain doesn't have massive ghettos as Sweden has. Spain doesn't use their language to filter as you swedes do.

So please, stop the passive aggression, I have seen it for a long time. I know you all have money and no life but please don't bitch when the only thing of value you have is high wages and a secured job.
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pepitoAndalucia
post 11.May.2019, 03:58 PM
Post #22
Joined: 3.Jun.2018

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 10.May.2019, 12:15 PM) *
I understand how tough it can be moving to a new country. You have to learn a new language, new customs, new laws...everything is different. I remember the first time I pull ... (show full quote)


I am not miserable, actually I have met swedes who take antidepressants despite they have good salaries and job security.

I do work out 4 times a week, I try to have fun with my limited resources, weather doesn't affect me at all, passive aggressive people like you doesn't even touch my skin. For what I have seen around me, I am quite happy.

I know here in scandinavian, passive aggression and passive bullying is common. I know that since violence is not seen as something acceptable you all jump like snakes to make passive aggressive comments about others.

I must tell you, I am a survivor in sweden, I have managed to live here despite all the odds, despite the jokes about my culture, despite the well hidden segregation, despite your insults. I managed, I am not miserable.

Met many swedes who confess they are miserable. They have secured jobs, a car, a house, family, money in their pockets to travel anywhere. And despite that, they are miserable.

I have little money, no car, no secured job, no fixed apartment but despite it I am not miserable. I cannot be beaten by weather, or passive agressive people like you and your friends in this forum because most likely I am stronger than you.

Neither the weather or the scandinavian passive aggression and passive bullying can beat me, because most likely I am stronger than the average including you and your sneaky friends.

I know many are affected by the weather, I am not. Most likely you are. Most likely I am stronger than you.

What amazes me is this thread started as something to share and you and your sneaky friends are coming here to insult me with passive aggressive comments.

Miserable me?. No way, MISERABLE YOU!.
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Bsmith
post 11.May.2019, 06:34 PM
Post #23
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Sorry, your constant complaints and insults hurled at every imaginable aspect of life in Sweden led me to believe that you were a miserable wretch. I had no idea that you were such a happy, sunshiney, optimistic person. Life of the party, never complains, always helpful and courteous. Yes, a regular fount of joy. Miscellaneous people seek you out as inspiration on how to navigate through the difficulties of life with a calm and graceful demeanor. A veritable guru of happiness.

Oh, and am not passive aggressive at all. When I need to get aggressive, I get right after it.
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skogsbo
post 11.May.2019, 06:49 PM
Post #24
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Regardless of how you wrap it up, where are you happiest? Jobless in Spain, employed in Sweden?

Absolutely no where is perfect we can find faults in any country, but to be happy or content you need to see past them.

I'm not passive aggressive, I just dislike people complaining when they should be grateful, you have a job, a roof over your head, in a country with good healthcare and education, the economic outlook is certainly better than many other countries... that probably puts us in the top 1% most fortunate people in the world. Just take a step back and smile, life's too short to spend hours writing about Sweden's housing.
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pepitoAndalucia
post 11.May.2019, 08:59 PM
Post #25
Joined: 3.Jun.2018

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 11.May.2019, 07:49 PM) *
Regardless of how you wrap it up, where are you happiest? Jobless in Spain, employed in Sweden?


In Sweden you have the money and the job, but life lacks of the fun you can get in Spain.

So, If Spain had the jobs and the salaries sweden has then Spain would be a paradise.
Top healthcare and almost free education we can get that also in Spain too.
In fact our health care system is more efficient than Sweden's.

Jobless in Spain is shitty but that's the biggest problem. While in Sweden the average enjoys of very generous wages but many in private admit being depress.

Let's stop here, we need to keep this thread on topic.


The OP suffers from depression but she doesn't need a job and it seems she doesn't mind buying an apartment in sweden.

1- So for her finding a job is not needed since she has a pension.
2- Since she has money in her pocket she can afford buying so queues for rentals and second hand rentals will not affect her.
3- But there is a problem. She seems to suffer from depression. So given how weather is like in sweden and how social interactions are the OP might have serious issues making it through life in sweden.

So the OP has to consider that even though she might want silence and isolation, her mental condition will worsen due to the environment. Weather and lack of social interaction.

If the OP wants silence I think in my opinion there are many places even in Belgium where can find that silence.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 11.May.2019, 11:33 PM
Post #26
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

Why do you think the OP is a woman???
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cootje1976
post 12.May.2019, 02:30 PM
Post #27
Location: Uppsala county
Joined: 3.May.2012

Now Sweden is a lovely country. When I say 'lovely', I mean the nature, and the countryside. The cities here are, albeit smaller, not really the place you want to be when it comes to living: overpriced (like everywhere), but to make it even worse is the quirkiness of Swedes themselves, they do not tend to talk to strangers at all. Even a smile to someone that you do not know can be seen the wrong way.

Healthcare is so-so, meaning that it might be important to have a good insurance outside of the public healthcare, because in the public system, many people tend to get misdiagnosed (my wife has Crohns, and the medication was not correctly prescribed leading her to have issues etc. the only way that this was sorted was with a second opinion, something that is not done in the public system!), but for minor things it is good. In your case however, you might need to also get the details written out from your current doctor wherever you are, and take that with you when you come here, and make sure it is in english of course..

One other thing to keep in mind; housing is exceptionally hard to find and even if you find something, make sure that it is first hand, and not second hand. The renters market here is dominated by the landlords, and what they want or need goes. I know a colleague that has been living in Sweden for 2 years and works, but moved about 5 times already. So yeah, that is a bust unless you are able to buy something, but even that is now more difficult with the rules on mortgages that have been enforced the past few years... Banks are now very stingy with providing mortgages...

Stay away from unsecured loans in Sweden as much as possible and avoid it as cancer; the interest rates can be high, especially if you just come here, and there is no protection for the consumer if things go sideways; stick with secured lending, and do not overindebt yourself.

Last point is privacy. In Sweden there is none. The moment that you get a personnummer, anyone in the country can obtain your information, and that can be done by anyone, I repeat anyone that has your Swedish ID number, address or anything that can relate to you and they can get it all:
from you as a person, up until your actual financial details all the way down to the nitty gritty (even convictions etc.!). And even though there is a GDPR, there is currently an exclusion in place in Sweden that allows that to continue (for now at least, until the E-privacy act comes into affect since there are no exclusions possible there!). So if you value your privacy, Sweden is NOT for you. Period. If we would have known this at the time of moving here 7 years ago, we would have reconsidered moving elsewhere. However this little fact about Swedish Society is not really 'out' there. By the way the privacy act thing in Sweden is tied to the freedom of the press, which everywhere else are 2 separate things.

We live in Uppsala, and we do plant our own crops, so that should be fine.

In any case, Sweden is awesome in the countryside; nature and the people are friendly and talkative, on the other side people in the major cities (referencing Stockholm) are in general brutes and non approachable, even for something simple as asking for directions.

Take a note that everyone has their own opinion. I have mine and many other might have a different opinion, but the above including the privacy should be taken into consideration if that is important to you. Especially with your disability it is important that you are well informed.


Just my 2 cents!
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Bsmith
post 12.May.2019, 05:26 PM
Post #28
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

QUOTE (cootje1976 @ 12.May.2019, 01:30 PM) *
In any case, Sweden is awesome in the countryside; nature and the people are friendly and talkative, on the other side people in the major cities (referencing Stockholm) are i ... (show full quote)


Our experience living in the countryside was also much nicer than some of the other posters have expressed.
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Saywhatwhat
post 12.May.2019, 06:02 PM
Post #29
Joined: 15.Feb.2018

Oh please... the landscape in all of Sweden is nothing special at all. It’s quite bland. The only reason it’s promoted as being so wonderful is because Sweden is a bland underdeveloped country and has a lot of space with not much going on for it.

But there’s a lot of emptiness ( in more ways than one) so it must be majestic.

From north to south, there are many many many places that are more breathtaking than anything Sweden could EVER offer.

As someone also mentioned, the healthcare is mediocre at best. And who knows if there will be a physician anywhere within a 100km radius that can help you. Don’t know your condition but specialists are few and far between. It’s really a poor system.

If Sweden gave out state funded sandwiches everyday, made of shit, Swedes would tell you they get top quality sandwiches for free... just like their healthcare and education system.
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skogsbo
post 12.May.2019, 06:54 PM
Post #30
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 12.May.2019, 05:02 PM) *
Oh please... the landscape in all of Sweden is nothing special at all. It’s quite bland. The only reason it’s promoted as being so wonderful is because Sweden is a bland u ... (show full quote)

I'd suggest you travel a bit more, sarek, koster... no shortage of hidden gems. But the less folk who like them, the quieter it is for everyone else.
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