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To get or not to get Swedish citizenship

I'm ambivalent about it

Gamla Hälsingebock
post 10.Mar.2012, 10:41 PM
Post #16
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

I have "heard" that the US is sometimes reluctant to help out dual citizenship people...on the basis of... hey we aren't good enough for you...why should we help you now...kind of thing.

I cannot document it but somehow I remember a problem case...I don't think it's policy...do I?

But I can see it happening under some circumstances.

Any comments?
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rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 02:34 AM
Post #17
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

If you are a dual citizen, one of your countries will not provide you with assistance at all in sorting out issues with the other. I do not think the US is less likely to help you out if you are a US-Swedish citizen and run into trouble in Asia, though, for example.
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Miss Kitten
post 11.Mar.2012, 09:44 AM
Post #18
Location: Kronoberg
Joined: 20.Aug.2007

This was my understanding of the implications of dual citizenship as well. One of your countries of citizenship will not shelter you from the other should you get in some kind of trouble in it.

It would be interesting to see if there are indeed any cases, as GH indicated, of the US refusing to help one of it's citizens (now a dual citizen) out of sheer spite.
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*Guest*
post 11.Mar.2012, 10:15 AM
Post #19


I don't think that there is any doubt that the INS takes a dim view if you are not a gung-ho American.

While I do not have dual citizenship, being a long-time exile from the States, I have always had trouble until the last time I went there, with the INS agent wanting to know why I would want to live in Portugal and now Sweden as a resident, why I took such a circuitous route coming there, where and with whom I was staying, what was the purpose of my visit, etc. ad nauseam.

I certainly got the idea that the agents didn't like my doings one bit. Suspect if I had dual citizenship, I would have been sent straight back to the other place.

Just think of all the hostile searches and assorted crap that visitors have been through when they come to the States. They are certainly even worse than what citizens have to put up with.

Oh, and the last time I visited the States the INS agent was surprisingly friendly and just curious. In the line before me, the people were being questioned extensively - like what I had previously experienced - and I thought, oh, I'm going to get the third degree in the back roóm this time.

This time, though, the agent was only curious about my first name - where it came from, what it might mean, etc.

It was only when I got back here, and discovered that Gwrhyr aka Colleen LaRose was still trying to entrap me, the house had been broken into to find material that I was some kind of foreign agent or was dealing with her in helping assassinate that screwball cartoonist Lars Vilks.

Then later I learned that the only reason that the INS was so willing to let me in was because the CIA, since Säpo had stopped its attempts to kill me the previous February, was hoping to set me up as a spy when I was in California, near the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and chief nuclear spy catcher Thomas Reed.

Hardly a friendly, non-paranoid place.
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Miss Kitten
post 11.Mar.2012, 10:24 AM
Post #20
Location: Kronoberg
Joined: 20.Aug.2007

Wow, that's one hell of a story, Trowbridge. Have you ever considered getting Swedish citizenship and giving up your US citizenship? Or would that make things worse?

Lately I've been reading about Americans living in Sweden who have actually gone as far as giving up their American citizenship just so they don't have to cope with the draconian double taxation polices of the United States.
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*Guest*
post 11.Mar.2012, 10:48 AM
Post #21


Yes; Miss Kitten, I have thought about getting Swedish citizenship but have decided against it for various reasons.

First, being who I am, and what I do, I don't not want to put any more problems upon the Swedish government, as I am sure that it already has more than it wants with me.

And I would would lose my limited SS for even less from Sweden, I think. Besides, there are not only the problems you mention about enforcing forgotten bits from the US tax code. I am sure that it is only a matter of time before Washington declares that foreign citizens lose whatever SS they amassed in the States.

When I was a resident of Portugal, the Clinton administration was most desirous to stop Portuguese citizens, who had gone to the States to work, and had amassed reasonable SS benefits, who had returned home getting them.

While I don't want to sound myself too paranoid, one of the tradeoffs that the CIA - with the help of Clinton's White House, especially Chief of Staff Leon Panetta and now SoD - had to give in order to get the Portuguese foreign intelligence service to help out in killing me was that SS benefits for Portuguese returning home would continue.

For this, the American Ambassador in Lisbon at the time, Elizabeth Frawley Bagley, was given the highest honor by the Portuguese government under Mario Soares because she had made the necessary arrangements, especially my poisoning.

A further reason not to change my citizenship is that it would just make me more removed from my extended family still in the States who already, like the Swedish government, have as much as it can handle. smile.gif
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gplusa
post 11.Mar.2012, 11:20 AM
Post #22
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

As a non-EU, it's much less hassle being able to wander around Europe without having to explain a Residency sticker to the check in guy at Budapest airport. Having a Swedish passport is just one less thing to worry about. It also sits in the back of my mind that "only Swedish citizens have the absolute right to live in Sweden". The absolute right. No matter what changes may occur in the future between country or continental agreements, I'll always have the right to live here. Most likely never be an issue, but for a few kronor I never have to lose sleep over it.

From an internal aspect, citizenship does offer more rights, EU status or not. As a citizen I can work on defence projects (which I have previously been unable to do) as well as projects of significant importance to Sweden. I'm now able to work on design projects in the heart of the mining industry which I hadn't been eligible to work on prior to receiving citizenship.

For me, citizenship was about giving me back the freedom to choose, rather than having choices limited for me. And I still have my NZ passport to avoid the traffic jam queue at Australian airports.
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aino
post 11.Mar.2012, 11:27 AM
Post #23
Joined: 14.Jan.2010

I am a US citizen who got Swedish citizenship last year. As a person whose family immigrated to US a long time ago, I know how important it is to put emotions aside and think about it logically. I think there's a fair bit of upside to Swedish citizenship:
  • You can work anywhere in EU, without having to file more paperwork. You may think now that won't ever happen, but who knows what will happen in the next decade or two?
  • You can go to countries were Americans are disliked using your Swedish passport
  • If you have children, you give them more choice down the road
  • You already have to file Swedish taxes, so it doesn't affect you tax-wise, but if you move out of Sweden, you don't have to pay Swedish taxes as long as you're taxed elsewhere

And last but not least, the process of applying is online and trivial.
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JulieLou40
post 11.Mar.2012, 11:30 AM
Post #24
Location: Luleå
Joined: 19.Oct.2009

QUOTE (gplusa @ 11.Mar.2012, 11:20 AM) *
As a non-EU, it's much less hassle being able to wander around Europe without having to explain a Residency sticker to the check in guy at Budapest airport. Having a Swedi ... (show full quote)

Nice one, think you've summed up my reasons there too (apart from the EU bit, obviously, saying as I'm already EU). There's always talk in the UK about people rebelling and trying to make the UK leave the EU-in which case my son and I would most likely be in the you-know-what. If we go down the citizenship route eventually, worry about ever getting kicked out will be completely avoided.
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Puffin
post 11.Mar.2012, 01:28 PM
Post #25
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Citizenship is something that I have been thinking about as I have lived here for over 15 years now and Mr Puffin and the Puffinettes have now become Swedish citizens

However I have been a little concerned about the long waits - I'm not sure that I can be without my passport for several months as I use it for work and also my mother in the UK is 81...

So unsure what to do mellow.gif
mellow.gif
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rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 01:32 PM
Post #26
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

Are you forbidden from leaving/entering Sweden during this time, as well? I don't know where you are originally from, Puffin, but it is possible to get a second passport from both the US and UK, and perhaps other countries, for the purpose of being able to travel whilst waiting on a visa application that requires you to submit your passport.

In the UK, however, they not only hold your passport but require you remain *in the UK* whilst you have an application pending at the Border Agency. If Migrationsverket is okay with you leaving/entering on a second passport, though, it should be doable =)

EDIT: Also, I would assume, given the length of your time in Sweden, that you would be on the shorter side of approval. I don't know how far back Migrationsverket go in their searches, but since your identity is so strongly establish in Sweden, it couldn't be that long...
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gplusa
post 11.Mar.2012, 01:50 PM
Post #27
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

Puffin, my citizenship application took 4 weeks. To the day. So that's how long I was without a passport. You take the gamble. That being said, if you need to travel out of Sweden during the processing time, you can get your original passport back from Migrationsverket within 48 hours. Without losing your place in the processing queue. At least, that's what they told me when I asked.Once I had my citizenship letter, it took 2 days to apply for and receive a Swedish passport.
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JulieLou40
post 11.Mar.2012, 01:51 PM
Post #28
Location: Luleå
Joined: 19.Oct.2009

QUOTE (Trowbridge H. Ford @ 11.Mar.2012, 10:15 AM) *
It was only when I got back here, and discovered that Gwrhyr aka Colleen LaRose was still trying to entrap me, the house had been broken into to find material that I was some ... (show full quote)

I have yet to understand one of trowbridge's posts.
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rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 01:53 PM
Post #29
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

Best to just ignore them.

Despite being pro-Scandinavian here, even we should not feed trolls wink.gif
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Abe L
post 11.Mar.2012, 02:04 PM
Post #30
Joined: 20.Jul.2011

It's always a good idea to use the opportunity to get additional citizenships as there will always be some point in life where it comes in convenient. Holding 3 citizenships, I've never had it work against me, even though some countries seem to be cracking down on it.

Especially for frequent travelers it's generally a good idea to separate visiting certain areas over different passports. You might not want to cross the US border with a stamp from Iran in your passport and vice versa. The less conclusions you let border folks draw from things in your passport the better. It's also easier lately to travel around South-America with an European passport.

Later on it can also pay off if you can hand them down to your offspring, potentially making moving around and living in certain countries easier. Having a US citizenship handed down to you is far more convenient then the green card battle.

Most importantly, do never give up a citizenship! Only assume new ones and do proper research on what it takes to maintain both. Keep in mind that some citizenships can not be 'given up' while some require you to give up any others. However, virtually every country has rules that under certain circumstances allow you to have multiple citizenships.
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