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Studded tires in winter

Are they required in the North?

mångk
post 22.Aug.2011, 04:54 PM
Post #16
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 22.Aug.2011, 05:32 PM) *
But if you want to remain a dinosaur and drive your 4WD Chelsea tractor through the city, ripping up the roads which MY taxes will be used to repair...


That coming from a guy who still has someone walking in front of his t-model with a flag! laugh.gif

The problem is not so much the snow but the ice. Even if the roads are sanded/salted you still end up with ice when the temp falls below a certain level.

I have seen too many people have problems with modern cars with ABS and unstudded tires in the city. I have almost been cleaned up too many times crossing the road at the zebra crossings because of it. They think that with ABS they won't lose traction. Sad thing is when they hit ice and try to brake they do. That is in Stockholm!

If you are concerned about the environment and your taxes take a bus or a train! I do. biggrin.gif
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summo
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:01 PM
Post #17
Joined: 9.Jan.2010

QUOTE (teslar @ 22.Aug.2011, 02:35 PM) *
I'm not getting into the studded/stud-free discussion again but both of the above are simply wrong.

Teslar, I was generalising somewhat, winter tyres mean different things to different folk, but either way Skane summer tyres are not appropriate or legal for a winter up north.

It really does depend on were you are, i've used studded, winter and even have chains (or tracks really), as rule it's studded for the 15km to kids dagis / shops etc.. it does get cleared , rarely sees sand and never salt, so don't worry I'm not wasting yours or my taxes on trashing roads.

I argee on snow , with un-studded winter tyres you can get through harsh driving conditions, especially if its a narrow rimmed, front wheel drive car and low torque engine ( i prefer diesel). I regularly drove up 500 / 600m to weardale ski club on these, when poor 4x4 drivers were reaching for their chains.

At least this is the tyre debate done 2 months early!
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Rick Methven
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:01 PM
Post #18
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

QUOTE (mångk @ 22.Aug.2011, 05:54 PM) *
That coming from a guy who still has someone walking in front of his t-model with a flag! The problem is not so much the snow but the ice. Even if the roads are sanded/sa ... (show full quote)

Not ABS, anything made in the last 15 years has ABS, but ESP the combination of anti-skid and traction control. read the Vägverket paper that I posted the link to.

Last winter my son was run into by a car with studded tyres at a junction because he could not stop in time.

PS Model T laugh.gif

I drive a SAAB 9-5 Aero Nordic chipped to 270bhp. I am also a member of the Institute of advanced motorists and have been driving on snow roads for 50 years and never had any accident
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summo
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:10 PM
Post #19
Joined: 9.Jan.2010

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 22.Aug.2011, 04:01 PM) *
Last winter my son was run into by a car with studded tyres at a junction because he could not stop in time.

Thats bad for him, but i presume you have evidence to show that all cars on un-studded winter tyres have always stopped on time? wink.gif

Driver ability & awareness has far more to do with it, as an IAM member you should know that, all that roadcraft stuff.
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mångk
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:13 PM
Post #20
Joined: 27.Jul.2008

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 22.Aug.2011, 06:01 PM) *
Not ABS, anything made in the last 15 years has ABS, but ESP the combination of anti-skid and traction control. read the Vägverket paper that I posted the link to. Last win ... (show full quote)


I think it was ESP that stopped me from being cleaned up the last time, mine and not the cars! smile.gif

Perhaps its sometimes the driver and not the equipment. Hope there was no serious or permanent damage to your son!
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gplusa
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:22 PM
Post #21
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

After a couple of winters here I thought I had become the master of snow and ice driving. Until I switched off the DSTC on the Volvo and realised exactly how much it was helping me under acceleration and cornering. I've never dared switch it off again.
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edd1
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:26 PM
Post #22
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 27.Mar.2008

here's a little test (in Swedish) to see whats best depending on where you live etc!

http://www.teknikensvarld.se/flash/micheli...michelin_TV.swf
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jamesblish
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:26 PM
Post #23
Joined: 26.Apr.2011

Problem is you can't buy tyres based on this-or-that weather, you've got to have tyres that'll work even on unplowed roads etc. Because you WILL encounter those. It's a bit like wearing a life vest in a boat. You won't need it most of the time but when you do, you'll be really glad you had it. And I ask again: what is to be gained from _not_ having studs?
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gplusa
post 22.Aug.2011, 05:30 PM
Post #24
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

As someone here commented a couple of winters back: "I'll stop fitting studded tyres on my car when the police stop fitting them on their cars"
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Rick Methven
post 23.Aug.2011, 06:09 AM
Post #25
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

The problem is that people believe the hype that they are 'safe' if they have studs and think that they can continue to drive as if on summer tyres on a dry road. Its OK the studs will dig in and stop me... Oops!

I grew up driving rear wheel drive cars with no ABS/ESP or winter tyres, in the Mountains of North Wales and we had snow from November to March. The roads where ploughed, when I got on the tractor to do the ploughing. It was normal to stick a sack of sand in the boot to help the tyres get grip, and to spread under the wheels on slippery hills, the rest was entirely up to the driver. From November on in Sweden, I have a snow shovel, a bag of sand and some bark and a tow rope, in the boot at all times along with a warm blanket.
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summo
post 23.Aug.2011, 07:52 AM
Post #26
Joined: 9.Jan.2010

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 23.Aug.2011, 05:09 AM) *
It was normal to stick a sack of sand in the boot to help the tyres get grip, and to spread under the wheels on slippery hills, the rest was entirely up to the driver. From No ... (show full quote)

I argee, long ago my dad worked for an engineering company, so we used to use 2 bags of lead pellets over the top of each rear axle in the boot of the cortina. I grew up in weardale, so winter kit in the car was the norm, although foot mats and tow rope also helped aid our traction at times.
Keeping the fuel above half way does no harm either, if it all goes really wrong!
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gplusa
post 23.Aug.2011, 08:25 AM
Post #27
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

I had a Valiant Pacer (to those teary eyed Aussies out there) which needed half a dozen concrete blocks in the boot whether it was summer or winter, just to go around corners. I think you could order them as a factory option.
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summo
post 23.Aug.2011, 08:31 AM
Post #28
Joined: 9.Jan.2010

there we many UK car like that too, back end just floated around unless you had some folk sitting in the back.

An axe for tree branches are probably the low cost traction alternative, if stuck with your summer skane tyres! Tricky to throw out the window when you need to stop though.
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