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Intensive Swedish Lessons in Stockholm

Puffin
post 31.Jul.2008, 08:47 AM
Post #16
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Sorry was verbally abusing a poorly paid fast food employee who was trying to help out a customer who she thought didn't speak Swedish supoosed to be funny?

Or am I missing the humour of the situation?
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*Sweat Loaf*
post 31.Jul.2008, 09:07 AM
Post #17


Blimey, if you think that was verbal abuse, you've lead a sheltered life. Oh, and she knew perfectly well I spoke Swedish. And what teh hell difference does it make how much somebody earns?

I was referring more to the comment about me being "arrogant" for posting a link to a comedy sketch about the Danes, but what the hey...
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Puffin
post 31.Jul.2008, 10:12 AM
Post #18
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Well in most countries it would be a source of amazement that a "a daft bint, career burger-flipper" (your description) would, from your pronounciation of the words "chilli cheese", be correctly able to identify your language and respond to you in that language - or perhaps your Swedish pronounciation is not as good as you think and she was taking pity on you biggrin.gif

When it comes to Danish - another matter entirely as there is very little connection between written and spoken language - often the second part of words replaced by guttural stops. They say that this is why Danish children often learn to read on average 1-2 years later than other Nordic countries.


Bye the way you do come accross as very arrogant...
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*Sweat Loaf*
post 31.Jul.2008, 10:21 AM
Post #19


QUOTE (Puffin)
QUOTE (Sweat Loaf)
Blimey, if you think that was verbal abuse, you've lead a sheltered life. Oh, and she knew perfectly well I spoke Swedish. And what teh hell difference does it make how much somebody earns?

I was referring more to the comment about me being "arrogant" for posting a link to a comedy sketch about the Danes, but what the hey...


Well in most countries it would be a source of amazement that a "a daft bint, career burger-flipper" (your description) would, from your pronounciation of the words "chilli cheese", be correctly able to identify your language and respond to you in that language - or perhaps your Swedish pronounciation is not as good as you think and she was taking pity on you biggrin.gif


Gosh! And you call ME arrogant... laugh.gif
As I wrote previously, Swedes are generally very good at spotting a British accent. And seeing as the Swede was never born who didn't have to work at the English "ch" sound, even some dozy Doris stood behind the counter at Burger King has watched enough Midsommer Murders to spot that.


QUOTE (Puffin)
When it comes to Danish - another matter entirely as there is very little connection between written and spoken language - often the second part of words replaced by guttural stops. They say that this is why Danish children often learn to read on average 1-2 years later than other Nordic countries.


What the fuck does that little wombling diversion have to do with the ridiculousness of some humourless sourpuss calling someone "arrogant" for posting a link to an amusing sketch about Denmark?!

QUOTE (Puffin)
Bye the way you do come accross as very arrogant...


How arrogant of you to say so...perhaps you merely feel intimidated by my clearly superior intellect*?
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Puffin
post 31.Jul.2008, 10:40 AM
Post #20
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Sweat Loaf)
Gosh! And you call ME arrogant... laugh.gif
As I wrote previously, Swedes are generally very good at spotting a British accent. And seeing as the Swede was never born who didn't have to work at the English "ch" sound, even some dozy Doris stood behind the counter at Burger King has watched enough Midsommer Murders to spot that.




What the - does that little wombling diversion have to do with the ridiculousness of some humourless sourpuss calling someone "arrogant" for posting a link to an amusing sketch about Denmark?!



How arrogant of you to say so...perhaps you merely feel intimidated by my clearly superior intellect*?


laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
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*Sweat Loaf*
post 31.Jul.2008, 10:51 AM
Post #21


Q.E.D. 8)
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Puffin
post 31.Jul.2008, 11:09 AM
Post #22
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

Well you seem to having a good time this morning - but you actually are very funny - but only when trying to be serious...

I'll get back to the PhD... perhaps you should work on the Swedish accent laugh.gif
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*Sweat Loaf*
post 31.Jul.2008, 11:22 AM
Post #23


I'm having a GREAT time, thanks! And it would be really rather arrogant of you to presume you know when I'm trying to be serious, wouldn't it?

You get back to that PhD again, then.. may I ask what it's in?
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orpoporo
post 31.Jul.2008, 03:34 PM
Post #24
Joined: 8.Aug.2007

aellis 1798

If I were you I would join the London Swedish Language Meetup Group :
http://expatswedish.meetup.com/cities/gb/london/
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orpoporo
post 31.Jul.2008, 03:46 PM
Post #25
Joined: 8.Aug.2007

On-line language exchange is another great alternative :
http://www.mylanguageexchange.com/default.asp

Swedish is a wonderful language ( and this comes from a Finn ! ) The grammar is not too complicated and the words are not so difficult to remember. And do not worry about the accent! People speak Swedish with all kinds of foreign accents here in Stockholm and most of them are easy to understand. In other words : Your accent does not have to be perfect to be understandable and Swedish spoken with a British accent sounds cute to Swedes.
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iloveamma
post 31.Jul.2008, 09:39 PM
Post #26
Joined: 7.Feb.2008

I have had experience at Folkuniversitet and with SFI the Free Swedish course they offer when you get your residence permit in Sweden...and they were both...excuse my French, total crap.
I am a smart college educated person and don't know how anyone could manage to learn Swedish at either of these places, not to mention how overpriced Folkuniversitet is..
I STRONGLY urge everyone to buy the Linguaphone course for Swedish at the site...in 4 hours with their awesome program, I learned more than what 9 hours of class taught me...plus it is 1/8 the price!
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Lost Hammer
post 1.Aug.2008, 07:34 AM
Post #27
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 3.Apr.2007

Wow, just posted in another thread. I must've had a different experience to you!

I completed half the linguaphone course before I moved to sweden, I found it to be really good in the way that it introduced to the grammar by example. But it didn't explain "why" words were ordered like they were, and a more detailed explaination of the grammar. This is where I found folkuni to excel.
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*Sandyclaws*
post 1.Aug.2008, 07:49 AM
Post #28


I find it asking "why" this and that in a language wont help you. Sometimes there isnt any logic in a language... so, the best way is to memorize the rules.
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gzj
post 18.Jan.2010, 12:08 AM
Post #29
Joined: 17.Jan.2010

I've been learning bits of Swedish for a while from a program called Before You Know It [http://www.byki.com/]. Its wonderful and I can't recommend it enough. It tests you on memory, spelling and understanding by using voice and flip cards. There's a free trial too, so you can see if it works for you. Its no where near as expensive as Rosetta either...

I'm moving to Stockholm next month and looking for classes. I'll start at the beginning, with the basics courses, even though they'll probably be a bit simple for me to begin with. Its the speaking it with others that I'm looking forward to. My partner, being Swedish himself, doesn't speak it to me because he hates having to stop all the time to explain what he's saying.

I'm going to try the folkuniversitetet course and see how that goes. It does seem a tad expensive, but it does the intensive courses that I'm interested in.

Oh and try the Go Swedish lessons on YouTube too [http://www.youtube.com/user/GoSwedish] - they are excellent and there's an iPhone app to go with them (though you can't add anything to it, which is a shame!).

Tack så mycket för hjälpen och Lycka Till!
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*victoriachidgey*
post 4.Oct.2014, 11:15 AM
Post #30


QUOTE (gzj @ 17.Jan.2010, 11:08 PM) *
I've been learning bits of Swedish for a while from a program called Before You Know It [http://www.byki.com/]. Its wonderful and I can't recommend it enough. It tests ... (show full quote)


Tack dig sj?lv! This is probably the most helpful reply on this thread.

gzj - I had the same issue with my boyfriend with French. I started responding to him in French after a while (when I could and when I knew how), even when he spoke English to me. After some time he got used to speaking French with me. It's a little strange after you've already established a relationship in one language and it takes getting used to, but I think it's good to have someone you can practice with actively smile.gif
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