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How hard is it to learn Swedish?

Time needed to become fluent in the language

Elllipsis
post 24.Aug.2009, 07:36 PM
Post #16
Joined: 22.Aug.2009

@Puffin

I'm not already a psychiatrist, but I just graduated from medical school and since both Sweden and Portugal belong to the EU, my medical license is recognized there.
During the next year, I'm supposed to do a general medical training here in Portugal and only then do I get to choose and start my specialty training.
My goal was to do my psychiatry training in Sweden, which means I have roughly a year to learn and become fluent in swedish... =/
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DamnImmigrant
post 24.Aug.2009, 08:25 PM
Post #17
Location: Sweden
Joined: 17.May.2009

QUOTE (Elllipsis @ 23.Aug.2009, 09:15 PM) *
@DamnImmigrantAnswering your questions, I'm female, portuguese and our educational system demands that we learn at least 2 foreign languages. Therefore, I am fluent in eng ... (show full quote)

Females have better developed language centers in the brain - so that is a plus!

Some people (not you) have various language difficulties. FLLD, Foreign Language Learning Disability, is one they are trying to figure out because some very intelligent people have almost zero ability to learn another language. Dyslexia can be a problem - there are others, but I think you get the idea.

With all those other languages behind you - I would say you will have NO problem! If you are here and immerse yourself in Swedish - 6 months at the most!

Good Luck
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Elllipsis
post 24.Aug.2009, 08:39 PM
Post #18
Joined: 22.Aug.2009

@DamnImmigrant

Thanks! =)

The only problem is I'll have to learn the language while still in Portugal, and have roughly a year to do that... Do you still think that's possible?
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Puffin
post 25.Aug.2009, 08:07 AM
Post #19
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

As you are already qualified as a doctor in the EU - it may be possible to find a health authority to sponsor you

I am not sure what the current situation is but some health authorities have had active recruitment strategies and langaude programmes for overseas healthcare staff - so it is worth looking up the various county health services - google landsting

For example where I live - Dalarna - they have been actively recruiting doctors and psychiatrists from abroad
http://www.ltdalarna.se/templates/Base____2836.aspx
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irishmark
post 25.Aug.2009, 09:03 AM
Post #20
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 28.May.2009

QUOTE (Bisonex @ 23.Aug.2009, 10:38 PM) *
I am a Brit and I arrived in southern Sweden a couple of weeks ago. I don't speak a word of Swedish, but I am just about fluent in Danish. I understand about 20% of spok ... (show full quote)

Bisonex - I lived in Denmark for 15 months, many years before coming to Sweden. Don't worry, the pronunciation is quite alien at first, but once you learn the pronunciation rules you'll find more and more similarities between Danish and Swedish. There are of course a lot of words that are different, and there are some that have the same meaning but have simply fallen out of use in Sweden even though commonly used in Denmark. You'll probably learn Swedish miuch quicker than someone with no previous Scandanavian language experience though..
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Eel
post 26.Aug.2009, 11:07 AM
Post #21
Joined: 30.May.2008

The difference between Danish/Norwegian and Swedish is basically only a question af pronouncation. If you´re fluent in Danish/Norwegian you´ll be fluent in Swedish within a few months.

I reckon knowledge in German/Dutch will help too. Both languages are closer to Swedish than English is.
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Puffin
post 26.Aug.2009, 01:08 PM
Post #22
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

This is really something of a myth - Danish pronounciation rules are very different to Swedish

The written grammar is quite different - I was on a Swedish course with a Danish psychotherapist - he though it would be easy but never did get the hang of writing Swedish and moved back to Denmark
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caucasus
post 27.Aug.2009, 01:24 PM
Post #23
Location: Asia
Joined: 22.Aug.2009

no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.
as all your languages are influenced and constructed from the old greek and latin.
so all your languages are very similar.
but if someone tries to learn my language ...georgian...
it is very hard,i mean i have never seen any foreigner who could study the grammer of georgian.though many of them were tring...
and russian is also very difficult language especially written russian.
i myself studied english very easily in one year.it is very easy.
learning languages is very entertaining,if you love languages.i myself speak 5 foreign languages and dont have time to improve my english any more,.
my aim is to know all 6 UN languages.4 of them i already know remaining chinese and arabic.
best wishes
archil
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Jewels
post 27.Aug.2009, 01:35 PM
Post #24
Joined: 20.Aug.2009

QUOTE (caucasus @ 27.Aug.2009, 12:24 PM) *
no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.


I think we must have a different view of what fluent means
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Johno
post 27.Aug.2009, 02:03 PM
Post #25
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

QUOTE
no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.

Did you stop at 11 months with English ? Your writing needs some polishing ! biggrin.gif
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Nomark
post 27.Aug.2009, 03:59 PM
Post #26
Joined: 25.Sep.2006

QUOTE (caucasus @ 27.Aug.2009, 02:24 PM) *
no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.as all your languages are influenced and constructed from the old greek and latin.so all your languages are very simi ... (show full quote)


You may have to work harder on your English. The language in your post suggests that you're far from fluent.
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UKLady
post 28.Aug.2009, 07:40 AM
Post #27
Joined: 6.Aug.2009

QUOTE (caucasus @ 27.Aug.2009, 12:24 PM) *
no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.as all your languages are influenced and constructed from the old greek and latin.so all your languages are very simi ... (show full quote)


Erm, while the languages in the EU stem from the same core and several classed under the Germanic Tree, their grammar rules differ widely. For example, in the Swedish and French languages you have both male and female gender words, with German you have 3 - male, female, neutral. Swedish also has en or ett.

English however has one. There are also huge differences within grammar in word formation, placement within sentences, plurals, pronouns, pronounciation, stress on words and of course the parts of a languages grammar that don't follow the grammatical rules.

It is easier to learn English and German (if either one is your mother tongue) than it is to learn say English and French because written German follows (loosly) the same grammatical paths as English - there are no parts of words that are written but not pronounced like there is in French.

Swedish is not easy, but certainly not the hardest language to learn. The more languages you know, obviously, the easier learning another language becomes. Some people have a very strong ability to learn another language while for others its a total struggle.

I suggest also that you re-think your bold statement that EU languages take 1 year to attain fluency in - as your English makes a mockery of the statement.
dry.gif
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Puffin
post 28.Aug.2009, 08:21 AM
Post #28
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (caucasus @ 27.Aug.2009, 02:24 PM) *
no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.as all your languages are influenced and constructed from the old greek and latin.so all your languages are very simi ... (show full quote)


It depends what you meant by "fluent" - your post shows that you do not write fluently in English - many spelling and grammar mistakes.

If you wrote Swedish at this level is would not be regarded as fluent - perhaps the level of a Swedish primary school pupil - grade 5 or 6
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Eel
post 28.Aug.2009, 02:16 PM
Post #29
Joined: 30.May.2008

QUOTE (Puffin @ 26.Aug.2009, 02:08 PM) *
This is really something of a myth - Danish pronounciation rules are very different to Swedish. The written grammar is quite different...


Sure, some people find learning new languages difficult no matter what. But I think most Scandinavians - or people fluent in one of the languages - will find learning another Scandinavian language very easy (compared to "proper" foreign languages). I know quite a lot of people from both sides of Öresund who´ve had very few problems learning Swedish/Danish. And no, written grammar isn´t quite different. There are som differences - such as the Swedish double article (den gamLE björnEN) - but most of the grammar is more or less identical. And Norwegian Bokmål is essentially Danish.

Anyone see Fredrik Lindström discussing Skånska yesterday? Hearing old people from Bornholm speaking a language that is so much closer to Skånska than Rikssvenska is should be a bit of an eye opener for people who claim that (mainland) Scandinavian is divided into three separate languages with nothing in between.
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kaze
post 28.Aug.2009, 02:50 PM
Post #30
Joined: 22.Mar.2008

QUOTE (caucasus @ 27.Aug.2009, 02:24 PM) *
no EU language requires more than 1 year to be fluent at.as all your languages are influenced and constructed from the old greek and latin.so all your languages are very simi ... (show full quote)



Ever heard of false friends?
Superficial similarities can often hinder as well as aid.


QUOTE
Sure, some people find learning new languages difficult no matter what. But I think most Scandinavians - or people fluent in one of the languages - will find learning another Scandinavian language very easy (compared to "proper" foreign languages). I know quite a lot of people from both sides of Öresund who´ve had very few problems learning Swedish/Danish. And no, written grammar isn´t quite different. There are som differences - such as the Swedish double article (den gamLE björnEN) - but most of the grammar is more or less identical. And Norwegian Bokmål is essentially Danish.

I dunno...
Learning to understand the other scandinavian languages- certainly.
But actually learning to speak them?...
It could be seen as just your language but a different dialect/accent. Now that is hard to do for many folk. To take English as an example a Scotsman can learn German just fine but for him to try and switch over entirely into speaking perfect queen's english...a totally different task.
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