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How hard is it to learn Swedish?

Time needed to become fluent in the language

Opalnera
post 27.Feb.2015, 11:17 PM
Post #61
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

Hah why was this old thread dredged up?

Anyone who says they were fluent in under 2 years is probably lying or overestimating their ability. Very few people achieve that. It takes quite a number of years.
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Hisingen
post 28.Feb.2015, 10:42 AM
Post #62
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

Been thinking.

You can do it in a day if you only want to have a one-word vocabulary. How's that?

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Opalnera
post 28.Feb.2015, 10:49 AM
Post #63
Joined: 16.Aug.2010

I can fluently say tack! laugh.gif

It's not just vocabulary either, there is so much more to a language than that. I don't think finishing komvux is a very good indicator either, I know plenty of people who have completed SAS and their Swedish is rubbish.
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Hisingen
post 28.Feb.2015, 11:32 AM
Post #64
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

I have said it several times before. When I came here in '60 there was no SFI or any form of government sponsored courses in Swedish. Consequently, after a failed course of Swedish for Foreigners due to teacher distraction/attraction for one of the participants, I was out on a limb and at no time have had any instruction in the language. But after 55 years of struggling, I can say that I manage pretty well now. The main problem is down-graded hearing which makes it harder to actually hear the words - especially if the one talking is not fully facing me, emphasising the fact that much of language understanding comes from see the person speaking.
'Many is the time I have mentioned the use of comics such as Kalle Anka, and also the use of a good dictionary in which verb declensions are given. My initial dictionary was a 7cm x 14cm x 1 cm Hill's Vest Pocket Dictionary which went everywhere with me. It is here in front of me at this moment, somewhat dog-eared and dishevelled, but it has served me well. Of course, during years of doing translation work the much fuller dictionary came into great use, and it has been that way that my Swedish was improved. So much so that nowadays I can pretty well match the average Swede, and equally match a motor-engineering Swede for vocabulary. There are so many different branches of trade, that one can say that most of them have their own vocabulary - the techy-speak one might call it perhaps. I was once asked if I could do some financial translation, but since that would have meant learning the English for that first, I declined. You won't see me on here talking finance for that reason.
Written Swedish has its problems, too. They have this thing about joining umpteen words together, which makes for difficulties in many ways - dictionaries mostly do not cover such words and if, for example, you are costing a translation, they count the words, and some often result in four, five or even six words in English to achieve the correct result. It can be tough at times. There is also quite a problem with the 'false friends'. I had a whole list of them which were used when I was teaching. The words that are often completely alike, yet have quite different meanings in the two languages.
I will leave you with one very amusing one that comes to mind - the Swedish word for 'speed' for example.

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enigmus
post 5.Mar.2015, 10:02 PM
Post #65
Joined: 7.Feb.2015

QUOTE (Opalnera @ 27.Feb.2015, 11:17 PM) *
Hah why was this old thread dredged up? Anyone who says they were fluent in under 2 years is probably lying or overestimating their ability. Very few people achieve that. I ... (show full quote)


I compel myself to learn 15 new words every day, and take weekly grammar, mostly following SFI programme. But this method isn't good - why? Because, in six months of learning, I am good in understanding written (simpler) texts, I am also good in writing, but when I turn to listening and speeking, I barely undersand people around me. So, use your SFI time as much as you can to train your listening and speeking, words and grammar you can do at home.
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