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Swedish at an university level

and how long does it take to reach this level

lostinSE
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:23 PM
Post #1
Joined: 2.Apr.2012

Hello

What is the minimum level of swedish required to be able to study in swedish at a university in Sweden?
Basically there is this bachelor programme in Uppsala that is 99% in english and they still want me to speak swedish at an university level in order to apply.

Also,how long does it usually take for someone to reach this level?


I assume I will have to provide a certificate in swedish,my question is which one
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Ivor stephé
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:27 PM
Post #2
Joined: 20.Aug.2013

At least 3 years.
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lostinSE
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:29 PM
Post #3
Joined: 2.Apr.2012

QUOTE (Ivor steph? @ 21.Mar.2014, 02:27 PM) *
At least 3 years.


Can it be done in one without being a genius ?
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LauraCristescu
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:32 PM
Post #4
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 8.Nov.2013

Of course. it varies from person to person and how much you are willing to put into it. But i have met people who learned within a year.
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Ivor stephé
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:36 PM
Post #5
Joined: 20.Aug.2013

I highly doubt that level of Swedish would be achievable within 12 months TBH.
And even then you would need to sit a fairly hard exam to prove your ability.
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LauraCristescu
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:50 PM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 8.Nov.2013

Yes, but there is no loss in trying. It depends on many things. If the person is naturally more adept at languages they may catch on much faster. Also knowing english helps a lot since a lot of swedish grammar and words are similar to english, at least from what i've noticed.
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Ivor stephé
post 21.Mar.2014, 02:58 PM
Post #7
Joined: 20.Aug.2013

Oh, I defiantly agree.
I just didn't want to give false hope as the levels required are (I believe) similar to what is considered A level French.
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LauraCristescu
post 21.Mar.2014, 03:03 PM
Post #8
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 8.Nov.2013

TISUS is enough for university level, and you either pass or fail..but yeah, i assume it's quite difficult. I know IELTS was hard, not because of difficulty, but because of the time factor.
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nickoledlaird
post 21.Mar.2014, 10:46 PM
Post #9
Joined: 14.May.2011

I studied a program in V?ster?s at MDH and got my Svenska 3 in 1,5 years so yes it is do-able, but A LOT of work!
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Gröt Havregrynsson
post 4.Jun.2014, 01:45 PM
Post #10
Joined: 4.Mar.2014

From what I've seen, the only way to prove your Swedish level for Uni is to take the TISUS. Even the so-called preparation courses don't give you the requirements afterwards, you still have to take the TISUS.

I think it's possible to do it within a year, and extremely possible to do it within two years (I've been living in Sweden/learning Swedish for two years myself). The problem is that most people are definitely way too lazy to make it in that amount of time, that or their study methods are really bad. You have to write, speak, read, listen, etc. real Swedish and not textbook Swedish or baby-Swedish for learners, and meanwhile actually study grammar and pronunciation too, a lot of students just don't want to do that in their free time. Like me, I never want to speak in Swedish, so guess who failed the speaking part in TISUS. Oh and most textbooks for Swedish seem to be terrible too, so I'd grab a grammar book instead of using a textbook (A Concise Swedish Grammar is one I really like and it's in multiple languages).

Anyway, I just took the TISUS last month. It's not even at "normal native university Swedish" level, for example while one or two of the reading parts on the reading comprehension test were unedited, short articles - others were simplified or shortened. Nothing like reading a chapter of a textbook. They were also very general articles, ex. one was a news blurb on SVT's nature documentary section. In general it's not testing you on "university Swedish" - the things you have to read and understand are nothing like what you would actually have in a lecture or whatever (yeah, I've looked over my wife's class assignments, and even listened to recorded lectures). For example, they theoretically could record lectures or take sections of lessons and have you read/understand them for the TISUS, but everything on there is actually taken from ex. short internet articles or webpages for unrelated things.

The very hard part is knowing what they want in answers. There's no examples of what sort of Swedish passes or fails the TISUS writing/speaking exams and there only seems to be one sample exam online. My wife said "just keep talking, they want to hear that you can actually speak Swedish and they don't care as much if you don't talk on the real subject" but I think that's wrong, because in SFI they would do things like even if my Swedish was more advanced than it should have been at that level, and even if I was correct in all the Swedish they were teaching me in class, they would take points off for me messing up on more advanced grammar that I shouldn't even know yet (instead of ignoring it since it was too advanced anyway).

My wife also thinks that what they want on the essay/writing exam isn't at all the same level as the sorts of essays us English-natives are used to having to write, instead they want something the quality of a blog post (I think that sounds reasonable - I've looked at essays written by Swedes for both gymnasium and university). Also, you should make sure to practise your tricky plurals and when it's en/ett because on the writing exam, that's what I had the most trouble remembering (I thought m
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Gröt Havregrynsson
post 4.Jun.2014, 01:55 PM
Post #11
Joined: 4.Mar.2014

Oh yeah. Something to note for the reading exam. When they take articles off of websites or the news and have you read them on the test, they remove any headings/titles and photos. So like one article on arch?ology-stuff would have made a LOT more sense if they had kept the photos in, and in general all the articles seemed weirdly-written since they removed the section headings. When you read the same articles online and unedited, they're a lot easier and more understandable.
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nickoledlaird
post 4.Jun.2014, 06:40 PM
Post #12
Joined: 14.May.2011

No TISUS is not the only way but good job writing a one page detail of one option.
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lizziebizzie
post 4.Jun.2014, 06:48 PM
Post #13
Joined: 9.Feb.2013

Thanks for the very detailed and interesting posts about TISUS! I was wondering about taking it myself, but I think I'll keep doing Swedish courses to get my Swedish "qualifications" for higher education. I started SFI C this past August and am going to finish SAS 1 in the beginning of July. I'm on track to finish SAS 3 in November. I think it would be possible to get all the way to university level in a year, but you'd have to be quite disciplined and immerse yourself in the language as much as possible while you are studying.

If other people are interested, here is a link which talks about what you need to be eligible to do university in Swedish: https://www.antagning.se/sv/Det-har-galler-...ghet-i-svenska/
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Gröt Havregrynsson
post 4.Jun.2014, 07:26 PM
Post #14
Joined: 4.Mar.2014

QUOTE (nickoledlaird @ 4.Jun.2014, 05:40 PM) *
No TISUS is not the only way but good job writing a one page detail of one option.

Then could you tell us what the other ways are? All I've found are these:

- Take the TISUS
- Take some Swedish courses here in Sweden and then still have to take the TISUS afterwards (as your "final exam")
- Have taken Swedish classes in your home country already
- Have had a Nordic education and thus already have Swedish/Danish gymnasium credits
- Be an exchange student and take courses for exchange students to learn Swedish (applying as a normal resident you wouldn't be allowed to take them, and as an exchange student if you're from outside of Europe you'll have to pay tuition too)
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magg
post 4.Jun.2014, 10:23 PM
Post #15
Joined: 7.Oct.2013

You are missing the by far most common one - taking all levels of Swedish at Komvux. After you finish SFI, you can take SAS G, SAS 1, SAS 2, SAS 3. After SAS 3 you are eligible for university studies. It is the most common way to do it, as on most permits it also entitles you to a CSN grant, so it's not only free, you get paid to study.

If you didn't know about this until now, look into it. It will be easy for you to pass it if you can speak Swedish as well as you claim and your pass/fail will not depend on one time performance as it does for TISUS but on extensive coursework.
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