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Learning Swedish with music :D

trying to

BelleP
post 7.Oct.2014, 02:03 PM
Post #1
Joined: 27.Aug.2014

I have found so many great singers that sings swedish songs now and it have really helped me a lot with me learning Swedish. smile.gif

You should listen to Veronica Maggio and Lars Winnerb?ck, great music!

And here is a new talent that I listen to right now and trying to learn what he is saying just by listening:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqUug5y-nd8

And yes the Swedish lyrics in the description does help me a bit tongue.gif

Do u have any suggestions on some new swedish songs?

Hejd?!
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*allegro805*
post 17.Oct.2014, 08:09 PM
Post #2


I'm old, but I like most of the entire album "Djupa Andetag" (1996) by Frida (from ABBA). Most of it's on YouTube, along with a lot of various Swedish tunes by ABBA.

"?ven en Blomma": http://youtu.be/0VB-MHbK4yE

For a completely different type of music, Dungen: http://youtu.be/m5DHjLGqGa4
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Hisingen
post 18.Oct.2014, 01:04 PM
Post #3
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

Like allegro805 I am old, and in a course in 1960 we students did our best to sing along for our teacher. But - whatever you do - do not try to sing along with any Evert Taube song. Great though they are once you know Swedish, he did his best to fit so many words onto one crotchet that for a non-Swedish speaker it was totally impossible. On the other hand, Lasse Dahlquist songs, such as Dance p? Br?nn? Brygga, were much easier. Melodic. interesting, and even remembered to this day.
Personally, after having had only P3, P4 and a commercial radio to listen to for three days whilst in hospital, I have never heard so much uninteresting music as Swedish radio serves up. The songs say little, are monotonous and exceedingly repetitive with, to me, meaningless phrases. A total waste of time, money, recording material and effort in the main.
For anyone wishing to learn Swedish via music, I feel you have to endeavour to turn the clock back a few years to when there was meaning in the texts and the songs were sung such that you could make sense of the words.
Almost a Swedish equivalent of Queen, if I may draw a comparison. But that is asking too much perhaps.
But you are into one of the right ways of learning the language - that through music. Another, believe it or not, is that of reading the likes of Donald Duck . Kalle Anka in Swedish. That way you will be surprised how much you learn, as a child does, of those 'small words' and the shortened form that they use at times, and which are pretty important in everyday language. People have laughed at me over the years when I recommend this method, until they, too, have found how helpful it actually is. It is also a humorous way of learning the language.
But back to the 'musical way'. Consider my point regarding the older generation of singers and songs for clarity of words and even easier music. And good luck - to you and to all endeavouring to learn this not-too-easy-language. My first word - and only word when I came here was a very important one. SK?L.
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BelleP
post 24.Oct.2014, 08:59 AM
Post #4
Joined: 27.Aug.2014

QUOTE (Hisingen @ 18.Oct.2014, 01:04 PM) *
Like allegro805 I am old, and in a course in 1960 we students did our best to sing along for our teacher. But - whatever you do - do not try to sing along with any Evert Taube ... (show full quote)



Haha! Well, I haven?t heard so much of the older generation of singers and songs yet. But now I definitely will! The Donald Duck method sounds amazing, now I just have to find one smile.gif My first word was also Sk?l! It?s very important haha! Now I am learning the most common swedish christmas phrases, like God Jul, Gl?gg, Julafton, Tomte smile.gif
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Hisingen
post 24.Oct.2014, 10:56 PM
Post #5
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

[quote name='BelleP' post='845447' date='24.Oct.2014, 07:59 AM']Haha! Well, I haven
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Emerentia
post 12.Jan.2015, 04:54 PM
Post #6
Joined: 23.Dec.2011

These are not new at all, but If I were you I would get "Absoute Sommar", with a lot of classic songs in Swedish. And also "Svensktoppen 50 ?r".

Some are are good and some are really cheesy, but there are a lot of songs that you just should know if you live in Sweden. You don't have to get the whole albums, but it's a list of songs you definity should listen to one way or another. It's sort of Swedish music history and songs almost every Swede knows. You get to know Sweden a bit more by listening to these songs I think.

http://cdon.se/musik/absolute_music/absolu...3cd%29-20392061
http://cdon.se/musik/various_artists/svens...5cd%29-21366222
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Svensksmith
post 12.Jan.2015, 05:05 PM
Post #7
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

When I was more diligently studying Swedish, I used comic books to translate. The pictures helped keep my interest and the dialog helped me with the common vernacular and slang.
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badkarma
post 12.Jan.2015, 05:54 PM
Post #8
Joined: 19.Dec.2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWHxsqOl_v0
should check out Cornelis Vreeswijk.
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Hisingen
post 12.Jan.2015, 07:21 PM
Post #9
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

QUOTE (Svensksmith @ 12.Jan.2015, 05:05 PM) *
When I was more diligently studying Swedish, I used comic books to translate. The pictures helped keep my interest and the dialog helped me with the common vernacular and slang.

I have advocated that method for years, having found it extremely helpful in my early days here. There are many who deride it, but as you say, there are the pictures for added interest, and also to substantiate the text. You get to learn phrases that courses tend to overlook - just as children learn them, and it provides - I firmly believe - that little extra padding.

I have had a lot of flak from the 'educated ones' on here, but I sometimes have wondered just how educated they actually were, or were they just being snobbish and oh so superior? You know how some folks can be.

I was simply being practical whilst endeavouring to be helpful, knowing how it had helped me when there were very few courses other than Swedish for Foreigners.
smile.gif
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*LEDsale.se*
post 13.Jan.2015, 05:07 AM
Post #10


Everybody knows that Allan Edwall is the greatest.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBeEfziIMFw
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