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The Local _ Studying _ Is “grund” Swedish worth it?

Posted by: hanmaltkvist 8.Mar.2018, 10:39 AM

I’ve completed SFI and consider myself nearly fluent (Theres always room for improvement) and right now I’m doing the Svenska som andraspråk delkurs 3, the second to last of the “grund”.

When applying, I was under the impression that this was what I needed to do in order to continue studying Swedish, but I don’t find myself learning much Swedish at all. The course doesn’t focus on the Swedish language itself, but instead literature concepts such as different styles of texts.

I find it to be horribly dull, as they’re the exact same concepts I learned in school, simply in a different language. I’m about half way through with this course and will probably force myself to finish it, but is the “grund” really even necessary to find a job/Persue higher education in English?

Posted by: ölgård 8.Mar.2018, 12:02 PM

I guess you meant to say is "Pursue higher education in Swedish"

I did SFi till level D and quit when I found my job. In my opinion, SFI is not to fully prepare you for any job/ to pursue education but to give you the basics for you to build on wherever you may find yourself. Meaning you will have to learn new vocabulary/terminologies depending on you profession/area of studies.

When I started work I could speak Swedish at an OK level, follow conversations and take part in meetings.

Looking back, i think I made a right decision to quit at that level cause there was no way I could have learnt what I know now in the classroom. I believe its the same with pursuing higher education.

My advice is to leave the class envinronment as soon as you can read/write a full article in a newspaper and understand the context. The real world teaches you more than you will ever learn in class.

Goodluck.

Posted by: Bsmith 8.Mar.2018, 02:28 PM

If your objective is just to be fluent, then all you need to further that goal is to speak and read.

Posted by: hanmaltkvist 8.Mar.2018, 02:29 PM

No, I did actually mean in English, as the university program I applied to is entirely in English.

I actually do already have a job, in fact, I began working in Sweden long before I actually got a place in SFI.

However, I was under the impression that in order to improve my swedish more it would help me to continue studying, even though in reality it was speaking Swedish at my job that truly helped me the most.

So yeah, I don’t really feel like I’ve learned much or improved much after SFI, just had deadlines and books to read.

Posted by: Bsmith 8.Mar.2018, 04:26 PM

Only you can decide how to best allocate your time. But, if you think it is a waste of time and yet still continue...

Posted by: hanmaltkvist 12.Mar.2018, 04:30 PM

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 8.Mar.2018, 09:26 AM) *
Only you can decide how to best allocate your time. But, if you think it is a waste of time and yet still continue...


I don't necessarily find it to be a waste of time, I just didn't find it to be as informative as I had previously imagined. However, my teacher spoke with me after my most recent test and she felt as though I should be moved to the next level class as I demonstrated a grasp of the language beyond the level of the class I was currently in.
So hopefully moving up to the next class will be what I needed to actually get something out of it, if not, I'll quit.

But as I said, I do already have a job where I speak Swedish, and I study distans so it's not like it's a huge time suck, 1-2 hours a week MAYBE, and after speaking with some of my classmates/friends it seems like a good idea to finish the class for the betyg, particularly since I do want to continue on to university. (even though the program I've applied for is in English)

Posted by: yet another brit 12.Mar.2018, 07:18 PM

Once you get to a comfortable level, the best way to improve is to use, especially at work. But - make sure to read and (especially) write as well as talk. All those homophonics...

In my opinion, you only really need to take courses up to the level you will need for whatever job/studies you want to do.

Posted by: rex 18.Apr.2018, 09:20 PM

It depends on what you consider "good Swedish" and the amount of spare time you have. If you've got German or any of the Germanic languages as a mother tongue then you could get away with reading, writing, and speaking on your own. You will just automatically absorb the language.

Foreigners who are proper immigrants here don't have any other choice but to go through sfi, then svenska grund, and finally svenska som andraspråk 1-2-3-4. I'd say that on average these courses are more about learning the basics of the language and getting certificates that will allow you to study in Swedish at a university; this is very important if you don't have sufficient education to work in Sweden.

Lately, if you're perceived as one of "those immigrants" almost every employer will require you first to speak excellent Swedish before they even consider you for a job opening. That's a Catch-22 situation, you need contact with Swedish to learn Swedish, and you need to already know Swedish to get into contact with Swedish; these courses are the only way around it.

Posted by: hanmaltkvist 19.Apr.2018, 11:07 AM

QUOTE (rex @ 18.Apr.2018, 03:20 PM) *
It depends on what you consider "good Swedish" and the amount of spare time you have. If you've got German or any of the Germanic languages as a mother tongue then you could get away with reading, writing, and speaking on your own. You will just automatically absorb the language.

Foreigners who are proper immigrants here don't have any other choice but to go through sfi, then svenska grund, and finally svenska som andraspråk 1-2-3-4. I'd say that on average these courses are more about learning the basics of the language and getting certificates that will allow you to study in Swedish at a university; this is very important if you don't have sufficient education to work in Sweden.

Lately, if you're perceived as one of "those immigrants" almost every employer will require you first to speak excellent Swedish before they even consider you for a job opening. That's a Catch-22 situation, you need contact with Swedish to learn Swedish, and you need to already know Swedish to get into contact with Swedish; these courses are the only way around it.



I suppose I am sort of an exception here as I have had a job and been working in Sweden even before I spoke Swedish, and since I’m from the US I am quite lucky to have English as my first language so I’ve already been accepted into a university program taught in English.

I have been told I speak Swedish well, but of course there is always room for improvement. I will complete svenska som andraspråk in June and from there I will probably not continue on to gymnasiet.

Posted by: rex 19.Apr.2018, 10:52 PM

QUOTE (hanmaltkvist @ 19.Apr.2018, 12:07 PM) *
I suppose I am sort of an exception here as I have had a job and been working in Sweden even before I spoke Swedish, and since I’m from the US I am quite lucky to have English as my first language so I’ve already been accepted into a university program taught in English.

I have been told I speak Swedish well, but of course there is always room for improvement. I will complete svenska som andraspråk in June and from there I will probably not continue on to gymnasiet.


It depends on the field, your education, connections, and place of origin. I could also add that Americans, Australians, and Brits are not considered immigrants in Sweden, at worst you'd be perceived as loud friends. Immigrants are the white people who come from Southern and Eastern Europe, and other less desirable countries as seen by Swedes.

I am nonetheless surprised that you think your Swedish is that great, usually people who have English as a first language have difficulties with the language. Maybe you are indeed an exception. How long have you lived in Sweden?

Posted by: hanmaltkvist 20.Apr.2018, 02:56 PM

QUOTE (rex @ 19.Apr.2018, 04:52 PM) *
It depends on the field, your education, connections, and place of origin. I could also add that Americans, Australians, and Brits are not considered immigrants in Sweden, at worst you'd be perceived as loud friends. Immigrants are the white people who come from Southern and Eastern Europe, and other less desirable countries as seen by Swedes.

I am nonetheless surprised that you think your Swedish is that great, usually people who have English as a first language have difficulties with the language. Maybe you are indeed an exception. How long have you lived in Sweden?


I’ve lived in Sweden almost two years and of course in the beginning I struggled a lot with the language, the sounds, the vowels, spelling, but i’ve put a lot of time and effort into studying, speaking, and practicing so I am fairly confident in my Swedish.

Posted by: JonG 16.May.2018, 01:44 PM

QUOTE (rex @ 18.Apr.2018, 10:20 PM) *
Foreigners who are proper immigrants here don't have any other choice but to go through sfi, then svenska grund, and finally svenska som andraspråk 1-2-3-4. I'd say that on average these courses are more about learning the basics of the language and getting certificates that will allow you to study in Swedish at a university; this is very important if you don't have sufficient education to work in Sweden.


Could anyone help elaborate on the different study options for continuing beyond SFI please, as I'm a bit confused by the above quote which seems to imply that Grund and svenska som andraspråk are different things, and that you should do grund before svenska som andraspråk. My situation is that I've just finished SFI D and am now in contact with my local kommun trying to understand the possibilities to continue learning Swedish (as by my own estimation I'm still pretty hopeless at it!).

The initial info I have is that my next step should be to apply to svenska som Andraspråk delkurs 2 via distans (since I'm working during the days so can't attend lessons). I had understood from the below link that svenska som andraspråk is the same as grundläggande vuxenutbildning ("Grund"?).

I have searched the forum for "andraspråk" and only two topics appear, neither of which really helped me understand how many options there might be post SFI or how they compare.

https://www.andrasprak.su.se/sfi-vuxenutbildning/styrdokument/svenska-som-andraspr%C3%A5k-grundl%C3%A4ggande-vuxenutbildning-1.83224

Ps.. I'm asking this so I go armed with info and can ask the right questions of my kommun, instead of blindly signing up to whatever single option they might be offering me.

Thanks all.

Posted by: JonG 20.May.2018, 11:55 AM

Hi all, can anyone shed any light on my questions above? Thanks.

Posted by: loobiecore 2.Jul.2018, 02:36 AM

QUOTE (JonG @ 20.May.2018, 05:55 AM) *
Hi all, can anyone shed any light on my questions above? Thanks.


I have the same question, so I've done my best to research this. I think (but am not certain) that SAS grund is equivalent to finishing SFI. If you want to enroll in SAS 1, you need either SFI or grund, not both.

Hope this helps! Let me know if you can verify this.

Posted by: Mib 2.Jul.2018, 11:28 AM

QUOTE (JonG @ 16.May.2018, 02:44 PM) *
Could anyone help elaborate on the different study options for continuing beyond SFI please, as I'm a bit confused by the above quote which seems to imply that Grund and svenska som andraspråk are different things, and that you should do grund before svenska som andraspråk. My situation is that I've just finished SFI D and am now in contact with my local kommun trying to understand the possibilities to continue learning Swedish (as by my own estimation I'm still pretty hopeless at it!).

The initial info I have is that my next step should be to apply to svenska som Andraspråk delkurs 2 via distans (since I'm working during the days so can't attend lessons). I had understood from the below link that svenska som andraspråk is the same as grundläggande vuxenutbildning ("Grund"?).

I have searched the forum for "andraspråk" and only two topics appear, neither of which really helped me understand how many options there might be post SFI or how they compare.

https://www.andrasprak.su.se/sfi-vuxenutbildning/styrdokument/svenska-som-andraspr%C3%A5k-grundl%C3%A4ggande-vuxenutbildning-1.83224

Ps.. I'm asking this so I go armed with info and can ask the right questions of my kommun, instead of blindly signing up to whatever single option they might be offering me.

Thanks all.


You've been given the correct information. When you've completed SFI, you can start from svenska som andraspråk 2. I did exactly that via distance learning using Hermods. I applied via my Kommun online. Then they confirm within a week or more and then you're ready to start the next course start date.

As someone explained, it's more of getting the certification to get to study Swedish at University level. I found it okay and a good refresher, but you only truly learn by doing. At level 2, where I stopped, you choose a Swedish book to read and then you provide a written review towards the end and have a muntlig exam as well, which will cover the book as well as other things. It covers Swedish history, taxes, politics etc and there's usually a part every 2 weeks or so for you to record yourself answering the questions at the end of each section, as well as written answers.

As far as grundläggande is concerned, I'm not sure, but it probably refers to level 1 of svenska som andraspråk, which you bypass if you've completed SFI. Give Hermods a call and I'm sure they'll be able to answer that question. They're very helpful in my experience.

https://www.hermods.se/utbildning-tjanster/svenska-som-andrasprak-1/ Contact number is at the bottom of the web page.

Posted by: cookie18 9.Jul.2018, 05:46 PM

QUOTE (loobiecore @ 2.Jul.2018, 03:36 AM) *
I have the same question, so I've done my best to research this. I think (but am not certain) that SAS grund is equivalent to finishing SFI. If you want to enroll in SAS 1, you need either SFI or grund, not both.

Hope this helps! Let me know if you can verify this.


QUOTE (Mib @ 2.Jul.2018, 12:28 PM) *
You've been given the correct information. When you've completed SFI, you can start from svenska som andraspråk 2. I did exactly that via distance learning using Hermods. I applied via my Kommun online. Then they confirm within a week or more and then you're ready to start the next course start date.

As someone explained, it's more of getting the certification to get to study Swedish at University level. I found it okay and a good refresher, but you only truly learn by doing. At level 2, where I stopped, you choose a Swedish book to read and then you provide a written review towards the end and have a muntlig exam as well, which will cover the book as well as other things. It covers Swedish history, taxes, politics etc and there's usually a part every 2 weeks or so for you to record yourself answering the questions at the end of each section, as well as written answers.

As far as grundläggande is concerned, I'm not sure, but it probably refers to level 1 of svenska som andraspråk, which you bypass if you've completed SFI. Give Hermods a call and I'm sure they'll be able to answer that question. They're very helpful in my experience.

https://www.hermods.se/utbildning-tjanster/svenska-som-andrasprak-1/ Contact number is at the bottom of the web page.



These are wrong!!!

The way it goes is:

SFI -> SAS grund del 1, 2, 3, 4 -> SAS 1, 2, 3

('grundläggande' means basic, 'del' means part)

Sometimes there is a placement test at the beginning of the first SAS grund class where you can skip 1 or 2 grund courses by doing well in the placement test.

Posted by: Mib 10.Jul.2018, 09:44 PM

QUOTE (cookie18 @ 9.Jul.2018, 06:46 PM) *
These are wrong!!!

The way it goes is:

SFI -> SAS grund del 1, 2, 3, 4 -> SAS 1, 2, 3

('grundläggande' means basic, 'del' means part)

Sometimes there is a placement test at the beginning of the first SAS grund class where you can skip 1 or 2 grund courses by doing well in the placement test.


Which bit darling? It WAS as stated, because I had passed SFI, I could start with SAS 2 as informed by very helpful Swedish people who work with those courses. Thank you Cookie. Don't crumble. smile.gif

Posted by: cookie18 12.Jul.2018, 10:57 AM

QUOTE (Mib @ 10.Jul.2018, 10:44 PM) *
Which bit darling? It WAS as stated, because I had passed SFI, I could start with SAS 2 as informed by very helpful Swedish people who work with those courses. Thank you Cookie. Don't crumble. smile.gif


Sorry if I sounded rude.

It's extremely rare that one can go from SFI directly to SAS 2 since that would mean skipping all of SAS grund and SAS 1.

What I meant was wrong is this:
QUOTE
As far as grundläggande is concerned, I'm not sure, but it probably refers to level 1 of svenska som andraspråk, which you bypass if you've completed SFI.


As I mentioned, SAS 1 is not SAS grundläggande del 1. SAS 1 is a gymnasiet course.

Posted by: JonG 12.Jul.2018, 11:22 AM

I think the problem is the terminology is so confusing. I'm currently enrolled with SAS delkurs 2 (following which I have delkurs 3 and delkurs 4 to move onto) and I asked my kommun why I wasn't beginning with delkurs 1 and they said there is no delkurs 1 because "that is grund and we don't put students who completed SFI into that because it repeats the same material"

So I've gone straight from SFI D, where the teachers were happy if you could stumble through a sentence and know a few verbs straight onto SAS delkurs 2, where we are expected to read a huge autobiography in Swedish (I'm having to look up 15-20 words per page!).

When I received the reading list for my course it contained every course and there was more than one SAS course with different study books for each. One was described as SAS Grundläggande (which turns out to be the one I'm on) and the other one was written as SAS gymnasienivå.

I can't relate this terminology to what cookie refers to as SAS 1 and SAS 2, except to think I'm on SAS 1 which is broken down into parts 2,3 &4 as long as you've done SFI, otherwise you will start on part 1).

Posted by: cookie18 13.Jul.2018, 12:53 PM

You are right that the terminology is confusing.

However, when people say SAS 1, they usually mean the gymnasiet course, at least in my experience.

Here is what Hermods says
"Vill du fortsätta studera läser du grundläggande vuxenutbildning. Du börjar med grundläggande svenska som andraspråk (SAS grund). Grundläggande vuxenutbildning kan du läsa hos Hermods på distans eller i klassrum - vad som pasar dig bäst!

När du är klar med grundläggande vuxenutbildning kan du studera gymnasial vuxenutbildning eller läsa en gymnasial yrkesutbildning."

https://www.hermods.se/utbildningar-och-tjanster/new-in-sweden-sfi-och-integration/sfi-svenska-invandrare/efter-sfi/

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