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Lightbulbs and lamps!

Can you buy "english" lightbulbs in Sweden?

Durban1312
post 5.Aug.2010, 07:13 AM
Post #1
Joined: 7.Jun.2010

Hello, we'll be joining the rush and moving full time to Sweden at the end of the year (yeah ... bad timing but can't be helped) and my question is: can you buy "english" type lightbulbs in Sweden? To expand a bit, we have several table lamps, and standards (tall) lamps that we own and like and are part of home which we expect to bring with us. However whilst I can overcome the problem of 'wrong' plugs on the end of cables, by adapters or probably fitting new uns, the bit at the top where the bulb plugs in is a different story. dry.gif My impression is that all lights in Sweden have "screw-in" bulbs rather than bayonets, but can one get hold of bayonet bulbs easily/anywhere? I'd prefer to bring our lights than dump em! Even more of a shame if the bulbs slowly die out over the first year!!! Thanks.
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Johno
post 5.Aug.2010, 09:43 AM
Post #2
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Cant give positive help about bayonet bulbs, having never seen them for sale. But can only say we took over a wall light with bayonet fitting, and took with it 2 low energy bulbs. To clarify, these have much longer life than incandescent bulbs. So take your lamps with a stock of low energy bulbs. You can always get some spares posted to you or pick them up when on holiday, though what you take could last you many many years.
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Essingen
post 5.Aug.2010, 12:19 PM
Post #3
Joined: 2.Nov.2008

QUOTE
My impression is that all lights in Sweden have "screw-in" bulbs rather than bayonets, but can one get hold of bayonet bulbs easily/anywhere?


You can get them, but they are difficult to find and can be pricy. Our Brf has a Christmas tree that uses 15 watt bulbs with bayonet fittings and we found some at a small shop in Odenplan. But you have to ask around.
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Streja
post 5.Aug.2010, 12:54 PM
Post #4
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

It's just another one of those things that the UK has to do differently. smile.gif

Perhaps they just thought everyone would stay on the island and never leave with lamps. wink.gif

I say just bring loads whenever you're in the UK for a visit, and have relatives bring some.

Also good to use low energy ones as stated before.
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007
post 5.Aug.2010, 01:21 PM
Post #5
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

low energy lamps are not always good to use. they're overrated. there are pros and there are cons environmental-wise..
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Johno
post 5.Aug.2010, 01:26 PM
Post #6
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

I am not advocating low energy bulbs, and especially scorn the idea that their use saves lots of energy. Used in the house during most of the year, their heat output just results in less heat being required from radiators. Only strange that many cannot see that. But just in this instance their smaller size and long life could be a virtue. The op can make his own mind up. smile.gif

QUOTE
It's just another one of those things that the UK has to do differently

Like UK electrical plugs, its more a case of parallel development where different parts of the world homed in on different fittings. When you have a large home market why change ? The UK has always used bayonet bulbs for house lights but screw bulbs for many smaller sizes. However, just to point out that the world until very recently always used bayonet fitting bulbs in cars on the grounds that they are more vibration proof.
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Streja
post 5.Aug.2010, 01:34 PM
Post #7
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

I suppose it's to counteract the vibrations felt in a British house whenever anyone walks up the stairs unto the landing of the second floor.

wink.gif

I'm not saying change it, but it would be nicer if the UK had adapted to the rest of Europe rather than being so bloody isolationist. wink.gif They see it as a sport.

We'll all use lasers like in Star Wars soon.
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Streja
post 5.Aug.2010, 01:36 PM
Post #8
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

It's ok I love the UK really.

*hides from Johno's wrath*
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Streja
post 5.Aug.2010, 01:36 PM
Post #9
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

LED lights are very good though environmentally wise.

They are also low energy.
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007
post 5.Aug.2010, 01:57 PM
Post #10
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Streja @ 5.Aug.2010, 02:36 PM) *
LED lights are very good though environmentally wise.. They are also low energy.


as pointed out, low energy in a heated room with a thermostat isn't necessarily doing mother earth any favors. outside (where the heat is lost to the cosmos) they are the only option that makes environmental sense.
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Streja
post 5.Aug.2010, 02:02 PM
Post #11
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

Heat from LED?

I have to go touch my lightbulbs now.
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007
post 5.Aug.2010, 02:07 PM
Post #12
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Streja @ 5.Aug.2010, 03:02 PM) *
Heat from LED?. I have to go touch my lightbulbs now.

that's not a euphemism is it now? wink.gif

all lights emit heat. low energy is basically the synonym for low heat emission.
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Johno
post 5.Aug.2010, 02:15 PM
Post #13
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Just to finish my rational streak. The daft part of the low energy lightbulb change (glad Im not the only one to see it) is that outdoors, especially where lots of illumination is required like street lights, they moved almost everything to high light output lower energy long long ago. And domestically, they legislated to completely changed incadescent bulbs to mercury containing fluorescent types containing at least some electronic parts and made in China. Will they be all be disposed of safely via recycling sites when their life is over ? Vote now !
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voyager
post 5.Aug.2010, 02:19 PM
Post #14
Joined: 18.Oct.2007

you can get them here.


http://www.lysman.com/1/sv/sokresultat/sokresultat.php
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nlidukdese
post 5.Aug.2010, 02:31 PM
Post #15
Joined: 31.Jan.2007

QUOTE (7 @ 5.Aug.2010, 02:57 PM) *
as pointed out, low energy in a heated room with a thermostat isn't necessarily doing mother earth any favors. outside (where the heat is lost to the cosmos) they are the ... (show full quote)

If with 'environmental sense' you refer to CO2 emissions, then you're comparing apples and oranges. Yes, traditional light bulbs produce heat, but producing heat through electricity is a pretty inefficient use of energy. However, in Sweden almost all electricity comes from either nuclear or hydropower, both of which do not emit CO2 (or hardly any, to be more precise). Sources for domestic heating in Sweden are more diverse and include fossil fuels, like oil. Where I live there's district heating (fjärrvärme), which is also pretty much carbon neutral. This means that for me there's no tradeoff from an environmental perspective: both heating options are CO2 free (although electricity is more expensive).

Contrary to Sweden, in most other countries electricity generation is a source of CO2 emissions. There relying on electricity for direct heating (e.g. light bulbs, electric heaters) is worse from a CO2 perspective than using central heating, which is far more efficient. The difference is greatest when electricity is generated from coal and the central heating uses natural gas.
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