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Where to buy grits/polenta in Stockholm?

US Expat in need of Southern US breakfast food!

erelak
post 24.Jul.2016, 05:07 PM
Post #1
Joined: 24.Jul.2016

Hello :-)
I'm a southern girl (southern USA) looking for a place to buy grits locally. They are made of corn but they are not the same as corn meal. The kind of grits I like are often sold under the name "polenta", which is an Italian dish. There was an "American-style" grocery store in Iceland ("Kostur") where they were readily available but I haven't seen something similar here yet. Is there a traditional Italian grocery store that might carry this?

Any assistance is appreciated. Of course, I can have family ship them to me or order via Amazon but I'd rather have a local source.

Thanks!
 
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Hisingen
post 24.Jul.2016, 05:22 PM
Post #2
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

Why not try to find something from the Swedish shelves? There is quite a large selection available that might well come close to what you require. After all - when in Rome - - - .
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erelak
post 24.Jul.2016, 05:38 PM
Post #3
Joined: 24.Jul.2016

Good suggestion! I'm hoping to avoid some trial and error but I may well end up doing quite a bit of experimenting if I can't find something that is similar enough smile.gif
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erelak
post 24.Jul.2016, 05:43 PM
Post #4
Joined: 24.Jul.2016

...And they don't have to be this exact thing in the photo above but I thought a visual might be helpful- I'm happy to switch to a Swedish equivalent if there is one!
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yet another brit
post 24.Jul.2016, 07:16 PM
Post #5
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

You should be able to get polenta in most large supermarkets. It will be lurking in the "health food" aisle along with the dried lentils. Look for the Risenta brand, it is widely available.

You could try making polenta (italian style) with Västerbotten cheese in it. Delicious!

There is an American food store or two - www.grays.se, www.theamericanstore.se - and at least where I live (northern Stockholm) the larger ICAs tend to have a specifically American part-aisle, with your fill of Oreos, Reeses, Newmans, and even Mac 'n cheese. I sometimes buy the Caesar dressing when I can't be bothered to make my own.

Though why anyone not born & raised south of the Mason-Dixon line would ever consider grits to be food...
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erelak
post 24.Jul.2016, 07:56 PM
Post #6
Joined: 24.Jul.2016

Thanks so much, @yet another brit! I will keep my eye out for that brand.

I've got my icelandic husband hooked and he was born quite far above the Mason-Dixon line smile.gif
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erelak
post 24.Jul.2016, 07:59 PM
Post #7
Joined: 24.Jul.2016

Also, I'm not saying grits are the greatest thing in life for everyone but for me they are both yummy (with or without cheese) and provide a much needed nostalgia fix as well smile.gif I've been eating them almost every day since I was a kid.
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littleviking
post 24.Jul.2016, 09:44 PM
Post #8
Joined: 26.Feb.2014

every supermarket has some brand of polenta i get mine from willys
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Bsmith
post 24.Jul.2016, 10:29 PM
Post #9
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

I remember when we lived in Sweden there was one, dusty jar of peanut butter on the shelf at our little village ICA. I LOVE peanut butter so I bought it. Next week there was another jar so I bought that, too. This continued until the jars started looking newer. The owner must have figured there was a demand and bought a case. Then we moved.

There is probably a case of peanut butter sitting in the back room, gathering dust, waiting for the next American family to move to that village.
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Emerentia
post 24.Jul.2016, 11:45 PM
Post #10
Joined: 23.Dec.2011

There is also a biodynamic brand called Saltå kvarn, it's quite common in most supermarkets.
http://www.saltakvarn.se/produkter/polenta/
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yet another brit
post 25.Jul.2016, 05:32 PM
Post #11
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

QUOTE (erelak @ 24.Jul.2016, 07:56 PM) *
I've got my icelandic husband hooked and he was born quite far above the Mason-Dixon line smile.gif


I suppose for someone from a country that enjoys fermented shark and lamb smoked over burning sheep poo, even grits could be given a chance :-)

I tried the "smoked lamb" once, and it was very tasty. The Icelandic hosts didn't tell me how it was made until afterwards, mind.
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littleviking
post 26.Jul.2016, 07:37 AM
Post #12
Joined: 26.Feb.2014

QUOTE (yet another brit @ 25.Jul.2016, 05:32 PM) *
I suppose for someone from a country that enjoys fermented shark and lamb smoked over burning sheep poo, even grits could be given a chance :-) I tried the "smoked lamb&q ... (show full quote)


that is why you should taste everything and after if you like it ask what it is
i think if you know wat you are eating you will most likely thing ewwwww
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