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To get or not to get Swedish citizenship

I'm ambivalent about it

rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 02:05 PM
Post #31
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

QUOTE (Abe L @ 11.Mar.2012, 01:04 PM) *
Later on it can also pay off if you can hand them down to your offspring, potentially making moving around and living in certain countries easier. Having a US citizenship hand ... (show full quote)

The only caveat to US citizenship is, of course, the absurd tax liability =/
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cogito
post 11.Mar.2012, 02:28 PM
Post #32
Joined: 30.Dec.2009

QUOTE (Miss Kitten @ 11.Mar.2012, 09:44 AM) *
This was my understanding of the implications of dual citizenship as well. One of your countries of citizenship will not shelter you from the other should you get in some kind of trouble in it.

How would they know you are dual? You would show only one or the other passport when you enter a third country.
If I were in trouble somewhere in a strange land, I'd turn to the British, the French or the American Embassy--all of which have good records of helping even non-citizens as well as their own in times of disaster. The Swedish embassies are notoriously unhelpful to their citizens in trouble.

As to your original question: As it stands today, dual citizenship is permitted (well, tolerated) by both the U.S. and Sweden.This could change. The current White House assumes all expats are tax cheats or money launderers. And they are all considered guilty until they spend time and money proving themselves innocent. See the TL story on: http://www.thelocal.se/39522/20120306/
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Puffin
post 11.Mar.2012, 02:33 PM
Post #33
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (gplusa @ 11.Mar.2012, 01:50 PM) *
Puffin, my citizenship application took 4 weeks. To the day. So that's how long I was without a passport. You take the gamble. That being said, if you need to travel out o ... (show full quote)

I guess I am freaked as it says 7-9 months on the website

If anything happened to my mother not sure I would be prepared to wait 48 hours to travel

It's annoying as under the old rules you could get your passport back during the processing until the decision was made
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rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 02:47 PM
Post #34
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

QUOTE (cogito @ 11.Mar.2012, 01:28 PM) *
How would they know you are dual? You would show only one or the other passport when you enter a third country. If I were in trouble somewhere in a strange land, I'd turn ... (show full quote)

What Miss Kitten was referring to, as was I, is that if you are a dual Swedish/US citizenship, you could not have problems with Swedish authorities and phone up the US. There is a convention (I can't remember which) which states that a country may always treat a citizen as if it were a sole citizen of that country for purposes of jurisdiction. In a third-party land, this obviously does not apply.

QUOTE (cogito @ 11.Mar.2012, 01:28 PM) *
As to your original question: As it stands today, dual citizenship is permitted (well, tolerated) by both the U.S. and Sweden.This could change. The current White House assume ... (show full quote)

The "tolerance" for dual citizenship is unlikely to change in a legal sense, as the current precedence for allowing it is a Supreme Court ruling that the US must allow dual citizenship because of the 14th amendment, and constitutional changes directed at reversing are pretty unlikely for all sorts of reasons. As for the tax stance, yes, the stance has always been rather hostile and this administration has been particularly gung-ho about abusing expats as much as possible.
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Kibiri
post 11.Mar.2012, 03:54 PM
Post #35
Joined: 1.Jun.2008

QUOTE (aino @ 11.Mar.2012, 12:27 PM) *
  • You can go to countries were Americans are disliked using your Swedish passport

Is there a country where you cannot enter with your American passport, but can with Swedish? Iran maybe?
Even to DPRK, where USA is the devil, you can enter with US passport.
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gplusa
post 11.Mar.2012, 04:19 PM
Post #36
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

Puffin, I was worried about the same thing. If something should happen to my family in NZ/Aus while I was in Sweden without a passport. The staff member at Migrationsverket told me that I had to send my passport in with my application, together with a printed copy of my electronic application form. They open the envelope and check that all the correct documents have been included. Then the application stands in the queue. What I could then do, and apparently it was a common practice, was to contact Migrationsverket and tell them that I was planning to travel outside of Sweden and would need my passport. I didn't have to supply any booking details etc. I could have been driving somewhere. Anyway, they would then send my passport back to me. The theory is that I was supposed to send it straight back after my "trip", but the reality was that I could hold on to my passport until my application reached the top of the pile. Then the case worker would contact me and tell me to send my passport back so that they could process my application. So you'd likely only be passportless for about a week.

I never put it to the test, but it sort of came from the horse's mouth.
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ChocOwl
post 11.Mar.2012, 04:36 PM
Post #37
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

QUOTE (Puffin @ 11.Mar.2012, 02:33 PM) *
I guess I am freaked as it says 7-9 months on the websiteIf anything happened to my mother not sure I would be prepared to wait 48 hours to travelIt's annoying as under th ... (show full quote)

When I applied for citizenship in 2004 the waiting time was about a year, and the instructions from MV were to send the application first but without my passport, then wait for instructions on when to send the passport. I sent in my application and about 10 months later I got a letter teling me to send in my passport around a certain date in two months time. I did so and got my passport and citizenship papers in the mail about two days after I sent in the passport! I guess my application was very quick to process once it had worked its way to the top of the pile.
This is similar to the suggestion by gpulsa above, should work fine. Of course, if the waiting time for processing is shorter now maybe you can trust and hope it will go quickly.
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aino
post 11.Mar.2012, 06:25 PM
Post #38
Joined: 14.Jan.2010

Puffin, application for me took 4-5 weeks too, tops. I was surprised when a registered letter I got contained my citizenship bevis. This was around spring sometime.
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Miss Kitten
post 11.Mar.2012, 06:37 PM
Post #39
Location: Kronoberg
Joined: 20.Aug.2007

QUOTE (Kibiri @ 11.Mar.2012, 03:54 PM) *
Is there a country where you cannot enter with your American passport, but can with Swedish? Iran maybe?. Even to DPRK, where USA is the devil, you can enter with US passport.

It was my understanding that any American citizen is persona non grata in Cuba.
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rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 07:14 PM
Post #40
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

Wrong way 'round. We're forbidden from travelling there by the US gov't. Lots of people go anyway via e.g. Costa Rica.
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soultraveler3
post 11.Mar.2012, 08:39 PM
Post #41
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 12.May.2009

QUOTE (Kibiri @ 11.Mar.2012, 03:54 PM) *
Is there a country where you cannot enter with your American passport, but can with Swedish? Iran maybe?. Even to DPRK, where USA is the devil, you can enter with US passport.

I'm not sure about not entering, but there are some countries that don't require Swedish citizens to have a visa to enter but US citizens have to.

We were looking to take a last minute trip to Turkey a couple summers ago and luckily, we had the travel agent check about visas. I needed a visa to enter Turkey, but my Swedish sambo didn't so we ended up going to Cyprus instead. There are probably other countries like that as well.

On top of that, there are certain countries / regions in the world were it's probably safer to travel as a "neutral" Swede than an American.
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gplusa
post 11.Mar.2012, 08:50 PM
Post #42
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

It's all worry about nothing, but I agree that a Swedish passport is less likely to draw unwanted attention in some lands than passports from other more "proactive" countries. Probably some truth in that with regard to minimising risks. It doesn't bother me too much as no one really gives a toss about a New Zealand passport holder, but I might feel different if my orginal country of origin was somewhere else.

Slightly off topic here: A few years ago I was flying from NZ to London. Midway along, during a stop over, the flight changed to be a code-share flight. It still had the same Qantas (I think) number that we had booked, but it also picked up a United Airlines flight number. We didn't know it had happened until we went to the boarding lounge to get back on the flight. That was back during the time when there was a higher risk to US flagged flights around the world. I was a bit pissed at the time that I didn't know that might flight would be sharing a UA number and I kinda think I should have been given that information (and the choice) by the travel agent at the time I was booking. In case I wanted to book a different flight instead. Nothing more than a gripe I've held in for a few years.
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rtharper
post 11.Mar.2012, 09:57 PM
Post #43
Joined: 2.Feb.2011

QUOTE (soultraveler3 @ 11.Mar.2012, 07:39 PM) *
I'm not sure about not entering, but there are some countries that don't require Swedish citizens to have a visa to enter but US citizens have to.

Indeed, many countries operate on a reciprocity basis there, so if the US doesn't have them on the visa waiver list, it probably requires a visa for a US citizen (I remember when my partner went to Brazil, he was surprised that he need a visa but UK citizens didn't, for this very reason).
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Kibiri
post 11.Mar.2012, 11:41 PM
Post #44
Joined: 1.Jun.2008

QUOTE (soultraveler3 @ 11.Mar.2012, 09:39 PM) *
I'm not sure about not entering, but there are some countries that don't require Swedish citizens to have a visa to enter but US citizens have to. We were looking to t ... (show full quote)

Turkey issues tourist visa at the airports. It is a 5 minute thing, costs something like 10 euro. It is like an entrance fee rather than a visa. EU citizens also need this entry-fee, though somehow, I don't know why, Swedish are exempt. Maybe they like Sweden because of Reindfelt tongue.gif
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Baned
post 12.Mar.2012, 04:37 AM
Post #45
Joined: 22.Feb.2009

QUOTE (DamnImmigrant @ 10.Mar.2012, 06:40 PM) *
You do not need to file American taxes if you make under a certain amount. Make more than that and you DO need to file taxes but you NORMALLY do not need to pay US taxes if yo ... (show full quote)

I haven't read up on FUBAR yet, but as for not having to file taxes if you make under a certain amount: I was advised by a gov't employee friend to always file, regardless. If you don't file, they can technically audit you for the last 3 (or 4 years) - which would be a pain in the ass regardless if all your papers are in order. Spending the extra $20 or so a year to have H&R Block file for you (and if you make no income, it's free) is well worth your peace of mind.
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