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Don't pay for Access to The Local "Stories".

As they are here for FREE

Savage
post 2.Jan.2018, 12:09 AM
Post #1
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

With The Local struggling for cash, and its ever worse articles and unrealistic representation of news events happening in Sweden.

I thought we could speed up the demise of this publication.
By reprinting their "cash for access" on their own page.
But without the need for members to pay.

This will present the owners of this page with a legal conundrum.

As while the information may be copied and reprinted, it will still remain within / on the site.

And the legal ramifications that The Local would face, if it attempts to remove users from discussing such topics. Could also be amusing to say the least.

Happy 2018.
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Savage
post 2.Jan.2018, 12:11 AM
Post #2
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

Sweden's new laws to watch out for in 2018

1 January 2018

A new year in Sweden means new and changed laws. Here are some noteworthy ones to watch out for, ranging from crime, to cars, drones, the internet and even sunbeds.

Drones, bikes and automobiles

From February a new subsidy for certain electric vehicle purchases will kick in, meaning up to 25 percent of the purchase price of electric bikes or electric motorcycles could be covered – with a cap of 10,000 kronor.


Drivers of traditional vehicles should be aware however that tax on fuel will increase, with petrol becoming 30 öre more expensive per litre, and diesel 27 öre per litre more expensive. The current Social Democrat-Green government has since 2015 had a yearly tax increase on fuel in place, corresponding to two percent above inflation.

Speaking of cars, as of February it will finally be illegal in Sweden to use a mobile telephone without a hands free device while driving, which unlike many European nations was previously not the case.

Looking to the skies, Sweden's struggle to get to grips with drones will take a new turn in February, when it will no longer be necessary to obtain a permit to fly light drones – likely a sigh of relief for those who make their living using the devices. The country's clumsy handling of the devices, treating them as a form of surveillance, has made it difficult to use them for filming, inspecting buildings, or taking professional photographs.

At the same time, to make life easier for aircraft pilots who have experienced drones interrupting air traffic in recent years, light drones will only be allowed to fly at a maximum height of 120 metres above the ground.



New privacy and stricter harassment laws

Starting 2018, the new crime of olaga integritetsintrång – illegal violation of privacy – will exist in Sweden. Break it by spreading sensitive images and information like for example naked pictures or so-called revenge porn, and you could be punished with a fine or up to four years in prison for the worst breaches.

Other examples of potential breaches include spreading images of someone in a particularly vulnerable situation like from the scene of an accident.

In further changes, the crime of harassment is to be expanded to include repeated unwanted contact through telephone, e-mail or SMS. Courts will take a position on how persistent the contact was, whether it was offensive or threatening, and what it led to for the person on the receiving end (loss of sleep, stress and so forth).


The internet and social media

As of 2018 Swedish websites can legally be asked to remove messages that clearly contain illegal threats or illegal violations of privacy.

At the other end of the spectrum, and pending approval by the Riksdag, a new law will begin meaning a person aged 13 can give consent for their data to be used by social media companies. If approved, it will kick in as of May.


Accessibility and energy assistance

In what hopefully should result in positive developments for disabled people in Sweden, from May there will be a legal requirement to improve accessibility at public-facing businesses like hairdressers, cafes and restaurants.

And for anyone looking to reduce their carbon footprint, from January 1st the subsidy for installing solar cells for individuals will increase from 20 to 30 percent of the cost.



Harsher penalties, from weapons to alcohol

The punishment for aggravated weapons crimes is set to increase in Sweden in 2018 to a minimum of two years in prison.


Laws protecting children are also due to be tightened to mean that proposing meeting a child in a sexual context will be punishable regardless of the details of the meeting.

The fine for bringing alcohol into Sweden without paying tax on it will increase to 40 percent of the tax payable as of 2018.



Changing age limits and schooling laws

Sweden is getting stricter on the use of solariums and sunbeds, setting a minimum age of 18 for anyone who wants to use them, starting from September.

And from the autumn term, 2018, it will be compulsory for children to attend pre-school at the age of six – at present attending pre-school is voluntary.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 2.Jan.2018, 12:22 AM
Post #3
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

Very interesting, however a bit flawed...

You are only causing more interest and participation for this forum, ...So why should TheLocal remove its customers...paid or not???
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Savage
post 2.Jan.2018, 12:33 AM
Post #4
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

QUOTE (Gamla Hälsingebock @ 2.Jan.2018, 01:22 AM) *
Very interesting, however a bit flawed.... You are only causing more interest and participation for this forum, ...So why should TheLocal remove its customers...paid or not???


If the business model worked, then they would not have needed to go to a paywall access in the first place.

Given the sheer loss of traffic this publication has lost in the last year or two.
Is clear evidence of the level of disdain readers have for this publication.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 2.Jan.2018, 01:48 AM
Post #5
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

Please supply verification of the alleged "traffic" loss...

That is if you can...
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Savage
post 2.Jan.2018, 10:41 AM
Post #6
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

2 January 2018

Apartments evacuated after explosion in Helsingborg

Apartments in Helsingborg, southern Sweden, were evacuated after an explosion in the early hours of Tuesday.

Police were called to the scene just before 1am and said one person was taken to hospital with serious injuries. The blast happened in a communal area of the building.

“The damages to the property are so extensive that they have decided to evacuate those who live there,” police control room officer Mikael Lindh told the TT news agency early in the morning.

Police forensic officers and the national bomb squad spent the rest of the night at the scene.

It had by 8am not been confirmed what caused the explosion.
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Savage
post 2.Jan.2018, 10:42 AM
Post #7
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

Wolf hunt starts in Sweden despite protests

2 January 2018

The wolf hunt is set to go ahead in Sweden today, after a court decided not to call off the cull.

Campaigners had appealed to the highest administrative court in Sweden less than a week before the start of the hunt. The Supreme Administrative Court has not yet decided whether or not to grant them leave to appeal, but said it would not call off the hunt at the eleventh hour in the meantime.

Twenty-two wolves are to be culled in the licensed hunt, which takes place in five counties between January 2nd and February 15th, with a limit on the number which may be killed in each county.

A maximum of two wolves may be killed in Örebro and Gävleborg, while the limit for Dalarna, Västmanland and Värmland is six.

Sweden has a total wolf population of around 355 animals, according to recent estimates, and authorities have previously said it should have a minimum of 300 wolves.

Various organizations, including the Swedish Carnivore Association, had called for the hunt to be stopped. On the other hand, organizations including the National Hunting Association had requested that it be extended.
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Uncle Fred
post 2.Jan.2018, 03:33 PM
Post #8
Joined: 16.Apr.2008

Attached Image
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Savage
post 2.Jan.2018, 07:17 PM
Post #9
Joined: 11.Mar.2016

Eight wolves shot on first day of Sweden's hunt

2 January 2018

The licensed hunt started on Tuesday.

Campaigners had appealed to the highest administrative court in Sweden less than a week before the start of the hunt. The Supreme Administrative Court has not yet decided whether or not to grant them leave to appeal, but said it would not call off the hunt at the eleventh hour in the meantime.

Eight wolves were shot on Tuesday, two of whom were found to have scabies, reports hunting magazine Svensk Jakt.

Twenty-two wolves are to be culled in the licensed hunt, which takes place in five counties between January 2nd and February 15th, with a limit on the number which may be killed in each county.

A maximum of two wolves may be killed in Örebro and Gävleborg, while the limit for Dalarna, Västmanland and Värmland is six.

Sweden has a total wolf population of around 355 animals, according to recent estimates, and authorities have previously said it should have a minimum of 300 wolves.

Various organizations, including the Swedish Carnivore Association, had called for the hunt to be stopped. On the other hand, organizations including the National Hunting Association had requested that it be extended.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 2.Jan.2018, 07:23 PM
Post #10
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

What interesting stories, I think I will pay to subscribe to see more, rather than wait for selected re-prints!!!
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Uncle Fred
post 2.Jan.2018, 07:27 PM
Post #11
Joined: 16.Apr.2008

These are Sweden's most (and least) popular ministers

The latest edition of a yearly poll measuring voter approval of Sweden’s ministers is in, and with less than a year left until the next general election in the country it provides plenty of food for thought.
The Aftonbladet poll asked Swedes to rate their government ministers on a scale from one to five. Five is 'very good', one 'very bad' and three 'approved'. And in the latest edition from the end of 2016, only five government ministers managed to achieve 'approved' rating or better.
Compared to previous editions of the same poll from 2016 and 2015 however, when only two government ministers achieved that rating, it's actually a slight improvement.
And in the current edition twenty ministers saw their rating improve, while none saw it decline, which will give the Social Democrat-Green government some cause for optimism ahead of the autumn 2018 election. Here are the best and worst performers.
Most popular
Sweden's most popular minister according to the poll is Defence Minister Peter Hultqvist, who achieved a 3.5 rating – up from 2.6 last year. That perhaps explains why PM Stefan Löfven was so keen to keep a hold of him in the face of a failed push by the opposition to launch a no-confidence motion earlier this year.
READ ALSO: No-confidence motion against Hultqvist collapses
Hultqvist was then followed by Foreign Minister Margot Wallström, arguably Sweden's most influential minister at the moment while the country holds a temporary place on the UN Security Council. She was rated 3.1 – up slightly from three the year before.
Next came Minister for Upper Secondary School and Adult Education Anna Ekström (rated three, up from 2.7 in 2016), Enterprise Minister Mikael Damberg (rated three, also up from 2.7) and Justice Minister Morgan Johansson (rated three, up from 2.5).
READ ALSO: Who Swedes want as Prime Minister in 2018
Prime Minister Löfven had an improved rating of 2.9 compared to 2016 (2.6), as did several other high-profile cabinet members like Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson, EU Minister Ann Linde and Culture Minister Alice Bah Kuhnke.

Least popular
At the other end of the spectrum, there's bad news for struggling junior coalition partner the Green Party, as their joint spokesperson Education Minister Gustav Fridolin was ranked the least popular minister. He did improve marginally though, being rated 2.2 compared to 2.1 last year.
The next least popular was Social Democrat Migration Minister Heléne Fritzon (2.3, with no previous rating as she only took on her position in 2017). Another Green Party politician, Environment Minister Karolina Skog, was the third poorest performer (2.3 compared to two in 2016), while the party's other joint spokesperson Isabella Lövin was fourth (2.4 compared to 2.2 in the past edition). The fifth worst performer was Social Democrat Minister for Employment and Integration Ylva Johansson (2.5, up slightly from 2.4).
The survey was carried out by pollsters Inizio for Aftonbladet between November 28th and December 7th, 2017. It took in the opinions of 1,732 people over the age of 16.
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Uncle Fred
post 2.Jan.2018, 07:35 PM
Post #12
Joined: 16.Apr.2008

Also in the news, Gamla Hälsingebock subscribes to The Local. Good on the old goat.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 2.Jan.2018, 11:36 PM
Post #13
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

laugh.gif
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 3.Jan.2018, 01:43 AM
Post #14
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

So, I'm asking what have you got against TheLocal???

If it is so bad why don't you pack up and go elsewhere???

I am positive that you can find peace, tranquility, comfort, interesting debates and best of all good news articles, somewhere else...

When you have found such a place, tell me and I will join you!!!
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Gjeebes
post 3.Jan.2018, 06:50 AM
Post #15
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

"Prime Minister Löfven had an improved rating of 2.9 compared to 2016 (2.6), as did several other high-profile cabinet members like Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson, EU Minister Ann Linde and Culture Minister Alice Bah Kuhnke"

Well, with this, it would seem, the ignorant Swedes get exactly what they deserve.
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