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Northern Lights in Sweden

Aurora Borealis

Lost_Zulu
post 25.Feb.2010, 05:24 PM
Post #1
Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 23.Feb.2010

I was just wondering how much of Sweden can see the Northern lights in the winter time?

I know it’s mainly the northern parts that can see them, but how far south can you go and still be able to see them?

Is it possible to see them in Stockholm or is that too far south? (or is that just a dumb question lol)

Reason is: I’d like to move to Sweden in the next few months to somewhere where you can see them, but also somewhere where I won’t struggle too much to find a job.
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BrittInSweden
post 25.Feb.2010, 05:52 PM
Post #2
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 16.May.2009

You can see them in the UK sometimes so depending on the timing most of Sweden can see them. However to see them frequently you need to be in the Northern areas.

This site is decent for what the up to date coverage is meant to be: http://www.gedds.alaska.edu/AuroraForecast/
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Furu
post 25.Feb.2010, 06:10 PM
Post #3
Joined: 16.Jan.2008

QUOTE (Lost_Zulu @ 25.Feb.2010, 05:24 PM) *
I was just wondering how much of Sweden can see the Northern lights in the winter time? I know it’s mainly the northern parts that can see them, but how far south can you go ... (show full quote)

It depends what kind of job. If you are mining you can live in Kiruna in Northern Sweden and see Northern Lights as well.
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Nemesis
post 25.Feb.2010, 10:24 PM
Post #4
Location: Skåne
Joined: 14.Apr.2009

You can sometimes see them outside Stockholm.

Best is Öusterund or more northern. Kiruna is best.

Get yourself a holiday in Piteå and you will see them.

Best is Narvik or Hammerfest in Norway.

I have saw them from Inishowen and Giants causeway in Ireland and everywhere north of Dumbarton in Scotland. Then again mum made a point of making sure we saw them as a child.

If you have a small child. It is worth making sure they are wellwrapped up and let them see them. Sammi clothes are best, just explain to the Sammi your intentions and they will dress the kid accordingly. The child and you will be in awe and remember tehm forever.
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Lost_Zulu
post 26.Feb.2010, 07:16 AM
Post #5
Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 23.Feb.2010

Thanks peeps
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Localer
post 26.Feb.2010, 09:35 AM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 27.Oct.2006

i saw them in Borlänge last year...about 2 hours from Stockholm.
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Freja
post 26.Feb.2010, 09:49 AM
Post #7
Joined: 27.Jan.2010

You can see them anywhere in Sweden - but is a rare sight in the southern part of the country. The further north and the further from a major city you got better probability and the will be/look more spectacular. From, say Sunsdsvall/Ostersund and north of there you'd be guaranteed to see a few good ones if you hang around a few weeks. Ideally you'd like to be north of the polar circle. The best I've seen - and they were truly amazing - has been up around Kiruna, well, on a mountaintop in the wilderness nearby. But you wouldn't wanna live there ;-)

Perhaps this is what has inspired you, if not, try to get this show from BBC: Joanna Lumley in the Land of the Northern Light. Love her narrating and they have managed to captured this magical fenomena in a spectacular way.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00dhv1n
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Nemesis
post 26.Feb.2010, 09:53 AM
Post #8
Location: Skåne
Joined: 14.Apr.2009

I have seen that program. It is really good. There is none of the usual patronising crap in that documentary and it is very interesting.

Actually I would live on a mountain top if I could:)

The area around Kiruna is beautiful. I have popped over to Narvik on occassion when up there.
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gplusa
post 26.Feb.2010, 10:10 AM
Post #9
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

They put on a great show for us a couple of years back when flying into Luleå on the midnight flight. Haven't seen them so spectacular since. From memory that was around late March / early April.
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Freja
post 26.Feb.2010, 10:11 AM
Post #10
Joined: 27.Jan.2010

QUOTE (Nemesis @ 26.Feb.2010, 08:53 AM) *
There is none of the usual patronising crap in that documentary and it is very interesting. Actually I would live on a mountain top if I could:)

That's what I liked also. And she came across as such a sensitive and sensible woman capable to take in what she experienced with humility and respect.

I hope you find the mountain top of your dreams one day.
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gplusa
post 26.Feb.2010, 10:15 AM
Post #11
Location: Luleå
Joined: 4.Sep.2009

It's worth taking a tour into the mine at Kiruna. Buying a burger at 1000m below ground level is a unique experience.
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Nemesis
post 26.Feb.2010, 11:19 AM
Post #12
Location: Skåne
Joined: 14.Apr.2009

QUOTE (Freja @ 26.Feb.2010, 10:11 AM) *
That's what I liked also. And she came across as such a sensitive and sensible woman capable to take in what she experienced with humility and respect.I hope you find the ... (show full quote)

I spoke to a journalist who once met her at a charity event. She apprently is very intelligent and knows her subject matters very well, as well as being very passionate about her causes.

I once tried to apply for planning permission to build a house on top of a hill (300 meter) in Donegal in Ireland. The planning people (bord planera) freaked out and people from Cork and Dublin were objecting. I actually recieved letters to my parents home in which I was accussed of being in league with the devil. I forgot that the Celts used to build hillforts in Ireland, before christianity. I do hope to try again sometime, but don´t think I would suceed in ireland. My father kept the objection letters, as he saw them as funny and shows them to everyone. My father showed them once to a priest to really annoy him smile.gif

In Scotland were I was born, the descendents of the english landowners who took the land of the Scots a few hundred years ago would object, so I can´t do it there either.

In Northern Ireland it is impossible as well. My friend tried it and got a a rejection letter saying her application was rejected in one sentence, with no reason.

I wonder if I could suceed in Sverige or Norge? It will be interesting to compare.

QUOTE (gplusa @ 26.Feb.2010, 10:15 AM) *
It's worth taking a tour into the mine at Kiruna. Buying a burger at 1000m below ground level is a unique experience.

I have never tried that. I must do so when next in Kiruna. I hope it has good meat:)
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V8farty
post 26.Feb.2010, 12:49 PM
Post #13
Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 3.Oct.2007

I saw some Northen lights in Sundsvall once.

I think it was when I hit my head on a lappost outside H&M on a saturday night. Mind you I was completely drunk at the time.
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jm77
post 26.Feb.2010, 01:10 PM
Post #14
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Mar.2009

This year has been rather grim for the northern lights. More cloud than usual and the sun is strangly dormant. You can see what has been happening this and other years at this site http://uk.jokkmokk.jp/diary.php . Good place to stay is with this lady http://www.arctic-color.com/eng/ who left an office job in England to live in lapland and photograph the northern lights.
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Nemesis
post 26.Feb.2010, 01:42 PM
Post #15
Location: Skåne
Joined: 14.Apr.2009

Good sites. Good pictures.
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