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Homoeopathy in Sweden

how acceptable is it generally?

ukshaz
post 9.Dec.2014, 10:54 AM
Post #1
Joined: 9.Dec.2014

Hi all

I am a qualified and very experienced homoeopath (amongst other things - nurse, photographer etc) and when I move to Sweden in September would like to go back to being a practising homoeopath.

I have researched on the law governing homoeopathy in Sweden, and I am able to legally practice thankfully but I am wondering just how accepted it is in Sweden as a general rule. In the UK for example, I know more and more people were turning to alternatives and compliementary healthcare methods and people were becoming much more open. However I do not know this is viewed in Sweden.

I would be grateful for any information around this.

Thanks
Sharon
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Solith
post 9.Dec.2014, 11:43 AM
Post #2
Joined: 9.Jul.2006

I think people would laugh.

Not because of closed-mindedness, but because their employer (who typically pays for health and wellness costs that the government doesn't cover) would have to approve it - and it would then have to have some kind of proven benefit for many companies to offer to pay. And why would anyone pay for something if their employer would cover the equivalent under approved treatments?

And that's beside the idea that Swedes are generally conservative when it comes to healthcare and prefer science and hospitals compared to a bottle of very over-priced water. Unless you sell it as 500ml of very expensive gym water, in which case they're all over it.
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skogsbo
post 9.Dec.2014, 11:55 AM
Post #3
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

QUOTE (Solith @ 9.Dec.2014, 11:43 AM) *
Swedes are generally conservative when it comes to healthcare and prefer science and hospitals


There is zero evidence that it works as anything more than a feel good placebo effect. The lancet in the UK looked at nearly 500 different homeopathy trials and found nothing conclusive that it helps any condition.

If other people wish to spend their own money on it, that's fine, but I hope that no taxpayers money goes on this stuff.
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LauraCristescu
post 9.Dec.2014, 12:06 PM
Post #4
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 8.Nov.2013

I don't know about Swedes, but immigrants might take you up on that. I know for instance i use propolis tincture for cold sores as they dry up the damn thing much faster than the cream i can get from the pharmacy. However i could not find that here, so i had to ask my mother to ship some over.
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LLHope
post 9.Dec.2014, 12:10 PM
Post #5
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 1.Jan.2014

QUOTE (ukshaz @ 9.Dec.2014, 10:54 AM) *
I know more and more people were turning to alternatives and compliementary healthcare methods and people were becoming much more open.
...and much more DEAD! Just ask Steve Jobs ...oh, you cannot unless you are offering mystic services also rolleyes.gif
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cherrybubble
post 9.Dec.2014, 12:27 PM
Post #6
Joined: 17.Oct.2012

QUOTE (ukshaz @ 9.Dec.2014, 10:54 AM) *
Hi allI am a qualified and very experienced homoeopath (amongst other things - nurse, photographer etc) and when I move to Sweden in September would like to go back to being a ... (show full quote)

Well, I think most people view treatment with homeopathy on par with asking Santa for an iPad or praying to jesus for a car. But unless you make house calls, one must also travel to quacks, so perhaps the more convenient thing would be for the gullible to just burn their money themselves and save on the time and expense of making the trip at all.

You're a nurse? Like...of homeopathy? Do you throw water at people? Or did you decide to forsake evidence-based medicine for the sake of fleecing the gullible?

You seem to think Homeopathy is some sort of modern therapy and equate its acceptance with open-minded thinking and progressive society. The opposite is true. Homeopathy WAS accepted when people did not know how medicines worked. They do now. Are there idiots in the western world who still believe in exorcisms and crystals, yes. Wide swathes of the US don't believe in vaccines either, but as a society, swedes tend to be fairly educated and have faith in modern medicine, not hocus pocus aura cleansing.
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yet another brit
post 9.Dec.2014, 12:27 PM
Post #7
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

"...people were becoming much more open..."

Open to what? Magical thinking? Homeopathy = placebo. End of.

Alternative medicine isn't big here, and certainly isn't regarded as "integrative medicine" that has value alongside conventional medicine. After all - what do you call alternative medicine that works? Medicine...

At best harmless (assuming no conventionally treatable underlying disease actually exists). At worst, well - have a look at the tales of homeopaths thinking they can cure Ebola.
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Solith
post 9.Dec.2014, 12:59 PM
Post #8
Joined: 9.Jul.2006

QUOTE (cherrybubble @ 9.Dec.2014, 12:27 PM) *
Well, I think most people view treatment with homeopathy on par with asking Santa for an iPad or praying to jesus for a car...You're a nurse? Like...of homeopathy? Do you ... (show full quote)



Damn guys, I was trying to be polite! But you all took it way too far. Mind you, at least she's got a clear idea of what the general consensus on homeopathy is here! biggrin.gif
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ukshaz
post 9.Dec.2014, 01:23 PM
Post #9
Joined: 9.Dec.2014

Well I dont know whether to say thanks for the replies or not ... this was only my second post here ... but judging by the tone of most of the replies, will be my last I think.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion for sure ... and maybe you are all right in how it would be viewed in Sweden if they are conservative people ... which is kind of what I expected but thought I would ask anyway ... but you did not have to be so rude in your responses. I dont expect everyone to agree with what I believe ... but there are ways of saying stuff that are not so rude

Im not going to get into an argument about whether it works or not ... as that wasnt the intention of my post ... though obviously Im in the camp that says yes it works ...but I do not try and convince anyone ever


Sharon
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ChocOwl
post 9.Dec.2014, 01:35 PM
Post #10
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

There are slow moves to incorporating some homeopathic treatment into regular healthcare.
It is however much more accepted in other countries such as Germany where regular pharmacies sell homeopathic products.

Try some industry websites for information...
http://homeopatiframjandet.se/
http://www.sns.nu/dokument/startsida.php

other info:
http://www.lakemedelsverket.se/malgrupp/Ha...en/Homeopatika/
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Rick Methven
post 9.Dec.2014, 01:51 PM
Post #11
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

I love the instant experts who just follow the line put about by the major pharmaceutical companies that homeopathy is mumbo jumbo or a placebo. Have any of you ever tried any homeopathic remedy? I was cured of a back problem by homeopathy that 12 years of trying with conventional medicine has failed to cure. I use calendula tincture for cuts and cream for dry skin. A large amount of the stuff you pay mega bucks for over the chemists counter is based on or stolen from homeopathy.

If you prefer to pay for the big bank balances of Astra Zenica et all feel free but do not knock what you do not know. Homeopathy can not cure cancer or chronic liver disease but is very effective for many common ailments.
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Solith
post 9.Dec.2014, 02:27 PM
Post #12
Joined: 9.Jul.2006

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 9.Dec.2014, 01:51 PM) *
I use calendula tincture for cuts and cream for dry skin. A large amount of the stuff you pay mega bucks for over the chemists counter is based on or stolen from homeopathy.



While that's great for you, calendula tincture is not a homeopathic remedy - it's closer to tea or pressed oils in a base, and there's no dilution - and it probably does contain compounds that helped.

But diluting a compound in water or alcohol repeatedly until there are no molecules remaining in the bottle, and then claiming it's "water memory" is really just a test of how easily an idiot and his money can be parted.
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cherrybubble
post 9.Dec.2014, 02:52 PM
Post #13
Joined: 17.Oct.2012

QUOTE (ukshaz @ 9.Dec.2014, 01:23 PM) *
Everyone is entitled to their opinion for sure

No. Science and medicine are based in facts. Not opinions. Conflating opinions and fact are why unvaccinated children are now dying of diseases that we dealt with decades ago. And don't get me started on evolution-deniers.

QUOTE (ChocOwl @ 9.Dec.2014, 01:35 PM) *
It is however much more accepted in other countries such as Germany where regular pharmacies sell homeopathic products.

This has a lot to do with the origins of homeopathy, with its roots in germany. Are there gullible people in sweden as well that believe in auras and crystals and other hocus pocus? Of course!

QUOTE (Rick Methven @ 9.Dec.2014, 01:51 PM) *
I love the instant experts who just follow the line put about by the major pharmaceutical companies that homeopathy is mumbo jumbo or a placebo. Have any of you ever tried any homeopathic remedy?

We all have an uncle Rick who has daily chats with the holy spirit too, but some of us believe a different...er ...mechanism...for his delusions. And placebo is a very very powerful effect. Some people get it from religion and some from homeopathy, but placebo has been shown to work very effectively in some ailments. Modern medicine is shown to work by having an effect better than placebo, which homeopathy hasn't been shown to have.

QUOTE (Solith @ 9.Dec.2014, 02:27 PM) *
But diluting a compound in water or alcohol repeatedly until there are no molecules remaining in the bottle, and then claiming it's "water memory" is really just ... (show full quote)

Exactly. Because lets be honest. If water genuinely had a memory, remembered everything that was every mixed into it, then all our water, whether taken as a drink or as medicine definitely remembers poop. Fish poop, human poop, dog poop, oh, and pee. Don't get me started on pee.
laugh.gif
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ChocOwl
post 9.Dec.2014, 03:05 PM
Post #14
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

There are plenty of examples in modern "scientific" medicine of pharmaceuticals that are not all they claim to be.
For example atenolol has been shown to be no better than placebo or no treatment in terms of decreasing cardiovascular morbidity and may lead to a higher risk of stroke or death compared to other blood presure medication. As far as I know there isn't a definitive answer on this issue yet, however. In the meantime...atenolol is subsidised in Sweden... Doesn't that bother anyone? Not saying that homeopathy is the answer, just want to point out that non-alternative medicine is also flawed.
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Svensksmith
post 9.Dec.2014, 03:29 PM
Post #15
Joined: 28.Jul.2011

Three years ago, my blood pressure was 160/90 and my doctor put me on blood pressure medication. It made me lethargic and I couldn't exercise properly. I took myself off of it and took a more natural approach, changing my diet, exercising more and taking supplements (one of which is called Mukta Vati, an mix of Indian herbs). My blood pressure now is now 130/70.
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