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Waldorf Schools in Sweden

Any experience?

amy boswood
post 5.Feb.2011, 11:18 PM
Post #16
Joined: 5.Oct.2010

yes i forget that it isnt just stockholm!!
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mikewhite
post 6.Feb.2011, 08:58 AM
Post #17
Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 8.Sep.2010

But I loved the way you were thinking: ooh, if you are (anywhere) in Sweden, do pop in for a coffee ! How sociable !
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englishlassie
post 6.Feb.2011, 09:39 PM
Post #18
Joined: 20.Oct.2009

Wanted to thank you for your replies. And thank you Amy for your kind offer - I may well take you up on that if we move to Sweden. I take it you are in Stockholm? smile.gif My kids do go to a Waldorf school now and I think it would make moving easier if they attended a similar school. But I do realise the school is only as good as the teachers. Which is why I am asking about experiences here. smile.gif

I am sorry to hear about your experience byke - but the headphones thing would never happen in our school, and they do take injuries seriously. I did not think Waldorf schools had headteachers though?? We are lucky to have a great school locally, and realise they are a little hit and miss. smile.gif
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byke
post 6.Feb.2011, 10:20 PM
Post #19
Location: Europe
Joined: 28.Oct.2008

Dont forget I was part of an 80's child ... and we had different schools in the 80's, back in the UK.
Are there Waldorf based bi-lingual or international run schools in Sweden? or do you plan on getting them straight into a Swedish language environment?

You hit the nail on the head in regards to every school is different.
But remember the curriculum is the same (in Sweden due to law) unless you go fully private.

Also remember that Sweden is very liberal (I sound like a yank now) and education levels in sweden is an average of 1 to 2 years behind the UK and European standard (since they also start school later in Sweden) So this can be a benefit or hinderance depending on what school you attend and what you hope s best for your children.

But again, what it all boils down to is the individuality of the school.
As they change with the seasons based on staff and children coming and going.
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*Haparanda*
post 16.Mar.2011, 05:19 PM
Post #20


QUOTE (Puffin @ 5.Feb.2011, 09:00 AM) *
I looked at a Waldorf school for my child who is autistic - but decided in the end not to do it as my child need more structure that Waldorf offers - also the Waldorf resident ... (show full quote)

I know this post is a bit old. I just like to underline the point been made in this previous post. If you have a autistic child you should think twice if you consider the Rudolf Steiner school. I was recommended it, because they have a holistic approach to autism. They do have a very different approach to autism. So different that they think they know better than the psychiatrist who diagnosed my daughter. Even though they have had very little experience with it.
An example is that she is recommended structure. Steiner focuses on free play - a lot. The kids develop through free play. And that is probably true when it comes to "normal" kids, but for autistic kids, this free play can be very stressfull. My daughters teacher shows very little understanding for this. My daughter gets bullied almost everyday. She tries to walk away from it, but they chase her. If the teacher sees it, she explains to my daughter why she gets bullied...
Needless to say Im looking for a better school.

I know this is one particular case, and autistic children are also different. I talked with the psychiatrist about Steiner schools, and she says - your kid actually have to be very high functioning and independent, otherwise they are lost in these schools.
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*swemom*
post 20.Mar.2013, 01:08 AM
Post #21


checking in...any updates, did you choose waldorf and if so are you happy? We are moving across the globe partly to get back to my swedish family and partly to be able to afford waldorf for our kids, as its very expensive where we live now!! we are applying to the ones in stockholm and hope to get our oldest in this fall!!
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Puffin
post 20.Mar.2013, 01:09 PM
Post #22
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

There is a Swedish Federation of Waldorf schools that lists the schools affiliated to the federation - although not all are
http://www.waldorf.se/
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Puffin
post 20.Mar.2013, 01:12 PM
Post #23
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

QUOTE (Haparanda @ 16.Mar.2011, 05:19 PM) *
I know this post is a bit old. I just like to underline the point been made in this previous post. If you have a autistic child you should think twice if you consider the Rudo ... (show full quote)

The residential Waldorf school for autistic boys has been reported several times for excessive physical force and punishment used against pupils

However my child is now flourishing in a highly academic free school
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