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Child in school, the only non-swedish, not include

what options do we have

ToSheila
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:00 PM
Post #1
Joined: 26.Jul.2017

Hej,

Our child started with Swedish elementary school in September.

Unfortunately, language barrier (hopefully it is only that!), is giving us (the parents) and him lots of headache. He is not included in the games,in the class, teachers do not know what to do, he sits in the classroom by himself.

Completely opposite of what it should be. He is the only non-Swed in the classroom.

Does anyone know what are our rights, if any, to resolve this situation, and not de-list him from this school and go to international only.

We went for Swedish only school thinking that it will be best and fastest possible way to integrate him into the system -- what is happening now is complete segregation, on several levels.

Thanks!
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Bsmith
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:12 PM
Post #2
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

My wife and her brother moved to Sweden when she was 8 and he was 10. They knew no Swedish. All they could do was grunt and make gestures to the other kids. They learned Swedish very quickly.

We moved to Sweden when our daughters were roughly the same age. They also learned Swedish very quickly because they wanted to fit in. Great motivation.

It may be difficult for him initially, but I would recommend that you stay the course. Things can turn around rapidly once he gets it into his mind that he wants to learn Swedish.
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Svedallas
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:19 PM
Post #3
Joined: 21.Apr.2016

QUOTE (ToSheila @ 30.Oct.2017, 11:00 PM) *
Hej,Our child started with Swedish elementary school in September. Unfortunately, language barrier (hopefully it is only that!), is giving us (the parents) and him lots of ... (show full quote)


If you want your child to integrate into Swedish society, they must be in a Swedish school, and Swedish language school.
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ToSheila
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:21 PM
Post #4
Joined: 26.Jul.2017

Thank you, Bsmith, for these words. Deep down we know that this period will pass, and that they would be accepted, fully, in the classroom.

My thinking was what can be done, from School side, to additionally help him, he is 10 years old. If there are mechanism we want to know about it and ask the School.

TIA!
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:27 PM
Post #5
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

Motivate your child to learn Swedish...You seem to be looking for ways to make exceptions and want to change how things are to suit you...

That can only be detrimental to your child and his/your life in Sweden...

Sweden won't change for you!!!
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ToSheila
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:36 PM
Post #6
Joined: 26.Jul.2017

Gamla Hälsingebock, thank you -- maybe you are right; maybe we, as parents, are too subjective in this matter and overprotective to our child.

But this "subjectivness" does not exclude us from possible mechanism within Swedish School System which can help him in this, fragile years for his social skills.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:45 PM
Post #7
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

He is young and will adapt, encourage him, children can turn around and be totally different...Just don't give him the idea that everyone will change to suit him...

And by the way if he is the only non Swedish child in a Swedish country and a Swedish school...What did you expect???
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ToSheila
post 30.Oct.2017, 11:59 PM
Post #8
Joined: 26.Jul.2017

Of course that we will not give him idea that we can re-configure as per his need environment where he goes to school, but if we can fine tune it, with some mechanism from School System, please do share that knowledge.

"What we expected???"

We expected, as probably all people in similar situation, that teachers and parents would do that little effort to help new-kid-in-class in his new environment, in *same* way we did when newcomer arrived in our old school.

Not calling only him on birthday parties is little bit more detrimental to the child than trying to help him in beginning. Don't you think???

Simple as that.
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Cheeseroller
post 31.Oct.2017, 01:02 AM
Post #9
Location: Germany
Joined: 10.Apr.2007

Our son moved to Sweden when he was 7 years old. He was put into a pre-school class so he could learn Swedish - other SE kids were 6 yo. 8 years later he is obviously fluent and in gymnasium studying for a technical career.

3 years ago, we moved to Germany. It was a disaster for him. He simply could not handle learning another new language, and the school was totally unsympathetic to his needs. He moved back to Sweden just 16 yo and lived by himself. He refinished SE school and is now in a gymnasium scoring top of the class marks.

What I learned from this experience, is not to move kids older than 7 or 8 to a new country. It's too difficult to learn not only a new language but a new culture. I also learned that the brainwashing in Swedish schools is so powerful that even if you are immigrant parents, you are unable to influence the way your kids think.
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Bsmith
post 31.Oct.2017, 11:43 AM
Post #10
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

I am not sure that age 7 is a hard and fast number. As I posted before, both my wife and youngest daughter were age 8 and they caught on fast. My brother-in-law and my oldest daughter were age 10 and it was a bit more difficult but they did manage. My oldest daughter actually became quite popular for helping her classmates with English. All concerned learned to love living in Sweden.

As parents, we hate to see our kids struggle, but these struggles often strengthen our children's character in ways we cannot imagine. Be as supportive and encouraging as you can and, hopefully, in a few months time this will be a non issue.
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Svedallas
post 31.Oct.2017, 11:48 AM
Post #11
Joined: 21.Apr.2016

QUOTE (ToSheila @ 30.Oct.2017, 11:59 PM) *
Of course that we will not give him idea that we can re-configure as per his need environment where he goes to school, but if we can fine tune it, with some mechanism from Sch ... (show full quote)


Keeping your child in an English school, will hinder how to understand Swedish, especially when you need it. It will isolate them.

Children learn language much faster than adults. It is tough love for them, but it is for the better. What you should do is enroll you child in a class where the teacher is patient.
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artisan_se
post 31.Oct.2017, 03:04 PM
Post #12
Joined: 9.Jul.2015

my son is here for almost 2 y. and still doesn't have one friend. He sits alone with mobile at brakes and calls internet his friend. The school is all swedish. he tried to make friends but told me that kids are spoiled have no manners and are vulgar
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Tenacious185
post 31.Oct.2017, 04:13 PM
Post #13
Joined: 4.Aug.2017

Pardon my ignorance on this topic - but do Swedish schools really just accept kids who speak NO Swedish into their classrooms and let them struggle with no support? How can they be expected to learn or understand any of the lessons? Obviously all children need to be in school, and if they come from a foreign country and move to Sweden then of course, that dilemma will be there - but are there not tutors provided by the school to teach Swedish to the newcomers? Or do they receieve any extra instruction outside regular classroom hours? Again, I'm sorry that I have to ask all this...but I've never heard of a school just accepting a kid that can't understand a word, and having no plan in place to help them adjust.
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flaneur
post 31.Oct.2017, 04:33 PM
Post #14
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 19.Aug.2017

QUOTE (Tenacious185 @ 31.Oct.2017, 04:13 PM) *
Pardon my ignorance on this topic - but do Swedish schools really just accept kids who speak NO Swedish into their classrooms and let them struggle with no support? How can th ... (show full quote)


I love Sweden!

Damn, now when you put it like that, trying to pull off the rational point of view, I can't help but think how cool this country is.
I love the "nobody cares" way of dealing with life here. No sarcasm, I'm serious.

This country is so damn cool!
You either find your way or go back where you came from. Literally - nobody cares. wub.gif

Back on topic - good luck with your kid!
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Tenacious185
post 31.Oct.2017, 04:44 PM
Post #15
Joined: 4.Aug.2017

QUOTE (flaneur @ 31.Oct.2017, 04:33 PM) *
I love Sweden!Damn, now when you put it like that, trying to pull off the rational point of view, I can't help but think how cool this country is.I love the "nobo ... (show full quote)


That’s certainly true enough. I’ve definitely grown a thicker skin since moving here. I haven’t progressed as far as I had hoped with the language, or the fitting in, but then it occurred to me...it’s not that important to me. I enjoy solitude and limited interaction with others. I guess to a kid, that might be tougher, though.
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