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Can I buy iso gas canisters at Kiruna?

Kungsleden trail in late September

leok17
post 28.Aug.2015, 06:00 AM
Post #1
Joined: 28.Aug.2015

Hello.
This is Sigeol from Korea.

I am planning to go to Kungsleden trail from Sep. 25th to Oct. 2nd.
Our course will be from Nikkaluokta to Abisko.
I am a little worried about our plan because every STF huts will be closed before our trailing.
Here are some questions that I can't solve by web-surfing...

1. Can I buy iso-butane canisters at Kiruna?
My stove uses gas and I heard STF huts usually sell gas canisters.
BUT they will be closed...
I have to buy gas before the enter to trail paths... and I'm not sure that super-market in Kiruna sell it or not...
If not... It can be huge problem to me...

2. How cold will be in late Sep. ?
I will bring my tent but if it's too cold, I will sleep at STF hut's emergency room.
I've googled a lot but it's the only information about Kungsleden in Sep.

http://www.codyduncan.com/2010/06/hiking-t...rail-in-autumn/

If you have any information, please let me know.
Anything is OK.

3. Because the bus between Kiruna and Nikkaluokta will stop when STF huts are closed,
I have to take a taxi between Kiruna and Nikkaluokta.
I heard it's possible to take a taxi at Kiruna train station to Nikkaluokta.
Is it easy to find a taxi from Nikkaluokta to Kiruna if I change my trail plan to opposite?
I mean from Abisko to Nikkaluokta.

Any tips will be valuable for me.
Thanks.
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Temp
post 28.Aug.2015, 06:17 AM
Post #2
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 14.Jun.2006

Hi Sigeol, you can buy the camping gas you need in Kiruna - there's a couple of sports shops that sell it, for example Intersport in the city centre.
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Temp
post 28.Aug.2015, 07:08 AM
Post #3
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 14.Jun.2006

Temperature wise, expect it to be quite cold. Here's the average statistics for Abisko:

http://www.yr.no/place/Sweden/Norrbotten/A...statistics.html

and you can plan on it being colder than that as you're higher up when hiking and add in any wind and the almost guaranteed rain/snow (have good waterproofs...). I'd plan for some snow falls and bad weather - and be happy on the sunny dry day you may get (true winter and summer )


Nikkaluokta is a very very small Sami village with only one road to it (from Kiruna) - there will be no passing taxis. you might be able to call a taxi from Kiruna to pick you up from Nikkaluokta when you get a phone signal, but it will be a wait, they may not want to come, and nothing in Nikkaluokta will be open the time you are there: http://www.nikkaluokta.com/index.php?id=1511

I always prefer to go Nikkaluokta to Abisko - I always find Tj?ktja pass is easier that way too as you go up the steep part and down the less steep part, and at Absiko you hit a road with a bus service on it (not regular) as well as the train. Additionally, Abisko turistation is open all year round, so you can get a nice room, bed, sauna, food at the end of the hike.


Here's the route I took start August this year (from Vakkotavarre to Abisko - I'm by Singi, that you reach from the east on around day 3):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nS6K1JR_HA

You can see the trail is pretty much in the valleys except for Tj?ktja pass so typically as long as you are not climbing too much you are not getting that lost. If ti snows it might be a little hard to see the summer trail, but in early october, might be a little too wet to follow the winter trail (the red crosses on poles), so I'd also suggest taking walking poles with you to test ground ahead.

Saying all that, you might be lucky and have 6 days of sun and relatively warm weather - in which case I will be eternally jealous!

This is what the trail looked like at start of August this year going from Vakkotavarre to Abisko:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajt/albums/72157657439593689

(and in winter (start April) it looks like this: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajt/albums/72157651775995102 )



If you're comfortable hiking in remote areas with no support (110km hiking with no roads except at start and end, very few people, no mobile connection) with potential for poor visibility due to weather then you'll have fun. I'm sure you know/have researched the basic safety rules: http://www.fjallsakerhetsradet.se/eng/6-ti...the-mountains-/

Have fun.
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leok17
post 28.Aug.2015, 07:58 AM
Post #4
Joined: 28.Aug.2015

Re: Hi Sigeol, you can buy the camping gas you need in Kiruna - there's a couple of sports shops that sell it, for example Intersport in the city centre.



It's very helpful to let me know the exact store 'name'.
I found the exact loacation by Google map.
Many thanks!!
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leok17
post 28.Aug.2015, 08:36 AM
Post #5
Joined: 28.Aug.2015

OMG You are very kind!
Thank you very much!!
Your detailed explanations about wether are very helpful. Thanks.

You mean I have to choose between summer and winter trail depends on the weather, right?

I really want to make you eternally jealous!! ( 6 days of sun smile.gif )
Hopefully, nice weather!
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Temp
post 28.Aug.2015, 09:42 AM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 14.Jun.2006

My pleasure.

Most of the time the winter and summer trail run together and when not, they're usually not much more than 100m apart.

The summer trail is marked by stones on the ground painted in rose (orange/pink) and these can be some distance apart - but if you can see the ground you can usually work out where to go; the winter trail are marked by red crosses on poles about 1.5-2 metres high at pretty regular intervals.

In some places/weather the winter trail is going to be easier to see...but it often goes over lakes/rivers/bog land and so often unreliable to walk on.

I'd suggest stick to the summer trail as much as possible, but be prepared to follow - or perhaps better said to track - the winter trail if you need navigation help - maybe it's foggy, or heavy precipitation that hides the view, or perhaps snow has fallen hiding the orange paint on some stones.

One place I remember from this summer that was little tough to see summer trail was on the north side of Tj?ktja pass where it is a large 3x1km sized field of rocks (dumped there in the las ice age). Trying to spot the weather worn orange dots painted on the side of a rock hidden amongst all the other rocks (or under the unmelted snow fields) was a small but not impossible challenge - but it was easier there to track the winter "red crosses on poles" a while until the summer trail was easier to find. On the other hand on the south side of Tj?ktja pass (the uphill part if going north) it's much better to stick to the summer trail and avoid the winter trail on the hill as the terrain is tough.


Most important is to have a good map as it will show you where the trails run together and where they split (where you should try and stick as close to summer trail as possible). Intersport will have the map too if you haven't got one.


One other thing to mention is be aware of sunset/sunrise times; when it's dark with no moon/stars it's very dark up there - if you get the stars and moon then it's magical, such a clear view of the milky way!

Here's a site that gives the sunrise/set times

http://www.suncalc.co.uk/place.aspx?id=2727664

e.g. for 1 October, sunrise is 06:00, sunset is 17:00, so it's going to start begin dark around 16:00 on a clear day (that site doesn't take account of the fact that the clocks go back one hour end of september)
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Temp
post 28.Aug.2015, 09:46 AM
Post #7
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 14.Jun.2006

...and one more thing :-)

In each hut you pass there will be a book that you can (should) enter your name into, where you came from (last hut) and the direction (next hut) you're going.

That way, if the unthinkable happens, then the search team know the last place you went through and where you didn't get to - probably the difference between your life and death in a rescue situation.
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manindemaan
post 15.Sep.2015, 06:17 PM
Post #8
Joined: 28.Jul.2015

QUOTE
One place I remember from this summer that was little tough to see summer trail was on the north side of Tj?ktja pass where it is a large 3x1km sized field of rocks (dumped there in the las ice age). Trying to spot the weather worn orange dots painted on the side of a rock hidden amongst all the other rocks (or under the unmelted snow fields) was a small but not impossible challenge - but it was easier there to track the winter "red crosses on poles" a while until the summer trail was easier to find. On the other hand on the south side of Tj?ktja pass (the uphill part if going north) it's much better to stick to the summer trail and avoid the winter trail on the hill as the terrain is tough.

My experience of that part is that it doesn't really matter whether or not you can see the trail markings. There are mountains to the left and mountains to the right, you cannot really go wrong... For me it was better to walk around patches of snow rather than trying to stick to some painted rocks.
There is a river on the northern side of the pass, west of the track (i.e. to your left when walking south to north), with at some point a bridge and the STF hut. Just make sure not to cross the river by accident, but around that time it should not be covered with snow.



When following the winter trail (normally I would say DON'T !) be careful as it indeed crosses lakes and rivers under the assumption those are completely frozen.
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skogsbo
post 16.Sep.2015, 07:13 AM
Post #9
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Some good trail advice above. On top of that, carry a small compass. If the cloud is properly in and you can't quite see the line to follow or much of your surroundings, across say the boulder fields, then a trend in the right direction will solve things for you, even if you are following a precise bearing.

Daylight; it's disappearing fast. Obviously have a reliable head torch, but also a spare. Start early, it is better to get up whilst still a little dark and head off sharpish, than try to finish the day in the dark when legs and mind are tiring.
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leok17
post 18.Sep.2015, 07:26 AM
Post #10
Joined: 28.Aug.2015

Your tips about trail course will be very helpful.
Thanks ALL!!! biggrin.gif

I will buy a map, a compass and bring good lanterns.

I have one more question about trail course.
I heard that bridges will be disassembled after summer.
Thus certain passes will be not passible...

Will it be OK from Nikkaluokta to Abisko about bridge matter??
I also sent a mail to STF for asking this metter but if you have any knowlege, please let me know.

Thanks!! ^^
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manindemaan
post 18.Sep.2015, 08:20 AM
Post #11
Joined: 28.Jul.2015

Big bridges will be there all the time, smaller ones might be disassembled or destroyed (seems like many get destroyed every winter...).
But the northern part looked okay to me. There are some streams where you might have to walk through water or jump from stone to stone, depending on rain/snow melting (but the latter won't be a problem for you).
Hiking poles can be useful, and following the usual rules: don't take off your shoes (but consider taking of socks and take out insoles), open the hip- and chestbelt of your backpack (you want to be able to get it off quickly should you fall - it's hard to stand up with a heavy backpack on your back), try to find an easy(er) spot to cross streams, wait a day if the water is too high.


When you bring a compass make sure you know how it works. Often, maps have some explanations at the back (at least fjallmappen), or you could ask in outdoor stores when buying one. Try it out at home (outside obviously, but in a save environment)
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Temp
post 1.Oct.2015, 02:52 PM
Post #12
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 14.Jun.2006

Signal - just wondered if you went and already made it out of the fj?llen - if still there, sounds like you get to experience Swedish fj?ll weather in full power tonight (hard winds and potential snow):

http://www.aftonbladet.se/nyheter/article21505632.ab
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