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The Local _ Jobs _ Australian Moving to Sweden?

Posted by: straya01 23.Nov.2017, 07:17 PM

Hey guys..

So im here in australia in our messy summers, 40C heat and its not even summer yet
Looking very foward to a messy winter..
I met a girl here from sweden, and im coming over on a holiday visa next year around april/may to stay for a year and maybe more depending on the situation.

Im just wondering about employment?
Ive heard multiple storys here, off some of the swedish girls saying ill be fine getting work (been in hospitality for a while now, and quite experienced in the term the Hardware side of IT(no quals though)), and then i read that its extremely hard if you dont speak swedish?

Im trying to stay open minded as much as possible about moving.. Ill have enough money to survive for a while there.. Is there anything i should know, tips etc about coming?
Really looking foward to the move and the experiences it will bring(AND THE COLD!!!), just cant get out of my head finding some sort of employment.

Thankyou all in advance smile.gif

Posted by: Gjeebes 23.Nov.2017, 10:21 PM

"Is there anything i should know, tips etc about coming?"

OMG...dude...turn around, and run...

Chances are the "girl" has no f'ing clue what a messed up place Sweden is, for her, and for foreigners. Your only hope is to drink the cool-aid, and accept that you will in all likelihood waste years of your life here, getting nowhere.

I know it sounds harsh, but dude, you are coming to a world of pain, that is so completely not worth it.

You are unlikely to get a decent job. You are unlikely to get a decent rental contract, and you are unlikely to have friends beyond the "girl's" own social circle, which is likely smaller than an ant. You are likely to find Swedes extremely boring, unless hanging with non religious "church" types is your thing.

Come for the year, have your fun, and then promptly leave.

If actually she loves you, she should have already insisted that you shouldn't come here.

Posted by: Bsmith 23.Nov.2017, 11:50 PM

The job situation can often be grim. It can take several years to find a job. If you plan to come and give it a try (and you will never know until you do) bring enough money to last, learn Swedish as fast as you can and have an exit plan in place in case you find Sweden is not to your liking.

Posted by: Svedallas 24.Nov.2017, 12:15 AM

QUOTE (straya01 @ 23.Nov.2017, 07:17 PM) *
Hey guys..

So im here in australia in our messy summers, 40C heat and its not even summer yet
Looking very foward to a messy winter..
I met a girl here from sweden, and im coming over on a holiday visa next year around april/may to stay for a year and maybe more depending on the situation.

Im just wondering about employment?
Ive heard multiple storys here, off some of the swedish girls saying ill be fine getting work (been in hospitality for a while now, and quite experienced in the term the Hardware side of IT(no quals though)), and then i read that its extremely hard if you dont speak swedish?

Im trying to stay open minded as much as possible about moving.. Ill have enough money to survive for a while there.. Is there anything i should know, tips etc about coming?
Really looking foward to the move and the experiences it will bring(AND THE COLD!!!), just cant get out of my head finding some sort of employment.

Thankyou all in advance smile.gif


Expect to wait at least a year to get a job.
Unless you have some specialist skill.

Posted by: Cheeseroller 24.Nov.2017, 04:01 AM

Bring vitamin D3 + K2 tablets. You won't see the sun...:-)

Posted by: jackstraw 24.Nov.2017, 11:31 AM

I generally agree with Gjeebes sentiments

Though, how much do you know about running coffee shops?

You could aim for a job in someplace like drop coffee or Johan nyqvist.

Posted by: Gjeebes 24.Nov.2017, 12:38 PM

"Unless you have some specialist skill."

But keep in mind, even a PhD in pizza creation, will not help you. : )

Posted by: Svedallas 24.Nov.2017, 12:40 PM

QUOTE (Gjeebes @ 24.Nov.2017, 12:38 PM) *
"Unless you have some specialist skill."

But keep in mind, even a PhD in pizza creation, will not help you. : )


Fair point.
Depends on your personal goals.

If you want to do foodora food delivery, you don't even need to speak or have any qualification.

Posted by: wallace1837 24.Nov.2017, 01:49 PM

Get a round trip ticket...

Posted by: Tenacious185 24.Nov.2017, 01:57 PM

Haha, you poor guy. Asking for advice on this forum can often be like facing a firing squad…and many of the posters here have very strong opinions about Sweden, most of them negative. ;-)

If I may offer an opposing view, I came here three years ago, not speaking a word of Swedish, not having a partner, dragging only two suitcases through the snow on a dark January night, having left sunny California where it was 30 degrees the day I took off. I had a little bit of savings, but no real plan, no job lined up - nothing. I basically moved here “for the hell of it”. Seriously. It was a whim. I was coming to study, sure, but why Sweden? I could have done that anywhere. But why NOT?

Fast forward to today, and life has worked itself out. I have a good job, a partner (despite my best efforts to stay single because I was done with that shit) a nice place to live, friends (despite my best efforts to also be socially avoidant, because…I kind of am…) and I’m about as happy as a cynical asshole like me can possible be. I really do like Sweden (except I find Stockholm too crowded for my liking) and I really wish I had done this a long time ago. I feel like I wasted way too many years living in a country and a culture that I never really fit into, despite being born there. Sweden isn’t for everyone, but I guess you won’t know until you try. If you want to be happy here, and to succeed here – it’s well within the realm of possibility if you set your mind to it.

The fact that you will have a one year visa allows you to “test the waters” as they say, and see how it goes. If at the end of that year you like it here, the relationship with the girl is still good, you’ve found work, etc., then you can consider the long term. If not, well no harm done. You lived abroad for a year, gave it a shot, and that’s that. If you decide not to stay, at least you’ll have had the adventure. ;-)

Posted by: SmokerT69 24.Nov.2017, 02:40 PM

I've been here for 6 months and had 3 jobs offers but none of them will hire me until I finish SFI. So... start learning Swedish.

Posted by: Gjeebes 24.Nov.2017, 04:07 PM

QUOTE (Tenacious185 @ 24.Nov.2017, 01:57 PM) *
Haha, you poor guy. Asking for advice on this forum can often be like facing a firing squad…and many of the posters here have very strong opinions about Sweden, most of them negative. ;-)

If I may offer an opposing view, I came here three years ago, not speaking a word of Swedish, not having a partner, dragging only two suitcases through the snow on a dark January night, having left sunny California where it was 30 degrees the day I took off. I had a little bit of savings, but no real plan, no job lined up - nothing. I basically moved here “for the hell of it”. Seriously. It was a whim. I was coming to study, sure, but why Sweden? I could have done that anywhere. But why NOT?

Fast forward to today, and life has worked itself out. I have a good job, a partner (despite my best efforts to stay single because I was done with that shit) a nice place to live, friends (despite my best efforts to also be socially avoidant, because…I kind of am…) and I’m about as happy as a cynical asshole like me can possible be. I really do like Sweden (except I find Stockholm too crowded for my liking) and I really wish I had done this a long time ago. I feel like I wasted way too many years living in a country and a culture that I never really fit into, despite being born there. Sweden isn’t for everyone, but I guess you won’t know until you try. If you want to be happy here, and to succeed here – it’s well within the realm of possibility if you set your mind to it.

The fact that you will have a one year visa allows you to “test the waters” as they say, and see how it goes. If at the end of that year you like it here, the relationship with the girl is still good, you’ve found work, etc., then you can consider the long term. If not, well no harm done. You lived abroad for a year, gave it a shot, and that’s that. If you decide not to stay, at least you’ll have had the adventure. ;-)

It's a nice story, but there is a tone of "settling" woven in there...and besides, would you really trust someone who looks like this?



Posted by: Bsmith 24.Nov.2017, 04:33 PM

QUOTE (Tenacious185 @ 24.Nov.2017, 12:57 PM) *
Haha, you poor guy. Asking for advice on this forum can often be like facing a firing squad…and many of the posters here have very strong opinions about Sweden, most of them negative. ;-)

If I may offer an opposing view, I came here three years ago, not speaking a word of Swedish, not having a partner, dragging only two suitcases through the snow on a dark January night, having left sunny California where it was 30 degrees the day I took off. I had a little bit of savings, but no real plan, no job lined up - nothing. I basically moved here “for the hell of it”. Seriously. It was a whim. I was coming to study, sure, but why Sweden? I could have done that anywhere. But why NOT?

Fast forward to today, and life has worked itself out. I have a good job, a partner (despite my best efforts to stay single because I was done with that shit) a nice place to live, friends (despite my best efforts to also be socially avoidant, because…I kind of am…) and I’m about as happy as a cynical asshole like me can possible be. I really do like Sweden (except I find Stockholm too crowded for my liking) and I really wish I had done this a long time ago. I feel like I wasted way too many years living in a country and a culture that I never really fit into, despite being born there. Sweden isn’t for everyone, but I guess you won’t know until you try. If you want to be happy here, and to succeed here – it’s well within the realm of possibility if you set your mind to it.

The fact that you will have a one year visa allows you to “test the waters” as they say, and see how it goes. If at the end of that year you like it here, the relationship with the girl is still good, you’ve found work, etc., then you can consider the long term. If not, well no harm done. You lived abroad for a year, gave it a shot, and that’s that. If you decide not to stay, at least you’ll have had the adventure. ;-)



It's nice to hear from someone who has had a different experience...it kinda balances everything out. I actually enjoyed my "adventure" in Sweden but only stayed for 14 months. I did find a job but not in my field and not at a salary level that was sustainable in the long run and I did not feel like starting over again...so I moved back home. However, your experience may be different. Never know until you try...

Posted by: Tenacious185 24.Nov.2017, 04:50 PM

QUOTE (Gjeebes @ 24.Nov.2017, 04:07 PM) *
It's a nice story, but there is a tone of "settling" woven in there...and besides, would you really trust someone who looks like this?



Where did you get that picture of me just waking up with no make-up and no filters!?

Posted by: Tenacious185 24.Nov.2017, 08:13 PM

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 24.Nov.2017, 04:33 PM) *
It's nice to hear from someone who has had a different experience...it kinda balances everything out. I actually enjoyed my "adventure" in Sweden but only stayed for 14 months. I did find a job but not in my field and not at a salary level that was sustainable in the long run and I did not feel like starting over again...so I moved back home. However, your experience may be different. Never know until you try...

I hope you are happy where you are now. I think I have a weird sort of resilience that maybe comes from some previous experiences that were not ideal. I think my perspective of what constitutes a bad situation is different from the average person who lands in Sweden and feels disconnected and depressed. I’ve seen worse, so I’m actually about as happy as I can get here. I guess it will be different for everyone.

Posted by: Bsmith 24.Nov.2017, 11:15 PM

QUOTE (Tenacious185 @ 24.Nov.2017, 07:13 PM) *
I hope you are happy where you are now. I think I have a weird sort of resilience that maybe comes from some previous experiences that were not ideal. I think my perspective of what constitutes a bad situation is different from the average person who lands in Sweden and feels disconnected and depressed. I’ve seen worse, so I’m actually about as happy as I can get here. I guess it will be different for everyone.


I am, thank you. There is no perfect place so (unless you live in North Korea or some other hellhole) make the best of it...or, if you are truly unhappy, move to someplace you like better. Life is too short to waste on an unhappy situation. That includes jobs, marriages, locations, etc. Good for you that you have found Sweden to be to your liking.

Posted by: straya01 25.Nov.2017, 12:57 AM

Thankyou all for your inputs, negative or positive.
I honestly dont mind in the term of employment, if i am delivery pizzas, driving a dump truck, or shoveling snow.. really would not bother me as i reckon it would all be apart of the experience.
As for the winters, i hear everyone say "its so dark, you're gonna get depressed inside and be a crab blah blah"
Life is similar for me like that anyway as i usually work nights and sleep days anyway, except i gotta have a fan and no blankets lol.
The girl im with still lives with her family in stockholm, so it wont be too expensive to sleep and eat, just more so, so i can sustain money and go see things, drive around the close by countries like im unable to do here, fly to russia blah blah, untill i work out what i want to do in the long run as im still young.

Also had a friend who went to norway, couldnt speak norweigian and got a job at the bar and did really well? Maybe i will get lucky.

Posted by: Tenacious185 25.Nov.2017, 01:32 PM

QUOTE (straya01 @ 25.Nov.2017, 12:57 AM) *
Thankyou all for your inputs, negative or positive.
I honestly dont mind in the term of employment, if i am delivery pizzas, driving a dump truck, or shoveling snow.. really would not bother me as i reckon it would all be apart of the experience.
As for the winters, i hear everyone say "its so dark, you're gonna get depressed inside and be a crab blah blah"
Life is similar for me like that anyway as i usually work nights and sleep days anyway, except i gotta have a fan and no blankets lol.
The girl im with still lives with her family in stockholm, so it wont be too expensive to sleep and eat, just more so, so i can sustain money and go see things, drive around the close by countries like im unable to do here, fly to russia blah blah, untill i work out what i want to do in the long run as im still young.

Also had a friend who went to norway, couldnt speak norweigian and got a job at the bar and did really well? Maybe i will get lucky.


You might be onto something, actually, that nobody talks about too much regarding the whole “long, cold, dark winter thing”...

Immediately prior to moving here, I worked graveyard shift, 1900-0730 for 13 years. I had always been “nocturnal” prior to that, and kept the same schedule even on vacations and days off. I suspect night owls and night workers who are well adjusted to being in the dark, actually thrive in the Nordic countries.

I can’t sleep in the summer here. It’s too damn bright. But I love the winters.

Posted by: kiwibird 29.Nov.2017, 10:51 AM

QUOTE (Gjeebes @ 23.Nov.2017, 10:21 PM) *
"Is there anything i should know, tips etc about coming?"

OMG...dude...turn around, and run...

Chances are the "girl" has no f'ing clue what a messed up place Sweden is, for her, and for foreigners. Your only hope is to drink the cool-aid, and accept that you will in all likelihood waste years of your life here, getting nowhere.

I know it sounds harsh, but dude, you are coming to a world of pain, that is so completely not worth it.

You are unlikely to get a decent job. You are unlikely to get a decent rental contract, and you are unlikely to have friends beyond the "girl's" own social circle, which is likely smaller than an ant. You are likely to find Swedes extremely boring, unless hanging with non religious "church" types is your thing.

Come for the year, have your fun, and then promptly leave.

If actually she loves you, she should have already insisted that you shouldn't come here.


I disagree completely with this sentiment.

I came from New Zealand in January this year, on the same visa OP is looking to come on - and found it not as hard as people make out - IF you are proactive. I didn't have a girlfriend when I arrived, so stayed in a hostel - found an apartment on Blocket.se, searched for work on all the job sites and reached out stating my situation - that I have a temporary personal number and bank account (which you can get on the working holiday visa) and socialised enough to meet some friends and their friend groups (Ironically I met them in a bar while I was with an Australian). I found an apartment, work and friends by being active in the search. It would be incredibly easy to arrive and sit on your hands and do nothing - but if you are prepared to put in some effort you will be fine.

Also disagree with the idea that swedes are boring - I have been travelling over summer with some of my friends that I met in january and we had a great time.

OP, it's not as easy as getting a job at the local cafe at home and hanging with your friends from childhood, but if you are up for a challenging but fun time - make the move! I don't think you would regret taking a chance and in the worst case scenario having to move back home - best case scenario - who knows!

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 30.Nov.2017, 09:29 PM

I also came from NZ, but in Feb. Found a job as a chef in 4 months, at a nice mansion that is recommended in the White Guide. I still speak no Swedish, never went to SFI or anything. Everyone speaks English. I do constantly hear the "you must learn Swedish!" like they think it's so easy to instantly learn a new language at 30 years old. Maybe I'm just too dumb. I don't understand why people say "Swedes are boring". Maybe boring attracts boring? Or just meeting the wrong people. I like all the people I meet, people of all ages. I guess everyone has a different experience, but I really doubt you'll have a horrible time here like the negative nancies did.

Posted by: TLSucks 1.Dec.2017, 12:18 AM

QUOTE (Mistress_Of_Doom @ 30.Nov.2017, 09:29 PM) *
I also came from NZ, but in Feb. Found a job as a chef in 4 months, at a nice mansion that is recommended in the White Guide. I still speak no Swedish, never went to SFI or anything. Everyone speaks English. I do constantly hear the "you must learn Swedish!" like they think it's so easy to instantly learn a new language at 30 years old. Maybe I'm just too dumb. I don't understand why people say "Swedes are boring". Maybe boring attracts boring? Or just meeting the wrong people. I like all the people I meet, people of all ages. I guess everyone has a different experience, but I really doubt you'll have a horrible time here like the negative nancies did.


One should not really pay attention to the losers on this forum. Unfortunately, instead of being a forum where people can get help with everyday issues and meet people, it has become the playground for a few loud-mouthed individuals with far too much time on their hands (at least they found each other). One should remember that 99% percent of the expats are not on this forum, simply because they are happy with life and have real stuff to do.

Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 1.Dec.2017, 02:49 AM

Exactly!!!

A good post, people happy with their Sweden experience rarely post here...

The posts of the people who have failed in Sweden and most likely failed at "home" too, dominate this forum...

Pay no heed to them, may they leave Sweden and be happy elsewhere, although it is doubtful they could ever be satisfied, anywhere!!!

Posted by: gplusa 3.Dec.2017, 03:39 PM

Yet another New Zealander. Been living here for 12 years and wouldn't change a thing. My advice: Don't come here with an attitude. It's for you to adapt to Sweden, not for Sweden to adapt to you.

Respect the culture and at least make an attempt to learn the language, you'll be surprised by the respect you get back in return.

Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 3.Dec.2017, 04:08 PM

Spot-On!!!

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 4.Dec.2017, 07:49 AM

I guess it's fairly easy for a NZer to adapt here. The whole "anti-social" thing doesn't bother me at all, since that's who I am already. In fact, Swedish people are more social than I am. I mostly walk with my head down and strangers still say hello to me. There may be a big difference between city and rural folk though, as I know a NZer living in Stockholm and absolutely hating it.

Posted by: Svedallas 4.Dec.2017, 10:19 AM

QUOTE (gplusa @ 3.Dec.2017, 03:39 PM) *
Yet another New Zealander. Been living here for 12 years and wouldn't change a thing. My advice: Don't come here with an attitude. It's for you to adapt to Sweden, not for Sweden to adapt to you.

Respect the culture and at least make an attempt to learn the language, you'll be surprised by the respect you get back in return.


Well said.
Gamla is right, the ones who are here moaning, are the ones who have failed...and are miserable.

Your attitude and will determines your fate in Sweden.
But culture and language are the most important!

Posted by: wallace1837 4.Dec.2017, 11:03 AM

QUOTE (Svedallas @ 4.Dec.2017, 10:19 AM) *
Well said.
Gamla is right, the ones who are here moaning, are the ones who have failed...and are miserable.

Your attitude and will determines your fate in Sweden.
But culture and language are the most important!

In fact it is your ethnicity: https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=MIG_EMP_EDUCATION. Don't believe me, just check the data.

Posted by: Svedallas 4.Dec.2017, 01:09 PM

QUOTE (wallace1837 @ 4.Dec.2017, 11:03 AM) *
In fact it is your ethnicity: https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=MIG_EMP_EDUCATION. Don't believe me, just check the data.


This is one of the miserable ones...

Posted by: wallace1837 4.Dec.2017, 03:06 PM

QUOTE (Svedallas @ 4.Dec.2017, 01:09 PM) *
This is one of the miserable ones...

Living in the reality makes it miserable in Sweden...

Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 4.Dec.2017, 05:01 PM

Whose reality???

Reality is in the eyes of the beholder...

What you see is what you get...

If you keep looking for the monster under the bed, in a while it will become your reality...

Posted by: wallace1837 4.Dec.2017, 05:30 PM

QUOTE (Gamla Hälsingebock @ 4.Dec.2017, 05:01 PM) *
Whose reality???

Reality is in the eyes of the beholder...

What you see is what you get...

If you keep looking for the monster under the bed, in a while it will become your reality...

Check the OECD data! It is not "whose reality". It is measurable discrimination observed by a third party. This is as good as its get in therm of reality.

Posted by: Svedallas 4.Dec.2017, 05:35 PM

QUOTE (Gamla Hälsingebock @ 4.Dec.2017, 05:01 PM) *
Whose reality???

Reality is in the eyes of the beholder...

What you see is what you get...

If you keep looking for the monster under the bed, in a while it will become your reality...


+1 Yup!

And people take their "own reality" wherever they go...
Doesn't matter which country they live. They take their problems with them.

Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 4.Dec.2017, 05:45 PM

Amen!

Just wondering about former complainers here, that have moved out of Sweden...

Are they happy in their new surroundings???

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 5.Dec.2017, 06:48 AM

I think a lot of people don't like or fear change. They feel more safe and comfortable doing mundane things like they've always done, in their own country they know and grew up in. See the same people, watch the same tv, life on autopilot like a zombie. That's the only reason I can think of, why some people would absolutely hate this country so much.

Posted by: Cheeseroller 5.Dec.2017, 10:44 AM

People who fear change don't emigrate. But when you have lived longer than 2 years in Sweden, are fluent in the language, really understand the culture, and have experienced the glass ceilings that exist, perhaps you will understand why for some people moving to another country or returning home would be a better choice. For many, I suspect they don't have the financial resources or are trapped because they have children, and just have to suck it up - this applied to 90% of foreigners we met.

As one example, look around and try to find successful foreign owned companies, beyond those offering cleaning services, taxi's, take away food. In the UK and Germany, Canada or the USA, you will find a lot. Also, when Expressen or Aftondagbladet prints a list of the highest tax payers in Sweden for 2017, try to find one foreign name.

Posted by: Bsmith 5.Dec.2017, 11:25 AM

If you are looking for a quiet, peaceful life with little stress and lots of solitude, Sweden may be for you. If you are looking for wild, crazy excitement...probably not.

Posted by: Gamla Hälsingebock 5.Dec.2017, 02:37 PM

There is a mystique about Sweden, it gets a lot of worldwide attention and has a great reputation...It is a prime example of the "grass is greener" legend.

People move there because they expect to find a utopia and are devastated to find that it is not, they are not happy and feel cheated...So they come here to vent, some do it properly and others do it unfairly...

Had they properly researched Sweden before they moved, this forum would be almost empty...

Posted by: Cheeseroller 6.Dec.2017, 12:42 AM

...probably because they are love migrants and believe the BS told by their Swedish partner, who if course has never faced discrimination.

If you look at the forum in Germany, apart from the odd gripe, expats seem pretty content with their lot and the forum is more engaged, with meet up groups and interesting discussions. But probably most moved for work, did their research, learned the language and if anything the Germans are petrified of being considered racist and do give foreigners a real chance, if they are competent and pay their taxes. Plus many small foreign owned businesses there.

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 6.Dec.2017, 03:18 PM

I guess I am a "love migrant" but I don't feel stuck or very out of place here. I happily left NZ because I felt like I was stuck doing the same boring stuff and getting nowhere, in small city Hamilton, not learning or progressing much because everyone are happily being sheep. Yes I did move here for a lovely Swedish man, but my reasons go way beyond something so simple. Here in Sweden I get a fresh start, and not knowing anyone gives me a great sense of freedom. I love how time seems to run more slowly here. It used to frustrate me how much road rage there is in NZ, everyone are impatient and toot their horn freely. Another issue is all the smelly homeless people in NZ that are just unavoidable. Here I've seen beggars, sure, but not yet a single homeless person. As for racism, I'm 100% Asian and have not yet felt any discrimination here based on my ethnicity. Let's face it, no country is perfect, there are good and bad things about every country, but I think it's unfair to make Sweden out to be this hellhole that people should avoid.

Posted by: Gjeebes 7.Dec.2017, 07:12 AM

A common theme for the people who have this faux loyalty to Sweden, as foreigners, is that they came here, to run away from something at home, and are happy to become invisible (and from what I gather, they tend to be somewhat anti-social).

I'd say that is quite telling about the foreigners who are so blindly pro Sweden. They get their dark closet to hide in, and then feel they owe Sweden some debt of gratitude, and get upset, when others don't tow the party line? Did I get that right?

Is that why you so conveniently look past all the shit in Sweden?

Others of us don't come to Sweden to become Swedish, to become invisible, or to run from anything. We come here for work, grow our careers, live our lives and expect to have the same chances as any of the locals, especially when one has the same or higher qualifications.

Finding the glass ceiling is irritating as hell and does come as a surprise in country that seems to be (emphasis on the "seems" part) all about fairness, openness, and equality. And Sweden as a multi-culti...fuck sakes, don't make me laugh. And then to be told that their is no glass ceiling, by the locals, as you are held back, and watch the Svens, who can barely tie their shoelaces, be promoted to positions with huge amounts of responsibility, yet whom are fully incapable! Gimme a break!

I have lived in places that don't pay to fake their image, don't claim to be the world's "goodest" country, or any of the other bullshit Sweden pretends it is the King of, that have a much fairer system, all things considered, and much more opportunities.

Also interesting is how people are offended when someone doesn't buy into the same shite as they do. People here, who get upset at other people, who have had a terribly shit deal in Sweden, don't "get it", because they say to themselves, "well, everything is fine for me, what's that guy on about?". So small minded! Just like the ones that can't appreciate the shit deal of a homeless person, because they are "stinky" (what are we all stuck in high-school now)?

And for the record, there are loads of homeless in Sweden. There are loads of drug addicts in Sweden. There are loads of prostitutes in Sweden. There is loads of fraud in Sweden, there is loads of inequality in Sweden, and there is a SHIT LOAD of suicide and general misery in "envy of the world" Sweden, by Swedes, etc etc etc. They have just been photo-shopped out of the glossy pamphlet that is the PR bullshit Swedish "brand".

The same people here, who "don't get it", are the same people who will have arguments about "their" sports team, that is much much better than "your" sports team. The same people that say "Chrysler is shit, Ford is best" or also, and equally pointless, "Ford is shit, Chevy is best"...whatever.

This is the mentality of the defenders of Sweden! The words "artificial" and "shallow" come to mind.

And then we have here the most lowly, most pathetic of all, the Gamla "arm-chair-expert" types, who've never even lived here, yet have an opinion on everything about the place. Even offering advice for people asking about "should I live in this hood or that hood", as if he would actually know anything about what he is talking about!

Yes, one of the most sensitive "Swedo-warriors" on this forum, is presumably a man, who has NEVER lived here, yet spends time on a daily basis, making shit posts, about nothing!

So far, I have yet to find a compelling argument that Sweden really is such a great place, over and above everywhere else. After living here, and also having lived there, I just can't find it. Saying it is "no hell-hole" because one can no longer see or smell the homeless, just doesn't cut it. And then we have the whole other game of those who've got nothing more to say than, "well if its so bad, why did you come here (as if to imply one had a premonition prior to arriving showing what it is really like)", or "why don't you leave then".

I mean really, is that all your little peanut brains can muster?

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 7.Dec.2017, 10:10 AM

First of all, I did come to Sweden for career advancement and I have found a respectable job. Even before I met my man I had already decided and saved up enough money to give it a try. Secondly, my examples were just my way of explaining that even NZ, usually advertised as this paradise, isn't perfect at all, hence why I said no country is perfect. Of course I can only speak from personal experience, but I'm not purposefully overlooking the shitty side of Sweden to be delusional. Fact of the matter is I'm doing just fine so far and there are others doing just fine. I'm not angry at those who hasn't had a good time here, quite frankly I don't care, but to tell everyone else that Sweden is just DANGER GET OUT WHILE YOU CAN is just as immature as you're making me out to be. I also didn't know there are people here with strong opinions but have never been to Sweden. That is a little strange.

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 7.Dec.2017, 10:15 AM

Also I have no shame in admitting that I'm antisocial. I don't hide who I am, not even behind a computer screen.

Posted by: wallace1837 7.Dec.2017, 10:18 AM

QUOTE (Gjeebes @ 7.Dec.2017, 07:12 AM) *
A common theme for the people who have this faux loyalty to Sweden, as foreigners, is that they came here, to run away from something at home, and are happy to become invisible (and from what I gather, they tend to be somewhat anti-social).

I'd say that is quite telling about the foreigners who are so blindly pro Sweden. They get their dark closet to hide in, and then feel they owe Sweden some debt of gratitude, and get upset, when others don't tow the party line? Did I get that right?

Is that why you so conveniently look past all the shit in Sweden?

Others of us don't come to Sweden to become Swedish, to become invisible, or to run from anything. We come here for work, grow our careers, live our lives and expect to have the same chances as any of the locals, especially when one has the same or higher qualifications.

Finding the glass ceiling is irritating as hell and does come as a surprise in country that seems to be (emphasis on the "seems" part) all about fairness, openness, and equality. And Sweden as a multi-culti...fuck sakes, don't make me laugh. And then to be told that their is no glass ceiling, by the locals, as you are held back, and watch the Svens, who can barely tie their shoelaces, be promoted to positions with huge amounts of responsibility, yet whom are fully incapable! Gimme a break!

I have lived in places that don't pay to fake their image, don't claim to be the world's "goodest" country, or any of the other bullshit Sweden pretends it is the King of, that have a much fairer system, all things considered, and much more opportunities.

Also interesting is how people are offended when someone doesn't buy into the same shite as they do. People here, who get upset at other people, who have had a terribly shit deal in Sweden, don't "get it", because they say to themselves, "well, everything is fine for me, what's that guy on about?". So small minded! Just like the ones that can't appreciate the shit deal of a homeless person, because they are "stinky" (what are we all stuck in high-school now)?

And for the record, there are loads of homeless in Sweden. There are loads of drug addicts in Sweden. There are loads of prostitutes in Sweden. There is loads of fraud in Sweden, there is loads of inequality in Sweden, and there is a SHIT LOAD of suicide and general misery in "envy of the world" Sweden, by Swedes, etc etc etc. They have just been photo-shopped out of the glossy pamphlet that is the PR bullshit Swedish "brand".

The same people here, who "don't get it", are the same people who will have arguments about "their" sports team, that is much much better than "your" sports team. The same people that say "Chrysler is shit, Ford is best" or also, and equally pointless, "Ford is shit, Chevy is best"...whatever.

This is the mentality of the defenders of Sweden! The words "artificial" and "shallow" come to mind.

And then we have here the most lowly, most pathetic of all, the Gamla "arm-chair-expert" types, who've never even lived here, yet have an opinion on everything about the place. Even offering advice for people asking about "should I live in this hood or that hood", as if he would actually know anything about what he is talking about!

Yes, one of the most sensitive "Swedo-warriors" on this forum, is presumably a man, who has NEVER lived here, yet spends time on a daily basis, making shit posts, about nothing!

So far, I have yet to find a compelling argument that Sweden really is such a great place, over and above everywhere else. After living here, and also having lived there, I just can't find it. Saying it is "no hell-hole" because one can no longer see or smell the homeless, just doesn't cut it. And then we have the whole other game of those who've got nothing more to say than, "well if its so bad, why did you come here (as if to imply one had a premonition prior to arriving showing what it is really like)", or "why don't you leave then".

I mean really, is that all your little peanut brains can muster?

+1

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 7.Dec.2017, 11:35 AM

At the end of the day, I don't consider Sweden to be the best country in the world, nor had I always dreamed of moving here because I thought it was some kind of Utopia. I only came here knowing that Sweden has some of the best restaurants in the world, and I'm an aspiring pastry chef. Everyone goes to France but I didn't want to be like everyone else. It could just as easily have been Denmark, or I could have been just as happy living in Canada. I would love to travel to Japan but the fastpaced lifestyle and crowded spaces just isn't for me. Me loving my life has nothing to do with Sweden, but who are you to tell someone not to try something just because you didn't like it.

Posted by: Bsmith 7.Dec.2017, 02:23 PM

Glad it's working out for you.

Posted by: Gjeebes 7.Dec.2017, 03:00 PM

Well...MEOW!

"who are you to tell someone not to try something just because you didn't like it"

It isn't about what I "like" and "don't like". It is about telling people how things are here.

Everything good for you? Great. Tell people.

I find things here, for me, are quite lacking, on many fronts. And to your surprise, so it would seem, so do many, many others. And Sweden possesses a "backwards-ness" that I never could have imagined possible. Just read some of the threads in this forum if you don't understand.

So, "who am I" to tell someone to try elsewhere? Someone who, having gone through the wringer here, repeatedly, feels obliged to "warn" people about how Sweden really is.

And my point about being anti-social was not a comment of your personal merit. You have an extremely thin skin. The point was rather that it seems to me the people who defend Sweden the most, are anti-social, and therefore, seem to be somewhat more "sheltered" from the reality of Sweden's dark underbelly, since such types are less likely to be fully engaged in the society.

Posted by: gplusa 7.Dec.2017, 08:56 PM

Wow. You take a few months away from the forum and come back to find a new reincarnstion of the resident "it's all Sweden's fault" drop kick. We 've seen your lot come and go before, and yet we're all still here. We'll see you out as well. I love my Swedish life, as do the majority of people here. it has to be killing you that you couldn't make it.

Posted by: Gjeebes 7.Dec.2017, 09:30 PM

Haha! Who says I didn't make it?

And Luleå? Oh ya baby! One of "goodest" Sweden's many arseholes!

Do enjoy!

Posted by: Cheeseroller 9.Dec.2017, 02:46 AM

Well MoD, good that you are happy. Long may it continue. My sister emigrated to NZ with her family 15 years ago, live 1 hour north of Wellington. They had a rough few years adapting and missing home, but are all settled now - though I think most of their friends are expats. They have travelled around and sent photo's of the incredible nature. She seems to have gone native and now for some years has some sheep :-)

Posted by: Cheeseroller 9.Dec.2017, 03:10 AM

As you quite rightly say, no country is perfect. It's a question of finding one where you feel comfortable and it meets your needs. Having said that, Sweden has more layers than an onion. The culture is different from other Western countries, more obtuse, more difficult to understand. But if someone likes a calm life, appreciates solitude and nature, and like you, it allows you to develop your career - why not? I had no idea that there were World class pasty chefs in Sweden - I would have thought France or Belgium - at least as a layman looking at the dismal cakes on offer at most Swedish bakeries.

Gjeebes is a bit shrill at the moment, he leaves next month. He's disappointed with the time and effort he invested in Sweden only to discover the glass ceilings. I felt the same before I left, it's not as if any research would have helped - back in 1998, this forum didn't exist. I hope he finds peace and the his ambition is rewarded his next country.

This forum has always been a place for newbies to ask basic questions and others to vent. Unfortunately, it is rare to hear from those who are happy with their lot, and who have lived in Sweden for more than 5 years. There are no role models or mentors who help the newbies who struggle onto the next level.

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 10.Dec.2017, 12:05 AM

I gave up on the arguments because they were going nowhere. But thanks for the support. I can understand if someone has put in a lot of effort and got nothing back, kind if like a one-sided relationship. I don't think I've suffered any hardship here in Sweden. That's why I feel like others could also have a good time here. Sweden isn't famous for their pastry per se, but there are some restaurants that are top 50 in the world. Even so many that aren't top 50 but put so much care and attention to detail in everything they do. Not to mention, coming from half way around the world I wanted to learn new techniques and work with ingredients I'd never even heard of before. I'm not talking about your general run of the mill bakery kind of pastry. Pastry/patissiere is a broad term that includes plated desserts. I've been given the opportunity to invent my own desserts to go on the menu and I've received nothing but positive feedback. Working in Sweden also has the added bonus of learning to think more eco-friendly. We have our own vegetable, herb and flower gardens that we harvest fresh and straight onto a plate. I am loving the natural side of Sweden, and the fact that you're close to the water everywhere you go. I intend to go ice fishing some time when it is suitable. For the average person, "Swedish cuisine" doesn't mean very much, but for a chef it opens up a world of possibilities.

Posted by: Mistress_Of_Doom 10.Dec.2017, 12:27 AM

Ok so I kind of rambled on, but I get excited when I talk about food. Particularly desserts, there's just something so intriguing about using science to make edible art. There's a kind of skill you acquire through some trial and error, and just knowing how something will or should turn out. You also achieve consistency by accuracy of measurements, something that a regular chef rarely has to worry about because they can change and adjust their sauces up until the last minute.

Posted by: rex 11.Dec.2017, 03:02 PM

QUOTE (Cheeseroller @ 9.Dec.2017, 03:10 AM) *
This forum has always been a place for newbies to ask basic questions and others to vent. Unfortunately, it is rare to hear from those who are happy with their lot, and who have lived in Sweden for more than 5 years. There are no role models or mentors who help the newbies who struggle onto the next level.


I have lived for more than 5 years in Sweden. It can be a terribly infuriating place to live.

1. There are glass ceilings everywhere, and some doors are welded shut on the same floor.

2. At the same time, if you're Western European or native English speaker you should do well here. The Swedes adore Americans and Germans, and would bend backwards to satisfy them. However see #1.

3. Immigrants from other parts of the world, even from other parts of non-Western Europe, are seen as pests. The things that I hear about Poles and Syrians make me sick in the stomach.

Those are the three golden rules of Sweden, according to me. If you're a strong career person then I'm afraid Sweden might not be for you, because you'll always be an outsider. Hell, I've even been told that in my face multiple times by "PC"-Swedes. If you let it get to you, it limits your social life, your career, and your already limited opportunities to become a contributing member society.

At the same time, if you understand your place in the society here, and are happy with what you've got, then you should do well. It depends on your perspective.

Posted by: greasenipplegunnage 4.Apr.2018, 12:54 PM

To swing this conversation around, I'm also in the same boat as OP. Planning on making the move in September!

I was curious, I currently work in marketing for a bank (primarily digital, i.e. Google AdWords, Facebook Ads etc). I have my Bachelor's in Business Marketing, have been in the work force off of my internship for a year and have this delusion that I can use my degree/skills anywhere in the world because my field of work isn't necessarily language/location restricted.

In saying that, is there much demand for someone like myself in Sweden? A qualified, young, creative professional from Aus?

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