The Local is not responsible for content posted by users.
  Reply to this topic

Your computer keyboard

Be aware of the differences

Hisingen
post 10.Jul.2012, 02:12 PM
Post #1
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

QUOTE (entry @ 10.Jul.2012, 03:46 AM) *
All you need to do is change the language settings and your laptop will have all the letters and symbols of a Swedish Keyboard. . . . . . .

Sorry, but it is not quite as easy in fact. Agreed you can change the language settings, but you do not have the same number of keys on a US or UK keyboard, and unless you put stickers on those keys that exist you will not find ÅÄÖ in a way that makes typing in Swedish easy. You require that external Swedish keyboard - THEN and ONLY THEN - will you be free to type those extra symbols at will. The same applies for any country and language, they are almost all different. It is not just QWERTYUIOP, more is the pity.

Attached Image

The enclosed attachment will demonstrate more than words
Keyboards shown here, however, do not show the later 'Windows' keys.
Go to the top of the page
+
Bender B Rodriquez
post 10.Jul.2012, 02:50 PM
Post #2
Joined: 25.Mar.2006

It is simple to map any key to any place, so if you want you can just let your American keyboard be and then map åäö to your favourite positions. Personally, I have left the Swedish layout for the American since the keys are better placed for programming. On a Mac I simply use Alt-a, Alt-u a, Alt-u o to type å, ä and ö.
Go to the top of the page
+
Kibiri
post 10.Jul.2012, 02:54 PM
Post #3
Joined: 1.Jun.2008

QUOTE (Hisingen @ 10.Jul.2012, 03:12 PM) *
You require that external Swedish keyboard - THEN and ONLY THEN - will you be free to type those extra symbols at will.

I freely press the [ key on the US keyboard at will, and produce the å letter - likewise I can ö and ä. You may worship me by sacrificing kittens.
Go to the top of the page
+
Johno
post 10.Jul.2012, 02:54 PM
Post #4
Joined: 23.Jul.2008

Not too helpful since the diagram shows UK and Swedish keyboards to have the same number of physical keys. More vital is to know that the Swedish keyboard requires use of the AltGr key to get the third row of characters on the number keys. (Wait until you see a Swedish keyboard for the first time and want to use the @ key.) And that many more keys than just the letters move around and finally also find that there are dead accent keys to figure out how to use. (On a real Swedish keyboard).
Go to the top of the page
+
Hisingen
post 10.Jul.2012, 05:09 PM
Post #5
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

I agree that nothing is impossible, and that the required symbols can be achieved, but if you wish to type Swedish at a normal rate then with the input language set to Swedish and an external Swedish keyboard everything is so much easier.Years back I used a UK keyboard with stickers on keys for ÅÄÖ, but the other keys caused problems and slowed me down no end. Also, as has been noted, symbols that are common, brackets round and square, colons and semi colons etc. simply are not in the same place, and with a changed language input these are in different places. Hence the use of an external keyboard is, to be honest, the only true solution for efficiency. I never stated that that things are not possible, only that they are not practical, and with a Swedish keyboard costing from 98:- and up you have the easiest of solutions. but for anyone wanting to use their laptop per se it is worth bearing the problem in mind. For computer nerds there is no such thing as impossible, but for the average user - why make things more difficult??

And Johno - the keyboards shown are taken from the MS DOS 6 handbook from the Stone Age, hence they are just a trifle out of date, but nevertheless they do illustrate the situation to a degree. But they are of assistance when I work in German, and change to the German keyboard, for symbols not shown on my Swedish one. The handbook shows 19 different keyboards, not including those having Cyrillic characters, and was no doubt accurate when DOS 6 applied. We have come quite a bit along the way since then. How many remember the old true floppies, and why the hard disk is still referred to as Drive C:\ and not A:\ Now it is Clouds that apply ! ! !
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 10.Jul.2012, 06:46 PM
Post #6
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Doesn't seem like a hardship to me, to type on an english keyboard with SE option selected. If typing in English, but perhaps throwing in a Swedish place name, like our address, I'll often just use the ASCII code.

As for floppy yeah, did my A level computer studies course using double sided, double density floppy(super cool in those days), sadly the machines were BBC64k so hardly blasting along! Or even my ZX81 with 16k memory, those were the days. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
+
Willy
post 10.Jul.2012, 08:12 PM
Post #7
Joined: 10.Jul.2005

QUOTE (Hisingen @ 10.Jul.2012, 05:09 PM) *
I agree that nothing is impossible, and that the required symbols can be achieved, but if you wish to type Swedish at a normal rate then with the input language set to Swedish ... (show full quote)

If you actually look at the keys when typing at normal rate, you normal rate must be rather slow!
Go to the top of the page
+
skogsbo
post 10.Jul.2012, 09:22 PM
Post #8
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Perhaps he is the fastest 2 finger typist in Sweden?
Go to the top of the page
+
Leonie
post 10.Jul.2012, 10:08 PM
Post #9
Location: Jämtland
Joined: 10.Oct.2005

I am confused why is this so hard?? both in myiPhone and my lapto, I just switch languages I don't need a sticker on my laptop I just know where he äöå are My laptop.
Go to the top of the page
+
as8
post 10.Jul.2012, 10:19 PM
Post #10
Location: Malmö
Joined: 17.Oct.2010

I agree. I have both layouts configured and just hit ALT-Shift to toggle between them (works in Ubuntu and Windows).
Go to the top of the page
+
Snood
post 11.Jul.2012, 08:48 AM
Post #11
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

Yup, very easy for me. At work I use a UK layout keyboard with the UK layout in windows (much nicer than the US layout in my opinion) and because it's a UK keyboard, it has the same number and physical layout as the Swedish mapping so i can switch with alt+shift to the Swedish layout when i need to write in Swedish, I just know where åäö are.

when I write a Swedish word within English text, if it requires å,ä or ö then i just do the change without looking as if it were a normal part of typing and switch back again with relative ease. sometimes i forget so that if i need an apostrophe or a colon then end up with thisÖ itäs annoying sometimes.
Go to the top of the page
+
entry
post 11.Jul.2012, 09:42 AM
Post #12
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 1.Jul.2007

I have no problem switching between Swedish & English on the various keyboards that we utilize. I actually prefer the compactness of a laptop keyboard and the touchpad. I do not consciously know where all the keys are but my fingers know.
Go to the top of the page
+
HannahSwain
post 11.Jul.2012, 10:11 AM
Post #13
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 8.Apr.2012

As a blind typer, I still can't get used to the different keyboard layout when I use a Swedish keyboard with Swedish regional settings. So I either use an American keyboard at home, or a Swedish keyboard with US international settings at work.

å = right-alt + w
ä = quotes + a
ö = quotes + o
ø = right-alt+ l (for when Norwegian stuff comes up)

Easy peasy - and I can type in Swedish just as fast as the Swedes.
Go to the top of the page
+
Hisingen
post 11.Jul.2012, 12:56 PM
Post #14
Joined: 5.Jul.2012

QUOTE (skogsbo @ 10.Jul.2012, 06:46 PM) *
.. .. ..As for floppy yeah, did my A level computer studies course using double sided, double density floppy(super cool in those days), sadly the machines were BBC64k so hardl ... (show full quote)

The BBC - yes, that brings back memories. Plug-in programs that gave instant action, use of an external solid-state memory. In many ways that machine was before its time, and perhaps gave rise to thoughts that have resulted in the current SSD of today. Since it was not available for other than UK usage, ÅÄÖ had to be programmed onto other keys. The Commodore and the ZX were contenders when I was looking for my first computer, but the BBC Pro or 128 or whatever the 'higher' level was called won the day. It was in use for a long time before I graduated to a PC 286 for which I bought a 250MB HDD - for £225. Those were the (expensive) days. 250MB - never fill it in a month of Sundays! Nowadays a single program would hardly fit on it.

On the keyboard subject, though, I bow to the 'expertise' of the 'specialists' here. They are so worldly wise as to know everything, it seems. But to the average user, things are not that simple. Even the experts might well have to think when getting away from the actual alphabet and into the various other symbols that are literally dotted about on the keyboard in a truly varying form that has little similarity between the countries. Using my Swedish keyboard, and switching between Swedish, UK and US input, and the ALT GR key I produced a document which showed more clearly the variations, which were even more noticeable. But then of course the 'experts' know all about that, and know exactly which keys to press without even looking at them - - I doubt that very much. That is unless they are Poker experts and can remember each and every variation and combination that exists.
My intention with this OP was purely to point out the risks - and what is an easy solution for desk use. Quite clearly I stepped on a few toes in the so doing, but who cares? Maybe someone who is less knowledgeable computer-wise will have benefited by a little bit of help. Yes the keyboards illustrated were old, but that was all I had available to illustrate the major differences. But judging from the many comments in these Fora (Latin plural of Forum) the use of a spell-check would not be amiss. Those expert fingers do not always hit the right keys - no matter what.
And on that happy note . . . . cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
+

Reply to this topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members: