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Moving question, visas and stay in Sweden

emn884
post 20.Sep.2007, 04:39 PM
Post #1
Joined: 14.May.2007

I have posted before on taxation, and that is all settled now however I am now in the process of getting my visa.
I have a few questions, I will be living with my girlfriend and therefore applying for a visa based on relations but I also have a job
Offer pending my visa. I was told to submit my letter with my application as it could help speed things up.

One of my questions is, am I allowed to apply for a work visa and a residence visa at the same time? I know residence visa allows me to work as well, or so I was told, but work visas are much faster to attain (ie 2 months compared to 6). I have also heard mixed things on being allowed in the country while the papers are being processed. The consul in NYC told me yes, the one in St Louis told me no… so im a bit confused. They had said after my interviews occurred it was fine to leave.

Also if anyone knows any ways to speed things up, please let me know smile.gif tack !
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emn884
post 21.Sep.2007, 03:07 PM
Post #2
Joined: 14.May.2007

bump smile.gif
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Dakyras
post 21.Sep.2007, 03:19 PM
Post #3
Joined: 16.Sep.2005

QUOTE
I know residence visa allows me to work as well, or so I was told


I am almost certain that those from outside the EU cannot assume that. I think they are separate. Whilst a work visa would give residence rights I do not think a residence permit necessarily gives working rights.

Don't ask us though! Ring Migrationsverket.
QUOTE
I have also heard mixed things on being allowed in the country while the papers are being processed. The consul in NYC told me yes, the one in St Louis told me no… so im a bit confused. They had said after my interviews occurred it was fine to leave.


Nope, not until you are given your permits.
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emn884
post 21.Sep.2007, 04:51 PM
Post #4
Joined: 14.May.2007

Thanks for your help. I actually contacted them to see if i could just apply for both and see which comes in quicker wink.gif hehe.

If anyone knows any tips to speed it up outside of showing them the job offer, let me know smile.gif
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24/7
post 27.Sep.2007, 08:06 PM
Post #5
Joined: 23.Sep.2007

Personal experience taught me that there is JUST NO WAY to speed up the process here...in the nicest posible way, Sweden is a nation obsessed with bureaucratic red tape and procedure - it's just the way it is!

Anyway, I came here initially on a relationship and was given 12 months' probationary residence permit. The relationship didn't last (thankfully! she wasn't The One) - so when my perimt was up, I renewed my permission to stay based solely on my (by then full-time!) work position.

Bizarrely they gave me a 5 year permit (!)

So if anything, I'd suggest you get the permit based on your job and not the relationship. There are sadly many instances where the reality of emigration places too great a strain on the relationship, whereas the job is often easier to keep hold of.

Think though - is the job permanent or fixed-term contract? Many employers offer a 6 month (yes, half a year!) probationary period.

Good luck!
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emn884
post 28.Sep.2007, 05:45 PM
Post #6
Joined: 14.May.2007

Initially I believe like many jobs it is a probationary period. I have not received my official letter in the mail though, so I have yet to see how it is written. The system to even ask questions seems to be riddled with problems and lengthy queues, the time frame to call at US consulates is usually one random hour each day... so I am glad to have that part complete at least.

Thanks for the advice
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Tennin
post 29.Sep.2007, 12:01 AM
Post #7
Joined: 4.May.2007

When I applied for my resident visa based on relation(aka: Sambo visa), they the L.A. Swedish Consulate told me that it includes the work permit.
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PeeWee
post 29.Sep.2007, 05:37 AM
Post #8
Joined: 19.Jul.2007

My husband applied for a residency permit back in 2004 (at the end of the year), based on relations - we got married just before he applied at the consulate in NYC.

He is on disability, so a work permit was redundant, but he still got one with the residency permit (once it went through).

Speeding it up, well, then you would have to have a spouse who is seriously ill and who can't take care of him/herself without your help.

He got his residency permit in October 2005...

Right now we are in the process of applying for an extension of his residency permit (they grant you a 2 year period to begin with) and it has proven to be a lot more difficult than we thought.

First off, I called them up two months before hubby's permit was going to expire - it helps to do it in good time, right?

I talked to one woman at Migrations, who told me I had to fill in this one form and then that was it..., boy, was she wrong!

A week later I called them up to make sure they had gotten the application, which they hadn't - as it turned out their whole website had been down that day, so the woman I was talking to might not have been able to see anything in the system due to the fact that the system was DOWN!!!

A day later I called again, the letter HAD to have reached them by now... Yes, it had - but it said in the computer that the application had not been sent!

"Not been sent"?!? I had filled out the form, I had gotten the papers from Skattemyndigheten ("Familjebevis"), I had filled everything out correctly, and put it all in the envelope and mailed it.

What could have gone wrong? Had our letter got lost in the mail or what?!?

It turns out we should have filled out another form as well, the same one that you fill out when you ORIGINALLY apply for a residency permit...

OK - there was nothing else I could do but print out the correct form, fill it in (I used the copy we had made of the original application as a "cheat sheet") and then send it by mail..., no, wait - we migt as well go there and hand deliver it!

We went there by bus, I got up to the reception desk and said "this is my husbands application for an extension of his residency permit", and the woman took it and stamped a date on it.

Now we both thought we were done..., oh yeah?!? A few days later I decided to call them up and ask just how long it would take before we could expect an appointment - on the website it said up to 180 days for some people, and his permit runs out in early October!

Well - THIS time they tell us we might have to wait until New Years, and then they ask if we had PAYED for the permit? Payed?!? All they told me over the pone was to fill out this and that form and that was that!

OK - so we had to pay 500 kronor for the permit extension, not too big a deal - but all in all it has been two weeks of trying to get the application straight!
Yesterday we got a letter in the mail with a receipt from Migrations, saying that the application had finally been received - so now all we can do is wait..., again...

I am a SWEDISH person, I can only imagine what it must feel like for those who are all alone, not understanding things correctly, trying to figure out this jungle of red tape...

:roll:
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HALE
post 29.Sep.2007, 08:01 AM
Post #9
Joined: 7.Oct.2006

Well done PeeWee and Entry. I was wondering how it had gone.I am happy for you both biggrin.gif
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Tennin
post 29.Sep.2007, 09:50 AM
Post #10
Joined: 4.May.2007

OMG and I totally thought that the extension process would be 10x easier than the actual application process>_<

Peewee, I hope that you and your husband get the extension permit soon.
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PeeWee
post 29.Sep.2007, 07:22 PM
Post #11
Joined: 19.Jul.2007

QUOTE ("HALE)
Well done PeeWee and Entry. I was wondering how it had gone.I am happy for you both biggrin.gif

Thank you, HALE... biggrin.gif

QUOTE (Tennin)
OMG and I totally thought that the extension process would be 10x easier than the actual application process>_<

Peewee, I hope that you and your husband get the extension permit soon.

Yes, Tennin..., we sort of figured it would be more or less a rubber stamp thing the second time around..., little did WE know... *sigh*

I added up the amount of time that I spent on the phone with Migrations just for this application, and it comes up to a total of close to six hours!!!
Two thirds of this time was just me being on hold... "Du är fortfarande placerad i kö, var god dröj", "All our lines are still busy, please hold the line..." :roll:

The "on hold" message felt SO much more polite in English after hearing it about five billion times!!!
"Yes, stupid Swedish voice, I KNOW I am still placed in the line of people waiting to get through to you, I AM waiting, give me a break already!!!"
The English "please hold the line" made me start humming on my very own "on hold music" - after a while I was singing Toto's "Hold the line" out loud and having a pretty good time, even though I was on hold for so long! laugh.gif

At least this time around he gets to STAY IN THE COUNTRY while he waits for his appointment - even if (most likely) the permit expires, he is still allowed to be here - in fact, he can't really travel out of Sweden until he gets the extension..., well - he can LEAVE Sweden, but coming back IN might then be a hassle!

Once you have the PERMANENT permit, though, it is valid as long as your passport is valid (SO glad hubby had just gotten a new passport when he came here, his is valid until 2014!) - so when you have to travel to your closest embassy or consulate to get your passport renewed, you have to make sure before hand that you know exactly what to do about getting the new permit put into the new passport - this will be one of the things we will make dang sure to ask about once hubby gets his appointment..., sometimes after New Year's was it?

Blechhh - sometimes I get so tired... tongue.gif

To be quite honest, I did (in a very polite way, mind you) let the people I talked to on the phone know just how I felt about the very vague information that the website provides, and the fact that you don't get any information before hand, and WHY can't they send out a letter or something to people when their permits and whatnots are about to expire?

You have to stay on top of everything and figure it all out on your own, and other people's experience and advice really doesn't help if your situation differs from theirs - I was going crazy trying to figure out which form was the correct one, was he seeking an extension on his permit based on family ties or marital status or what was it, and USA is not a part of the EU, was the form I had still the right one, and which amount of money was really the right one, there were a long row of different fees for different situations... AAAAAARGH!!!

*gets all upset again just thinking about it and decides to have a cup of coffee and a smoke to calm herself down*
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Tennin
post 29.Sep.2007, 10:51 PM
Post #12
Joined: 4.May.2007

QUOTE (PeeWee)
You have to stay on top of everything and figure it all out on your own, and other people's experience and advice really doesn't help if your situation differs from theirs - I was going crazy trying to figure out which form was the correct one, was he seeking an extension on his permit based on family ties or marital status or what was it, and USA is not a part of the EU, was the form I had still the right one, and which amount of money was really the right one, there were a long row of different fees for different situations... AAAAAARGH!!!

*gets all upset again just thinking about it and decides to have a cup of coffee and a smoke to calm herself down*


Hi PeeWee, I feel your fustration. I totally know how the headache feels for the process. The website for what you need and have to do doesn't really give too much details. Then the times to call the Consulate are only two hours out of the day for 4 days. I'd try for days to get through to have the questions answered. Same thing for the Tullverket and Jordbruksverket, website is very vague, then I had to write a bunch of emails to get the proper answers. So it was a lot of trying to figure out what to do.

Too bad there aren't guidebooks on what you're supposed to know/do to apply for visas/extensions, and for once you're there. Though I do have to say thanks to everyone sharing their experience and stories on the Discussion board here on the Local it's helped a lot on some of the questions I've had biggrin.gif
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Camorin
post 30.Sep.2007, 08:16 AM
Post #13
Joined: 12.Mar.2006

QUOTE (PeeWee)
My husband applied for a residency permit back in 2004 (at the end of the year), based on relations - we got married just before he applied at the consulate in NYC.

He is on disability, so a work permit was redundant, but he still got one with the residency permit (once it went through).

Speeding it up, well, then you would have to have a spouse who is seriously ill and who can't take care of him/herself without your help.

He got his residency permit in October 2005...

Right now we are in the process of applying for an extension of his residency permit (they grant you a 2 year period to begin with) and it has proven to be a lot more difficult than we thought.

First off, I called them up two months before hubby's permit was going to expire - it helps to do it in good time, right?

I talked to one woman at Migrations, who told me I had to fill in this one form and then that was it..., boy, was she wrong!

A week later I called them up to make sure they had gotten the application, which they hadn't - as it turned out their whole website had been down that day, so the woman I was talking to might not have been able to see anything in the system due to the fact that the system was DOWN!!!

A day later I called again, the letter HAD to have reached them by now... Yes, it had - but it said in the computer that the application had not been sent!

"Not been sent"?!? I had filled out the form, I had gotten the papers from Skattemyndigheten ("Familjebevis"), I had filled everything out correctly, and put it all in the envelope and mailed it.

What could have gone wrong? Had our letter got lost in the mail or what?!?

It turns out we should have filled out another form as well, the same one that you fill out when you ORIGINALLY apply for a residency permit...

OK - there was nothing else I could do but print out the correct form, fill it in (I used the copy we had made of the original application as a "cheat sheet") and then send it by mail..., no, wait - we migt as well go there and hand deliver it!

We went there by bus, I got up to the reception desk and said "this is my husbands application for an extension of his residency permit", and the woman took it and stamped a date on it.

Now we both thought we were done..., oh yeah?!? A few days later I decided to call them up and ask just how long it would take before we could expect an appointment - on the website it said up to 180 days for some people, and his permit runs out in early October!

Well - THIS time they tell us we might have to wait until New Years, and then they ask if we had PAYED for the permit? Payed?!? All they told me over the pone was to fill out this and that form and that was that!

OK - so we had to pay 500 kronor for the permit extension, not too big a deal - but all in all it has been two weeks of trying to get the application straight!
Yesterday we got a letter in the mail with a receipt from Migrations, saying that the application had finally been received - so now all we can do is wait..., again...

I am a SWEDISH person, I can only imagine what it must feel like for those who are all alone, not understanding things correctly, trying to figure out this jungle of red tape...

:roll:

First of all, good luck with getting the applications processed in time. Waiting times are sometimes are really frustrating.

Yes there is a lot of bureaucracy when one waits for processing. But to make an application, I don't think it is as complicated and messy as you have written. I am not sure if you had patience enough to read through the website which is both in Swedish and English or be clear in using the correct terms. And yeah it is better to go through websites than calling customer service in Sweden. They often don't know much. There have been occassions where the customer can guide the customer service staff in Sweden.


Here are some extracts from the website under familjanknytning blanketter.

Uppehållstillstånd, främlingspass och uppehållstillstånd för besök ("Ansökan om UT, FP, RD och FF")
114021
För uppehållstillstånd med anknytningsskäl, främlingspass och besök längre tid än 3 månader. ÄVEN FÖR FÖRLÄNGNING AV UPPEHÅLLSTILLSTÅND. (Obs! För medborgare i EU/EES, Schweiz, varakltigt bosatta i EU samt anhöriga till dessa finns särskilda blanketter.)
Svenska Engelska

and under Vad kostar det?
Förlängning av tillstånd
Behöver du förlänga ditt tillstånd betalar du samma summa som vid en förstagångsansökan
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PeeWee
post 30.Sep.2007, 11:29 AM
Post #14
Joined: 19.Jul.2007

QUOTE (Camorin)
Yes there is a lot of bureaucracy when one waits for processing. But to make an application, I don't think it is as complicated and messy as you have written. I am not sure if you had patience enough to read through the website which is both in Swedish and English or be clear in using the correct terms. And yeah it is better to go through websites than calling customer service in Sweden. They often don't know much. There have been occassions where the customer can guide the customer service staff in Sweden.

In all fairness, I am known to be a bit "dizzy" and "scatterbrained" at times... laugh.gif

I was however VERY CLEAR about just what kind of application my call was about, I would think that the numerous times I called and told them that my American husband's first 2-year long residency permit was about to expire and I wanted to know just what to do about applying for an extension would sort of give them a hint of what I was attempting to do, right? wink.gif

When it comes to getting the exact information about things like this (Swedish authority stuff, I mean), I prefer talking to a human being rather than looking through stuff written on a web site.

If the web site has links to everything that is related, that's one thing - for example, when looking at which form to fill out there should be a link right there that takes you to the section with the fees and to any other information on things you need to know or do in order for the application to be filled out properly - but when you have to search through multiple sections and try to combine it all into a whole, that's just too confusing for me...

The people I talk to on the phone very often fail to give me the proper information - however, they seldom admit to not knowing.
It would be good if they did, and then got me in touch with someone who was better suited to give me the proper information!

When the number you call is listed as "Information", this is what you expect to receive when you DO call - if they can't provide you with full information, they should list that particular number as "Half-a**ed information" or something... :roll:

(I am not known as being a "pushy person" either, I usually just say "Thank you" and hang up when the person on the other end has given me the information and I sense that they want to "get rid of me", even if I still don't understand exactly or feel like some of the information might be missing... I think to myself that I will be able to figure it out on my own... Could this be typical Swedish behavior?!? tongue.gif )

QUOTE (Tennin)
Too bad there aren't guidebooks on what you're supposed to know/do to apply for visas/extensions, and for once you're there.

Oh yes - a "How to"-booklet would be a VERY good thing to have!

A "Welcome to Sweden - what you need to know and do now" book is something else that I have been thinking about! This book should then be handed out free of charge upon arrival (or at the Swedish consulate/embassy when you go to get the residency permit put into your passport.).

While going through the motions of all this, I sent a thought of compassion to those out there who might be all alone, dyslexic, computer illiterate, unable to read, speak and fully understand both Swedish and English...

For them, this kind of thing must be a thousand times worse!!!
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Camorin
post 30.Sep.2007, 04:12 PM
Post #15
Joined: 12.Mar.2006

I understand your gentleness and sometimes the Swedish attitude is to not insist too much. But there are times where you need to make sure u get what you wanted. For example one has to wait for a long time on Migrationsverket's Upplysning before getting through to an assistant. It is after all their job to fill you with all the information. Swedes in general seem to be too loyal and courteous at times and the authorities seem to get away with it. They are shy or feel awkward to trouble anybody too much.

Claim your rights! And Good luck with your application!
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