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Housewives in Sweden.

*The End Is Nigh*
post 3.Apr.2008, 07:03 PM
Post #1


Hello 'citizens' of the Local, I would like some advice.
You might think I'm old fashioned but I want to be a housewife. I married my Swedish Husband when I was very young and left my home country after high school, so I have never had a job before.

My mother was a housewife who stayed at home with me and my siblings, so for me the concept of a housewife is not something bad, low or old fashioned. I was happy to be with my mother when I was a child.

I'm young but my hearth is at my home with my husband and children. I really don't want to leave my family because it's just more important to me then any job or money.

So, my questions to you all:

- Is it possible to be a housewife in Sweden?
- Will I still receive some kind of pension when I'm old even though I have never worked in Sweden?
- Can I receive any help from the government if I become a housewife and something happens to my husband and he gets sick or dies?
- Can you think of any pros and cons in being a housewife in Sweden?

Thanks for any reply.
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Shark99 - The Great Catsb...
post 3.Apr.2008, 07:49 PM
Post #2
Joined: 11.Aug.2005

My mom was a house wife and took care of us three kids. She was Swedish and did a good job. There's nothing wrong with wanting to be a house wife. As for the whole pension thing and what happens if your husband should die, I don't really know. I don't think my mom gets a pension, and my dad has been retired for a few years.
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Puffin
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:25 PM
Post #3
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

It's perfecty possible to be housewife in Sweden but you have to bear in mind that this is not really the norm in Sweden and there are not the type of "housewife" social opportunities that exist in other countries to meet other housewives as most other people are at work. Therefore it can be a very isolating experience if you are not careful and somedays you may not speak to anyne appart from your husband.

It's quite a tough financial hit that you take to be a housewife in Sweden and the first question would be whether your husband earns enough for it to be finanically viable to stay homeas pension changes means that it is assumed that younger people will have worked and contributed to their own pensions.

To secure your future you would really need to look into saving towards a private pension. You might get a guarantee pension (earlier known as a poverty pension) but that is only about student grant level - a little more than social bidrag levels. Your husband can also sign over part of his pension to you but it will mean that his own pension will be reduced by someting like 30-40%.

You do get certin pension contributions made at a minimal level while you are climing the guarentee level of maternity benefit for approx one year with each child.

If something happens to your husband then you may get social bidrag for a limited period but you will then be forced to get a job - also social services can place restrictions on the lifestyle of people receiving social bidrag that may be unpleasant - for example demand that you sell your car or expensive houshold possessions as a condition of recieving aim. So you would probably want to consider getting some for of life/invalidity insurance to cover your husbands income.

I was a housewife for 4 years while my kids were young. Although it worked OK with small kids it was also a pretty isolating experience after a while as the norm is for people to work in Sweden so there is nothing to do and noone to speak to if you stay home. In the entire street I was the only one who was home during the day.

There is also the question of how you will feel being totally dependent on your husband.
~ How will he feel about you being home and him taking the full financial burden?
~ How will you split the money?
~ Will you have to ask permission to spend money on yourself?
~ Will you be fluent in Swedish or will you be dependent on your husband/children for trips to the doctor etc
~ how will you make your own friends?

Could it be a possible compromise to work or study part time - thereby obtaining you own social network but leaving you plenty of time to devote to your family and home?
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Roowhip
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:27 PM
Post #4
Joined: 16.Sep.2005

Welcome to the local Nasta Pasta..I am an oldie making a possibly temporary return to this nut house!


- Is it possible to be a housewife in Sweden?
Anything is possible however you will probably hear many Swedes complaining that it is impossible to live on one income in Sweden but it's a matter of priorities and it can be done for sure


- Will I still receive some kind of pension when I'm old even though I have never worked in Sweden?
I don't think you are entitled to any pension if you don't plan to work..it might be wise to look at private pension alternatives/insurance upon death of you husband.


- Can I receive any help from the government if I become a housewife and something happens to my husband and he gets sick or dies?

Every family is entitled to barnbidrag (there is a rising scale- 1050 per child plus an additional amount for each extra child you have ie 100 for 2, 454 for 3 and 1314 for 4..you get the drift..)

- Can you think of any pros and cons in being a housewife in Sweden?

Don't have time to go into an essay on this now but I would say the main con is that you might be very lonely as there are not many Swedes that choose to stay at home after the child is about 16 months of age. This is due to many factors..culture and the taxation system is set up so as to encourage mothers back into the workforce. This means there are very few organized activities for toddlers at home. Apart from that, if you are new to Sweden, you may feel even more isolated and have a harder time integrating/learning language if you are at home (this was the main reason I went to study then work upon arriving in sweden 6 years ago with a 9mth old and 3 year old after having been home since the birth of my daughter)
pros I would expect you are aware of already..

Good luck!

Btw, although I am usually anti pc, the term housewife is just making me cringe--
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Fishtank
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:30 PM
Post #5
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

^
What an articulate post?
Puffin, The Great rocks as usual.

Cheers Puffin. biggrin.gif
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Roowhip
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:32 PM
Post #6
Joined: 16.Sep.2005

QUOTE
What an articulate post?
Puffin, The Great rocks as usual.

Cheers Puffin.


Thanks for your vote of confidence Mr Fishy..I think I might crawl back into my asylumn from the local :roll:
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Fishtank
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:41 PM
Post #7
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

Rooo... welcome back to the Great TL. Hope you are doing fine with all new stuff.

Be active here once in a while and come out of your Asylum.

*Roo... you have been to sweden for too long time now.
It's Asylum NOT Asylumn laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
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Puffin
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:48 PM
Post #8
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

It's interesting what you say Roowhip as the isolation was one of the things that got me into studying. By the time my eldest got to be 3-4 there was very little for her to do as everyone was back at work and the friends we'd made at öppna förskola were at dagis. My only communication with the outside world was reading the local paper which mainly consisted of the school/retirement home lunch menus biggrin.gif

While I was at komvux there was a woman on SFI who had lived in Sweden as a completely isolated housewife for 27 years - totally unable to communicate except through her husband and without any friends of her own.
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Roowhip
post 3.Apr.2008, 08:58 PM
Post #9
Joined: 16.Sep.2005

QUOTE
Rooo... welcome back to the Great TL. Hope you are doing fine with all new stuff.

Be active here once in a while and come out of your Asylum.

*Roo... you have been to sweden for too long time now.
It's Asylum NOT Asylumn


laugh.gif I'm just waiting for Birthday Beth to send me off to boot camp for that mistake...she has done it before :wink:
Not only have I been in Sweden too long but I worked in an area closely related to asylum seekers..not anymore though..am flying high now..
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Mib
post 3.Apr.2008, 09:02 PM
Post #10
Joined: 7.Jul.2006

I see being a housewife as a luxury these days as most families have to have 2 people working to have a reasonable lifestyle. Most countries are having problems covering pensions for people who used to work, so I doubt there will be pensions for housewives who never work where they do not pay taxes.

Now, I hate these type of people, but one of the ways to get what you want is to work for say 1 to 2 years full time and then pretend you have a bad back etc and receive benefit for the next several years off the state. Alternatively, see if you can set up a part time business from home, so you can be based at home, look after your family and earn some money... this would be the best option assuming your husband cannot afford to cover all of the financial demands.

Now, we live in a very materialistic world where most people expect X & Y. But, cut out the unnecessary holidays/breaks, own a small car if you really need one, don't change your TV/mobile phone/computer etc every year. Where possible use eco-friendly methods to minimise your power consumption, don't buy takeways, grow some of your food, have a more traditional life where you spend evenings eating, reading and talking together. Live in a smaller house/flat and after ll of that, you may well be able to afford to live happily with just one person working.
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Streja
post 3.Apr.2008, 10:04 PM
Post #11
Joined: 10.Jul.2006

I just wonder what the housewives do when the kids are 6 and older and go to school until they are 19? I mean surely there can't be THAT much housework to do in this age of washing machines etc...seriously...plus kids have after school activities. All you can do is take them there in a car or something. I don't get it. Shouldn't kids spend time with their friends and play outside when they are that old? Occasional activities with your parents are normal but come on!
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Mib
post 3.Apr.2008, 11:37 PM
Post #12
Joined: 7.Jul.2006

After the kids have gone, they meet up with other Housewives to have lunch, talk about the price of face cream going up and eye up the guys on the street.

I saw an episode of Wife Swap in England and this woman would make sure the house was clean and the dinner was ready for her husband when he came home. She would dress up in stockings and high heels and a nice dress and would take off his shoes when he came through the door. When he was ready, they would go upstairs and have a good time, while their son who was about 8+ yrs old would be able to hear them huffing and puffing while he was downstairs playing by himself. Take the son out of the equation and this guy seemed to have a perfect setup.
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Michele
post 4.Apr.2008, 06:02 AM
Post #13
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 3.Jun.2005

QUOTE (Streja)
I just wonder what the housewives do when the kids are 6 and older and go to school until they are 19? I mean surely there can't be THAT much housework to do in this age of washing machines etc...seriously...plus kids have after school activities. All you can do is take them there in a car or something. I don't get it. Shouldn't kids spend time with their friends and play outside when they are that old? Occasional activities with your parents are normal but come on!
Most true 'housewives' also take on the more involved things. Whenever I've been out of work, I tend to make more things. Sew my kids clothes, making sheets and blankets. I'm currently out of work and I've already made 8 quilts for christmas presents this year, 3 baby blankets for friends who just had babies, 1 lap blanket for one of my kids birthdays and a flaming dragon duvet for another of my daughters. I've also finally had time to finish the balcony into another room (that is now my daughters bedroom), swap all the rooms around, give the house a deep clean, file all the paperwork into our new file cabinets (3+ years of paperwork), go through all the kids clothing and sort out what no longer fits and repair all the tears and holes, package up into individual portions the 20 kilos of homemade bath salts for christmas and other presents. And that's just the tip of the iceberg of things on my list.

It's not like we just sit here watching soaps.
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Earthcapricorn
post 4.Apr.2008, 07:07 AM
Post #14
Joined: 29.Jun.2007

Can we just use the term Stay at Home Mum SAHM, I'm one of those (though also a p/t student) and the term 'Housewife' makes me wince, with the image of a woman in a pinny taking off her husband's shoes as he returns from a hard day at the office. :?
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007
post 4.Apr.2008, 07:25 AM
Post #15
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 2.Apr.2006

i was a bit thrown by the term "housewife" as you accurately put, most women who choose to stay at home would never use it. i would assume that english isn't her first language.

i think homemaker sounds good too.
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