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Can a Swedish Citizen take SFI course?

I'm a Swede who can't speak Swedish..

ninaws
post 14.Jul.2017, 07:11 PM
Post #1
Location: United States
Joined: 23.Nov.2016

So I have a what is probably a fairly unique situation.

I'm a dual American-Swedish citizen who has never lived in Sweden. My mother, at the time, was very self-conscious about being a foreigner in this country so she made a point to only speak English with my brother and me when we were growing up so we are not bi-lingual.

For a variety of reasons, I am considering a move to Sweden. While I have some knowledge of the language, I am in no way fluent. Would I be able to enroll in a Swedish for Immigrants course once I am over there or would I be unable to do so since I am svensk medborgare?
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Bsmith
post 14.Jul.2017, 07:31 PM
Post #2
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Not sure about the SFI, perhaps contacting the Swedish embassy might help. Certainly there are options to learn Swedish here in the States prior to your move. However, you will learn much more once you are totally immersed in the language.

Good luck.
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ninaws
post 14.Jul.2017, 07:39 PM
Post #3
Location: United States
Joined: 23.Nov.2016

I am currently working privately with a tutor to get myself up to speed as much as I can before moving (should that happen). But I will reach out to the Embassy and ask about whether or not I would qualify for the SFI course; I hadn't thought of doing that!

Thanks!

Ou of curiosity, what are the wait times likes? Even if I don't qualify, my husband will as he's not a citizen. Good info to know for the managing of expectations. wink.gif
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rex
post 14.Jul.2017, 11:06 PM
Post #4
Joined: 3.Jul.2017

Anyone can take SFI courses in Sweden, I don't think there are any requirements at all. You just have to go to the commune and sign up; from my experience it usually takes anywhere between two to six weeks waiting before the course starts. But this was before the refugee crisis; you should definitely ask someone else who's had a more recent experience.

It is worth mentioning that the SFI courses are only suitable for people who have no clue at all about Swedish. On average it takes four months to finish the courses if you're studying full time and going to the classes every day. The next courses are for those who want to become fluent in Swedish, however these courses require you to have a personal number and be a resident in Sweden. Usually, there is a *very* long waiting time for these courses, and they also last for a long time, with some of them you can take additional courses like math, physics, etc., which gives you an opportunity to practice your Swedish at the same time.

Nowadays, there is also a choice to pick flexible/distance courses in Swedish at Hermods. From my experience they're awful, but some people can't attend the regular courses or don't want to wait a long time for the regular courses so they go to these ones instead.
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Case officer
post 15.Jul.2017, 12:01 PM
Post #5
Joined: 25.Jul.2012

Skollagen:

Rätt att delta

31 § En person har rätt att delta i utbildning i svenska för invandrare från och med andra kalenderhalvåret det år han eller hon fyller 16 år, om han eller hon
1. är bosatt i landet, och
2. saknar sådana grundläggande kunskaper i svenska språket som utbildningen syftar till att ge.

32 § Den som har sådana kunskaper i det danska eller norska språket att utbildning i svenska för invandrare inte kan anses nödvändig har inte rätt att delta i utbildningen.
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superdrive
post 15.Jul.2017, 10:05 PM
Post #6
Joined: 13.Sep.2015

It's called Svenska för invandrare (Swedish for immigrants) for a reason. If you are a citizen, you are not an immigrant. Maybe try Swedish as a Second language (SAS).
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Bsmith
post 15.Jul.2017, 10:18 PM
Post #7
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

If she is immigrating from the US, that most likely makes her an immigrant.
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superdrive
post 15.Jul.2017, 11:12 PM
Post #8
Joined: 13.Sep.2015

No, he's a Swedish citizen. An American born in Germany moving to USA, doesn't make him an immigrant.
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riemann
post 15.Jul.2017, 11:57 PM
Post #9
Joined: 30.Jan.2017

I was a citizen the 3rd time I signed up for SFI (dropped out that time too). The programme is extremely slow and frustrating to learn from if you have any kind of advanced education. I eventually gave in and paid for Folkuniversitet which was a far better experience.
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ninaws
post 16.Jul.2017, 07:23 PM
Post #10
Location: United States
Joined: 23.Nov.2016

Hmm! Since I will have some experience with Swedish (from tutoring and also via osmosis simply from growing up with Swedish family), perhaps paying for Folkuniversitet is the way to go, especially considering the wait times and the uncertainty of whether or not I would even qualify for the SFI course.

I was just over in Sweden for three weeks visiting my relatives and it was the most maddening thing. When I would listen to them talk, while I could not follow along word for word, I could comprehend enough to understand the conversation. But my ability to communicate in Swedish to them is much more limited. Everyone speaks English so it's not like I was walled off but it was frustrating to me to be unable to converse with them in Swedish.

I look forward to the day when I easily can.
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umers
post 17.Jul.2017, 10:23 PM
Post #11
Joined: 10.Oct.2014

It is absolutely possible for citizens to take SFI course. I know a few people who are swedish citizens but never lived in Sweden and have recently moved back to Sweden and are taking SFI course.
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ninaws
post 18.Jul.2017, 12:58 AM
Post #12
Location: United States
Joined: 23.Nov.2016

QUOTE (umers @ 17.Jul.2017, 02:23 PM) *
It is absolutely possible for citizens to take SFI course. I know a few people who are swedish citizens but never lived in Sweden and have recently moved back to Sweden and are taking SFI course.


As an aside: how do they like living in Sweden? Did they find moving/adjusting difficult? How did reality measure up to their expectations?
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