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Immigration question: Cohabitant partners

Registration of CP for non Swedish citizens

MrBr83
post 22.Oct.2017, 04:26 PM
Post #1
Joined: 22.Oct.2017

Dear Forum,

I'm posting here for the first time with a question about the Swedish immigration law in order to find some suggestions on how to proceed with my personal situation. I apologise if this is not the right forum in advance smile.gif .

I came to Sweden from Germany (as a German citizen) at the beginning of the year 2017 to start a new job. As a EU citizen I was granted unrestricted work and residence permission in Sweden.

In the meantime I fell in love with a woman. We're together now for a couple of months. She's from the Philippines and came to Sweden for an au-pair year. Her Visa is valid until end of February 2018.

We're currently thinking about moving together next year and eventually live together as cohabitant partners if the law allows. I'm currently trying to find out a little bit more about what the Migration Agency will ask for when we want to register as cohabitant partners.

So my questions currently are:

* Is it possible for us to register as cohabitant partners based on our status here in Sweden?
* What kind of documents do we have to apply for when we want to register as cohabitant partners?
* I heard that the Migration Agency will check if we're in a stable union (whatever the definition is). Is it possible for my girlfriend to stay with me while the process is pending even if her Visa expired?
* Is it recommendable to hire an immigration lawyer for the upcoming paperwork?

I should mention, that I have a salary of about ~50k (before tax) and live in a 60qm apartment that has enough space for the both of us to live in.

If anyone has some answers on this I would be thankful for any kind of help.

Thank you so much!

MrBr
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the_austrian
post 22.Oct.2017, 05:32 PM
Post #2
Joined: 3.Jan.2016

Hallo smile.gif

Schön, dass du dich an dieses Forum gewandt hast.

With us, it was like that: To show that our relationship was "real", we had to show that we had lived together outside of Sweden under the same address for at least two years for my sambo to join me in Sweden.

My sambo (non-EU, from South Africa) then got a residence card as a "family member of an EU citizen" and can live and work here legally until the day that I have the right of residence. EU residence card is valid for five years and we can then apply for permanent residence for my sambo once I as the EU citizen apply for that piece of paper stating that I am now a permanent resident.

In your position it should be easier as your sambo already is in Sweden (I hope that for you)?

But surely someone here knows better smile.gif

Best wishes
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Gjeebes
post 22.Oct.2017, 06:25 PM
Post #3
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

I think I should share the "surprises" that are buried within the "family member of an EU citizen" route.

I came to Sweden (as non-EU) with a job, with an EU citizen whom I'm married to. I also got the "family member of an EU citizen" status, but, as I found out, I had, with that, no access to healthcare! Yes, I was already here 6 months, working full time, paying taxes, and wanted to get the EU health card as I had to travel within the EU for my work at times.

So, "family member of an EU citizen" is bares bones, you have no rights to nothing. So I went to MV and they said I could apply again, but that I had to do it outside of Sweden! I asked, "WTF"? I live, work and pay taxes here, but to get health-care access in Sweden (and when travelling, from Sweden in the EU) I had to quit my job, move out of Sweden, reapply, and then come back, assuming I was "approved".

Well, I did have to crack a LOT of skulls, and in the end, as I was told, my "status" was "amended" with 1 sentence (apparently I was the 6th person in Sweden to have this "service" performed), et voila, I can live, work, pay taxes AND have access to health-care in Sweden. And I didn't have to move out and move back.

The Swedish model: we make everything as unnecessarily complicated as we can, just because we can.
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the_austrian
post 22.Oct.2017, 07:03 PM
Post #4
Joined: 3.Jan.2016

Hi Gjeebes,

Oh my God, this is terrible! My sambo and I had not yet had to seek healthcare services, so that might be a surprise for us too ...

My sambo's "residence card" is bound to me being here and having a job.

Just to clarify, you came here with your wife, but you were the one with the job. Did they not register you for a health insurance when you started work?

I am a bit shocked now. Migrationsverket told me (but I have nothing in writing) that once my sambo has the PN, she will automatically be eligible for healthcare due to her residence card coppled with PN.

Best wishes
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Gjeebes
post 22.Oct.2017, 07:56 PM
Post #5
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

Well, at the time, I was already registered at a chosen health ward, but I hadn't used it yet. It could be that because I had the personnummer that they wouldn't have caught it (or at least, right away).

It was the first of many shocks to come moving to Sweden. I could not have fathomed such a system existed anywhere in the world, that actually has hospitals and a "functioning" healthcare.

Well, if you want the acid test, try to get that EU heath card, for when you travel in the EU (and outside of Sweden). That is how I found out of the problems, and the person was very smug, and very blunt, "you have no rights to anything here" (which again I found incredible as a working resident tax-payer).

I had to take 3 weeks off work (worked from home) because I could not risk being around a lab blowing up (I am a chemist) while this non-sense was sorted out.

The Swedish model: know the easy way, go the hard way.

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the_austrian
post 23.Oct.2017, 07:00 AM
Post #6
Joined: 3.Jan.2016

Oh my ... wow!

And how was it resolved in the end? You left Sweden and applied applied for what exactly outside of Sweden? The residence card again? I am a bit confused as to how you got it sorted (what the steps were) and would really appreciate it if you shared it here ...

Best wishes
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Gjeebes
post 23.Oct.2017, 10:13 AM
Post #7
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

In the end, my status "statement" was "amended" with one sentence. And then I got the card. I did not move out of Sweden to get it done, but as I said, I did have to "crack some skulls" to get this sorted. They also tried to charge me 1500 SEK as some "inventive" processing fee. But I had already read that it was not correct. Yet, they did not believe me, so I had to go home, print the info (from their own fricken web site), register for a new appointment, and show them that they could not charge me the fees. Then they had to go check their web page themselves, and after some "discussion", agreed that I was correct.

It was a while back, from a period I have more or less blocked from memory, as it would be too tiring to actually recall ALL of the bullshit I have experienced with the "Swedish efficiency", envy of the world.

There were no "steps", and even if there had been, there is zero consistency in any of Sweden's "high-quality service" governmental institutions. So I am quite certain, while in essence it "could" work the same way for you, it is highly improbable.

Just contact Försäkringskassan and request cards for you and yours. In this way, you will get the real experience, of what it means to live in mighty Sweden (best country in the universe).

The Swedish model: not knowing what we are doing is the source of our "hurdy gurdy bork bork".
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the_austrian
post 23.Oct.2017, 03:01 PM
Post #8
Joined: 3.Jan.2016

Hi Gjeebes,

I have just checked - it does not even allow me to get a EU health card (as an EU citizen), försäkringskassan said ...
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Gjeebes
post 23.Oct.2017, 06:04 PM
Post #9
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

I'm not surprised. You will need to have your "status" amended, which means, they will try to make you do it from outside Sweden. Refuse, and say you want the amendment while you are living your life here, paying taxes, working, and tell them you know it can be done.

My wonderful experience was in 2011. I would guess after the immigration disaster, the clogging of the system, etc, etc, etc, things have likely changed for the worse (i.e. even more unqualified MV personnel, and even less functional congruence).

I have lived in 6 countries and Sweden comes in at last place, no matter how I look at it.
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