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How long do you plan to work in Sweden?

Long term plan

HiSweden
post 3.Jan.2018, 12:50 AM
Post #1
Joined: 26.Jan.2015

Hi

I would like to hear from people who are already working in Sweden. I do not mean people who are staying here only because of relationship/studies.

What do you think about Sweden in terms of work and eventually retirement? Is it one of the best countries to work at? Is there huge differences between the systems and advantages you have as a worker in Sweden?

What are other good places to work at in and out of europe?

I am asking this question as I am not sure how it works if I work in Sweden for few years, then move somewhere else and do few years, and keep going like this. Maybe if I do this, at the end I won't get much when I retire.

It seems you can claim pension rights if you worked in different European countries, not sure what is the minimum number of years you should work in each.

But would be nice to hear from your experiences and opinions as I am a recent graduate and not sure how things work, FK did not help smile.gif

Thanks
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Cheeseroller
post 3.Jan.2018, 02:57 AM
Post #2
Location: Germany
Joined: 10.Apr.2007

Pension. If you work in country A for 20 years and B for 15 years, the eventual state pension you get from both, which cannot be combined, will be worth much less than if you stay in one country. In that case, have a private pension as well, that can be moved.

None of us knows what the next 40 years brings, with economy, AI and robotics. Not least the migrant costs in Sweden and Germany (although Germany should be rich enough to weather this). The best pension you can have is to invest in property and lease it out, which having an appreciating asset. But Sweden is less attractive for this, compared to Germany or the UK.
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Gjeebes
post 3.Jan.2018, 06:37 AM
Post #3
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

You need to consider if you embrace lagom, or not. And I'm not talking the vintage Viking rendition of it, that made sure there was enough drink in the cup for everyone to have a taste. No. I'm talking about the modern "bastardised" version of it, where it is more fashionable to be extremely mediocre, to lack any confidence and pride, in all that you do.

The work ethic generally sucks in Sweden. If you embrace "lowered expectations", however, and if you are utterly incapable, then you will thrive. If you have ambition, expectations and a real "get-go" attitude, you will be scorned and thereby restricted, as one who has tried to stand out from the pack.

The only thing keeping Sweden going, is that it rides the coat-tails of past achievement. Loads of money, old money (that will certainly run out) to be wasted on ill-conceived ventures (open border immigration for one recent example).

They are currently looking at (or perhaps it is already complete) raising the retirement age in Sweden. Also, all people who retire, that I am aware of, have to move immediately to a crappy wee flat, because the state pension is so small. Yes, they have to give up that house they have been paying for, for 35 years, because they still are nowhere close to owning it. If you don't have a corporate contribution, or savings of your own, you will be living in poverty, in Sweden (just simply ask around), during your "golden" years.

A couple of years in Sweden, as a youngster, will not likely hurt too much. But make the plan time-limited, to just a couple years. Sweden in general lacks opportunities to grow a career, partly due to glass ceilings, partly due to its narrow-minded focus (IT or bust).

I was shocked and disappointed with the low level of competence and the general lack of work ethic here. Very lazy people floating through who have little to offer, seeing promotions to higher and higher levels of responsibility, only to carry out their duties in an extremely amateur fashion, with sprinkles of fecklessness and disorganisation.

I would recommend you to avoid Sweden like the plague. I found people in Germany much much more to my liking in the life-style, the capabilities, the knowledge-base and the work ethic. They know what they are doing. In Germany, shit gets done. In Sweden, shit gets done, tomorrow (maybe), and then gets redone and redone, until by some chance, it finally gets done right (and doing it "right" will only see you shunned as an "over-achiever"!).
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Cheeseroller
post 3.Jan.2018, 07:04 AM
Post #4
Location: Germany
Joined: 10.Apr.2007

If you have the illusion that because many people in Sweden speak English, that this will make finding a job easier, it won't. Not surprisingly, Swedes want to communicate in their own language in the company and want all employees to be able to understand health and safety info, memo's etc. So unless you have in demand skills (i.e. programmer with experience), better to look elsewhere.

We moved to Germany from Sweden, and I've advised my adult kids in the Uk to do the same. You only have to look at who is the biggest economy in Europe and who has been a massive exporter for 40 years to see this has been the most stable country in Europe and will likely continue to be so.

Germany has an ageing demographic, and there are shortages right now in many industries - especially for technicians, engineers, scientists. Rental prices are affordable (unlike Stockholm, Gothenburg) and food prices similar to the UK. Culturally, Sweden is a bit of a dessert - there is much more to do and see in Germany, plus you are a drive away from the ski slopes in Austria, Switzerland and France, or summer med coasts.

Like Gjeebes, we found there are glass ceilings for foreigners in Sweden - even white university educated. In Germany once you have basic conversation and writing skills, you are judged by your ability and work ethic. Germans tend to work hard and play hard - and love to make fun. Learning German would also allow you to work in Austria and parts of Switzerland.

It also depends what degree you have. Some professions in Germany are difficult for a foreigner to enter i.e. teaching, lawyer - which require attendance at a German university and fluency in the language.

It also depends what kind of lifestyle you want and where you feel comfortable. Holland is worth consideration - modern country, good economy, good healthcare and the best pension system in Europe. Plus government bureaucrats speak English - which helps when you first move and getting established. If you live near the border, you could for example live in Holland and work in Germany or visa versa - this is quite common.

Outside of the EU, Canada, Australia, New Zealand are all options if you can get enough points to get a VISA. All have national health systems - and that is why I would not recommend the USA.

Some useful websites:
http://www.make-it-in-germany.com/en/for-q...s/working/guide
https://www.toytowngermany.com
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HiSweden
post 4.Jan.2018, 11:00 PM
Post #5
Joined: 26.Jan.2015

QUOTE (Cheeseroller @ 3.Jan.2018, 02:57 AM) *
Pension. If you work in country A for 20 years and B for 15 years, the eventual state pension you get from both, which cannot be combined, will be worth much less than if you ... (show full quote)


Both Germany and the UK are choices for me, I dont think I fit in the culture here in Sweden, although there are many good things, still I do not want to stay here forever.

How does the private pension works? Do you need to be in the same country as the company you have your private pension in? Is there any big good European or international companies for that?

Of course, real estate is always an option, but the market now in Sweden is insanely high.
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gsurya
post 8.Jan.2018, 04:32 PM
Post #6
Location: Malmö
Joined: 8.Jan.2010

I still have an Indian passport, have lived and worked in USA, Denmark, Sweden, Singapore & now again Sweden since Oct 2017.

I guess I will work here for a few years now, I quite like the Nordic region both in terms of working and for travel around and have had my most fulfilling work-life here.

I want to do one work stint in Canada or Australia if possible.. never considered Britain, did a few projects there, but never liked it.

Eventually, when I cannot or dont want to work any more, I plan to retire in India, to sunset in surroundings I was born and grew up with and still have family and friends in.

I realize I did lose out on building up a good bank of 'country' pension by not staying in one country for long or buying property in these countries when I lived there, could have made a fortune already.
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Bsmith
post 8.Jan.2018, 06:13 PM
Post #7
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

It isn't all about money and I think you realize that. However, and I would recommend this to anybody: save, save, save. Don't plan on the government taking care of you...any government. They are all overextended. You need to have your own stable nest egg and even then, there are no guarantees.
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Gjeebes
post 9.Jan.2018, 06:04 AM
Post #8
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

"...save, save, save..."

And stay debt free. Live within your means, and then your savings, are actually yours.
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the_austrian
post 9.Jan.2018, 09:14 PM
Post #9
Joined: 3.Jan.2016

Hello,

I personally can really recommend Sweden as I am very, very happy here as an employee. I am, of course, aware that the conditions differ from company to company.

I am very lucky to have really kind co-workers and "bosses" (it is very non-hierarchical), I get an automatic salary raise every six months, we go on company trips abroad twice a year, every member of staff is highly respected, and what I find most amazing is that twice a year every staff member has a meeting with their senior where we are asked what the company can do for us as employees infividually. Questions are asked such as "What could make you happier at work? What could make you stay with us longer? Please let me tell you that everyone at this company appreciates you as a person and the great work you are doing." About what would make me happier, I said, for example, I'd like to travel more, so the company has arranged several work trips for me this year, for example to go to Berlin, New York, Zurich, Prague, Helsinki, and London. In some of these countries we have offices and they said I could work from wherever I liked.

I am so grateful and I know too well that not everyone in this forum would encourage you to stay in Sweden for work.

Just from a personal employee point of view, I would love to stay here as long as possible smile.gif

All the best
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Tenacious185
post 10.Jan.2018, 12:17 PM
Post #10
Joined: 4.Aug.2017

QUOTE (the_austrian @ 9.Jan.2018, 09:14 PM) *
Hello,I personally can really recommend Sweden as I am very, very happy here as an employee. I am, of course, aware that the conditions differ from company to company.I am ver ... (show full quote)


+1

I'd have to agree with that sentiment. Admittedly, I had to take some pretty crappy jobs out of the starting gate when I first arrived here, but I was prepared for that. (I didn't come here with a job offer - I had to sort that after arrival.) Eventually, I found a great gig, much like you describe at your job, and I realized that once you do get your foot in the door at the right place that's a good fit for you, it makes all the difference in the world. It's worth sticking it out for a while. The Swedish system is pretty generous. Not too hierarchical, nice work/life balance, good benefits, etc. Not to mention flexi-time and generous annual holiday leave.

I too would recommend Sweden to others - BUT not without saying you've gotta work for it. If you don't already have a job offer on the table it will be a struggle at first. For how long? That depends on what you put into it. Perseverence does pay off.
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Gjeebes
post 10.Jan.2018, 01:17 PM
Post #11
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

"That depends on what you put into it."

It also depends on the job sector. Service industries are far easier to get into anywhere, nothing special about Sweden in that.

But you are correct, Sweden does pamper quite fully.
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Tenacious185
post 10.Jan.2018, 01:30 PM
Post #12
Joined: 4.Aug.2017

QUOTE (Gjeebes @ 10.Jan.2018, 01:17 PM) *
"That depends on what you put into it."It also depends on the job sector. Service industries are far easier to get into anywhere, nothing special about Sweden in th ... (show full quote)


Very true! That was the crappy job I had in the beginning. Service sector. laugh.gif It got me by, but it wasn't ideal. Not the worst...but not ideal.

The pampering part is no joke, but it took a while to be able to experience it.
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Svedallas
post 13.Jan.2018, 09:33 PM
Post #13
Joined: 21.Apr.2016

QUOTE (HiSweden @ 3.Jan.2018, 12:50 AM) *
HiI would like to hear from people who are already working in Sweden. I do not mean people who are staying here only because of relationship/studies.What do you think about Sw ... (show full quote)


You need to have worked in Sweden for 40 years to get full pension.
So basically you need to have started working in Sweden at 27 to get it.

If it was later than that, all you can do is save.. or you will have to work more years.

Germany has fewer years.
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